JGRAFF

My newly mounted vise and others

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I thought everyone would get some enjoyment out of these, so I’d like to share. The first is my newly mounted post vise. I love it and it is xxxxxxxxx! I just got done fixing the mount. The only problem I have is the screw is pretty striped when the jaws are opened past 5-6 inch. So it will need to be repaired soon. Also i want to add some leveling screws to the legs. My garage floor is nowhere near flat.
 
The second is another 5.5" jaw vise. But this thing is completely seized. I haven’t had a ton of time to fool with it. But i think some long soaking and maybe a torch and a BFH will be in its near future.
 
Next is a cute little thing. Not very practical for anything I do, but still nice to have.

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The table mount looks like it's a good working station. I really like having plenty of room to set tools at the vise. Two things jump out at me though. First, can you do HARD bending with it without the table moving? When I say hard, I mean cheater pipe HARD bending. The other thing I'd do differently is extend it out from the table or mount it parallel to a side so I could use a twisting wrench horizontally without being limited by the table. I would put foot pads on the legs.

 

Those are my preferences for what THAT's worth.<grin> I like the quality of your work, clean, well joined, large without being PITA large. If it does skate in use, here's a little trick to keep it where you want it. Turn it upside down, squirt a little gob of silicone calking on the foot pads, wipe it really thin with a rag, leaving a smear over the whole pad and let it dry. This is how the Alaska Marine Highway guys keep plates, cups, etc. on the tables in heavy seas and believe me they see HEAVY seas. This trick will work for anything you don't want skidding on a concrete, linoleum, etc. floor, counter, etc.

 

Well done.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Very Nice.    Below are a couple of thumb nails showing how I use ballast to keep one of my benches from moving around in use.   This method works well,  The angles on the bottom make it easy to move the bench out of the way using pipe rollers when extra space is needed

 

 

post-14777-0-25277700-1369860723_thumb.j    post-14777-0-36987300-1369860692_thumb.j

 

 

One other thing.  Some of the older leg vices have coiled square wire threads brazed into the screw box cylinder rather than machined threads. I would use heat as a last resort to loosen the frozen screw in your other vice.   Being aware that the threads could be brazed in, you might imagine the unfortunate result of using heat on the outside chance that your vice is constructed that way

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Thanks! The table top is a nice size (24" x 24" x .25"). it was a vibration fixture I built a couple of years ago at work. When the testing was done they let me take it home. Its been sitting in the corner collecting dust. So I cut the really short legs off and one of the four walls, built the frame under it and mounted my vise.

The table is pretty heavy and having a large footprint helps with bending. But, "hard" bending is not happening. I was thinking about anchoring down or just hanging a ton of weight on it, but that silicone trick might just work!

Any other ideas and or suggestions on getting this other vise freed up?

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Greetings JG,

 

You might try welding a 3in flat bar square to the bottom tube legs to increase the floor surface area contact...  Add a couple more bars and load it with bricks like Knots said..   You are going to need weight with that size vise...

 

Forge on ..

 

 

Jim

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With a large vise I've had a table ballasted with twice that amount in much denser steel move before.  For my most *UMPH* vise I have it securely mounted to a telephone pole that's buried 5' deep and concreted in---it's one of the roof supports for my shop and if I'm really walloping on it you can here the sheet metal sides and roof sing along.

 

Note that these types of vises usually didn't have an extreme amount of throw, it may have damaged the ends when someone tried to hold something too large and hunkered down on the bar.

 

 

As for unsticking---did you soak it daily in a good penetrating oil for a month or two before tring to work it free?

 

You can also use heat below the melting point of braze to try to dehydrate the rust--will be smoky and smelly after a long soak; but I usually do it in that order anyway

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I do not know if your vice is seized by corrosion, just saw these videos and I think they may eventually help you

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Your second vise screw box is cast iron. I have seen many this shape. All of the cast iron boxes I have seen are one piece cast (box, threads, shoulder all one piece). It is posable that the threads were stripped and some one bored out the box clean, then braised in new threads. But very unlikely. I think it is a safe bet that the entire box is cast iron.

 

Has anyone ever seen brazed threads in a cast iron box?

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Only seen it as a repair and in this day and age it would be very rare.

 

That second vise also has the shape of a filers vise although it  is much more heavily built than most filer vises. 

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I noticed that the welded disc at the bottom under the foot of the vice is not welded all the way around only on the sides . when you start hammering on it it will crack the welds on the sides it is inevitable as it happens all the time . Example : when welding a "T" if you only weld one side of the T joint you can hammer on the opposite site of the weld and it normally will not break the weld , However if you hit the side with the weld it will fall off (even with a good solid weld )  So by welding the disc all the way around you avoid Breaking the welds on the sides . also a small ring of pipe welded to the top will keep the foot from Drifting/sliding to the side or off the disc causing the bolts at the upper mounting point undue stress and lopping off a toe when /if they fail.

 

Best Regards

 

Sam

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I understand your concern but it's not a disk. Its a forged ring or collar I made to snugly fit the foot of the leg. The picture is kind of deceiving. I have some leveling feet on order now. I will take some better pictures when I get them.

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I understand your concern but it's not a disk. Its a forged ring or collar I made to snugly fit the foot of the leg. The picture is kind of deceiving. I have some leveling feet on order now. I will take some better pictures when I get them.

 

Sorry if you say so it does not show up as so on my Alienware 18.5 Monitor . good job on the build .

 

 

Sam

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Thanks! The table top is a nice size (24" x 24" x .25"). it was a vibration fixture I built a couple of years ago at work. When the testing was done they let me take it home. Its been sitting in the corner collecting dust. So I cut the really short legs off and one of the four walls, built the frame under it and mounted my vise.

The table is pretty heavy and having a large footprint helps with bending. But, "hard" bending is not happening. I was thinking about anchoring down or just hanging a ton of weight on it, but that silicone trick might just work!

Any other ideas and or suggestions on getting this other vise freed up?

IMO I would drill holes in the top of the plate where the legs are and filling them with sand and oil, it will dampen sound and add a suprizing amount of weight, then you can thread the holes and plug them with bolts and top it off as the sand compresses over time.

Josh

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