Archerdan

Building our first anvil, progress,

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Having fun putting this together.

 

265 # slab of 1045, from a friend. 

 

Drilling the hardy and pritchel.

 

Turning a shaft of 1045 for the horn.

 

Sawing the angle.

 

Welding the horn.

 

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Man oh MAN THAT IS A BEAUTIFUL PEICE OF STEEL  :wub:

Looking good! Going to be an awesome anvil! Lots of support!

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Nice work mate. I like good home made anvils.

 

Another method for a hardy hole with the gear you have would be drill the hole as you have, thenweld 4 pieces of f/b corner to corner using the form of your hardy tool as a mandrel, pit it in a lathe and machine the o/d round to about 5 thou interferance and prep one end, then tap it in and fully weld the top.

As i said great job.

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Are you going to heat treat it?



It folded over the home made awl I tried to punch it with, so I may just hard face it. That way I won't have to wiry about the weld.

If resear h shows that the weld material is compatible with the 1045 for a heat treat, I will send it out for heat treat.

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Nice work mate. I like good home made anvils.

Another method for a hardy hole with the gear you have would be drill the hole as you have, thenweld 4 pieces of f/b corner to corner using the form of your hardy tool as a mandrel, pit it in a lathe and machine the o/d round to about 5 thou interferance and prep one end, then tap it in and fully weld the top.
As i said great job.


I have seen something similar to what you describe. Thanks for the Info.

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What are you going to use for the base?

I was planning on welding a 24"X 3/4"oval plate to the bottom, with holes drilled to lag it down to the Stump. I was concerned about it affecting the rebound, but there is a lot of steel between the hammer and a loose bottom plate. It probably won't ring right, but that is aesthetics.  

 

I was going to weld the piece I cut out as an upsetting block.

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A little closer. Lots of hand work. 

 

I had a small local welding shop cut out under the hardy, and weld it on as a upsetting block. They cut out a base plate and welded it on as well.

 

Can those guys weld or what! and to think I almost welded it myself.

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Horn shaped, Face leveled and radius added to heavy use area. Hardy squared out to 1 inch and radius added.  Just about ready for heat treat.

 

Been pounding out knives from large bearings on a RR track. I can't wait to use something with some mass behind it!

 

I am not sure how much weight the 3/4" X 1' X 2' base plate added, but it was 280 lbs before it was added. I am guessing 310 to 330 lbs. Face is 18" X 4 1/16"

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How about doing a rebound test...before and after...heat treatment.

 

Many of us are very interested in your project. It has been well constructed.

 

BTW....1045, according to some info....does not like welding. So now time will tell.

 

 

Carry on

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How about doing a rebound test...before and after...heat treatment.

 

Many of us are very interested in your project. It has been well constructed.

 

BTW....1045, according to some info....does not like welding. So now time will tell.

 

 

Carry on

I have to admit, when I first came into possession of this 1045 plate I was concerned about how a welded horn and upsetting block would work. I was afraid of the welds cracking, or failing. I considered hard facing. The problem is the cost. Also, I am not sure which will give the best rebound, hard facing, or full heat treating.

 

I am curious why some believe that 1045 doesn't like welding. With no Chromium, medium carbon, and between 60 and 90 points of Manganese, I thought it would be safe. Historically, isn't 1045 one of the traditional steels used as a face plate for forge welding a face plate to an anvil?

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David,

 

I will do the rebound testing, or I should say, I will have a more experienced blacksmith do it for me, and will post the results. To be honest, I am so tired of using a RR track,

that I was tempted to start using this anvil soft. A black smith friend, Mark Henderson, talked me out of it, and is loaning me his Russian cast steel harbor freight back up anvil until I can get mine back from the heat treat. Mark was president of the local blacksmithing association for several years. I will have him do the testing.

 

I have a lot to learn about everything, including what gives good rebound. I had hoped that the good sectional density of this plate would help. 

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I can't get to my anvil to my welder to do some cosmetic work and grinding before I have it heat treated. Tired of working on my RR track, I hauled one of my 3"X8"X36" forklift tines to my forge, did a quick prep on it, and started working again.

 

Much better. Actually, really nice! I was fortunate to find such wide thick tines. They weigh about 225 lbs each. I am not sure what the steel is, but it is about perfect for my hammer. (Actually, my sons hammer.)

 

Hear are some pictures. 

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I would be very proud to own that anvil. You did a outstanding job on it. You did Great job on the welding. That anvil will last past the end of time. :wub:

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I have to admit, when I first came into possession of this 1045 plate I was concerned about how a welded horn and upsetting block would work. I was afraid of the welds cracking, or failing. I considered hard facing. The problem is the cost. Also, I am not sure which will give the best rebound, hard facing, or full heat treating.

 

I am curious why some believe that 1045 doesn't like welding. With no Chromium, medium carbon, and between 60 and 90 points of Manganese, I thought it would be safe. Historically, isn't 1045 one of the traditional steels used as a face plate for forge welding a face plate to an anvil?

1045 was not around when they forge welded faces on anvils.  If memory serves they used mostly blister steel and later cast steel with the carbon content being higher than .40%  Blister steel in my experience when properly hardened is very hard stuff.  The numbering system for steel is a 20th century invention. Forge welded faces on anvils died out in the early 1900's for the most part. Nice build by the way :)

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1045 was not around when they forge welded faces on anvils.  If memory serves they used mostly blister steel and later cast steel with the carbon content being higher than .40%  Blister steel in my experience when properly hardened is very hard stuff.  The numbering system for steel is a 20th century invention. Forge welded faces on anvils died out in the early 1900's for the most part. Nice build by the way :)

Thanks for the info Timothy. I may have got a false impression when I read of 1045 plates being forge welded on new anvils, and Pedinghuas

being drop forged out of 1045.

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That is some seriously nice work!

 

Whoever did the welds certainly knows their business.  

 

I wouldn't worry too much about heat-treat until you see how it takes the hammering.  It will be a long, long time before you see any swayback develop.

 

On the tine anvil, it will work better if you stand it on end and use the short face to pound on.  Having mass directly under the hammer is what makes the difference.

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That is some seriously nice work!

 

Whoever did the welds certainly knows their business.  

 

I wouldn't worry too much about heat-treat until you see how it takes the hammering.  It will be a long, long time before you see any swayback develop.

 

On the tine anvil, it will work better if you stand it on end and use the short face to pound on.  Having mass directly under the hammer is what makes the difference.

The owner of the company welded it himself. He wanted to trade work on the anvil for blacksmithing items. He liked my knives,

and his best friends father was a blacksmith when he was growing up. I won't grind these welds. They are a thing of beauty!

 

I understand sectional density for the tine. But it is already 8 inches tall the way it is. I will pound on it this way for a while, then grind off the torched end and try it standing up. So much better than what I was using already.

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That is some seriously nice work!

 

Whoever did the welds certainly knows their business.  

 

I wouldn't worry too much about heat-treat until you see how it takes the hammering.  It will be a long, long time before you see any swayback develop.

 

On the tine anvil, it will work better if you stand it on end and use the short face to pound on.  Having mass directly under the hammer is what makes the difference.

Even light taps on the face of the anvil leaves dents.

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Waiting while I make enough coke to stress relieve and harden. Today I look for a suitable place to build the forge and quench.

 

 

 

 

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It is a joy to see the process that old door stop is becoming, well done Archerdan. 

Thank you for your help. We would only have the forklift tines without you. I will begin stress relieving in about 6 hours. There is a hickory long bow I hope to be shooting by Friday. ;-)

 

I have to forge some arrow heads!

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