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Hey guys Cota here again,

I was wondering if this anvil, the petter wright I found not to long ago. If its worth picking up for the price. ($275) it's 1-1-2 or 1-1-1 you can't exactly read the last number. He claims its around 120 pounds and it looks to be in good condition from the picture I have of it. To pick it up it'll cost my about $120 dollars to drive down to where its at Albuquerque New Mexico, USA I don't really want to pay $275 for it although probably worth that much considering the weight and visual condition from what I can tell. So I need some advice on it. Yay or nay here's a picture if I post it correctly maybe. Also if any of y'all have an anvil that you're willing to part with to a beginner blacksmith please reply with info. Thanks for the help have a nice day!post-39317-0-96159300-1367356630_thumb.jpost-39317-0-96159300-1367356630_thumb.j

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looks good and sharp but idk what is under the paint on the top of the face check if it has any repairs or if it has been welded at all and I think 275 is ok but try to take something lower

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thanks! i'll try and get the guy down to $200 to $150 so i can actually afford to get up there 

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An anvil for less than $3/pound?  That's a good price.  To get a mint-condition anvil for less than $3/pound is a very, very good price!

 

The edges, cutting table and horn all look like they've never seen a day's work.  Maybe it's the photos, but those are some seriously good lines on that anvil.

My only worry is that anvil looks brand new.  I'm not saying that an "as new" anvil couldn't be found, and very few hucksters would go through the effort of welding up any dings in the horn and cutting table, so it might be a very very good buy.

 

From my perspective, I would honestly consider the purchase.  A small anvil is a joy to work with, and is even nicer when it comes time to move.  Put that anvil on a heavy stand and bolt it down solidly, and it will act like a 300# anvil.  Brian Breazele does most of his work on a 150# anvil, and he can really make metal move!

 

I would consider the drive down there simply as an excuse to get away for the day.  If the anvil is sound, has a good ring and no evidence of welding up the corners, it is very much worth the investment and you'll be able to recoup your money should you decide to sell it in a year or two.  Lighter anvils are always in demand, and one in perfect condition is very rare.

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An anvil for less than $3/pound?  That's a good price.  To get a mint-condition anvil for less than $3/pound is a very, very good price!

 

The edges, cutting table and horn all look like they've never seen a day's work.  Maybe it's the photos, but those are some seriously good lines on that anvil.

My only worry is that anvil looks brand new.  I'm not saying that an "as new" anvil couldn't be found, and very few hucksters would go through the effort of welding up any dings in the horn and cutting table, so it might be a very very good buy.

 

From my perspective, I would honestly consider the purchase.  A small anvil is a joy to work with, and is even nicer when it comes time to move.  Put that anvil on a heavy stand and bolt it down solidly, and it will act like a 300# anvil.  Brian Breazele does most of his work on a 150# anvil, and he can really make metal move!

 

I would consider the drive down there simply as an excuse to get away for the day.  If the anvil is sound, has a good ring and no evidence of welding up the corners, it is very much worth the investment and you'll be able to recoup your money should you decide to sell it in a year or two.  Lighter anvils are always in demand, and one in perfect condition is very rare.

thanks man i'll try and get a ride up there! i think i will be coming home with an anvil. the guy said he doesnt know when it was manufactured so it could very well be new idk if peter wright is still in business but maybe ( new as in last 10 year or more haha)

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The weight on the side of the anvil is, you say, 1-1-1 or 1-1-2.  That's hundredweight measuring, not simple pounds, and means the anvil is heavier than 111#.  The first number (1) is equal to 112 pounds.  The second number (1) is equal to 28 pounds.  The third number (1 or 2 or 3 or 5?), whatever it might be, is actual pounds.  So, it would be 112 + (1x28) + whatever that last number is.  So the nominal weight is 140lbs and the actual weight won't be known until you put it on a scale.  Due to casting magic, the stamped weight is usually a bit heavier than the actual weight, but I wouldn't expect it to lose 20# to chipping, rust, whatever.

 

If it rings like a bell and the looks good, jump on it!!!

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I'd jump on it.  A new PW...haha, that one looks great for something that's at least a century old.  If you can get a better side picture you can have a better idea of the date.  Here is some info I found somewhere online.

 

"It is difficult to age a PW after 1860 when they went to the now classic London pattern. If it just says PETER WRIGHT PATENT, then likely 1860-late 1880s. If ENGLAND is added, then late 1880 to early 1900s.

The logo was stamped on in parts. Perhaps when someone did your's they simply forgot where to put the SOLID WROUGHT circle or the weight. Occasionally stamps were put on upside down.

Yes, on Peter Wright anvils. Might be an inspector mark or perhaps it meant it was approved for export. A classic sign of a post-1860 PW are small ledges on the front and back feet.

You may have a very early PW since in 1860 on their typical logo was (stacked): PETER WRIGHT PATENT. Then SOLID WROUGHT in a circle usually with the middle weight number stamped in it. About 1910 they added ENGLAND under PATENT.

 

Fairly certain Peter Wright did start putting serial numbers on their late production anvils. They started putting ENGLAND on their anvils about 1910 and are thought to have gone out of business about the 1930s. "

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Hate to be the bearer of bad news but that anvil was sold months ago. The SAWBA website is never up to date.

Sorry

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Hate to be the bearer of bad news but that anvil was sold months ago. The SAWBA website is never up to date.
Sorry

Awh really!?!? Man that really puts a rain on my parade! When I asked about it a week ago he said it was still available :( well I guess I'll have to find one else where. Any ideas?

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Cota-

I'm not sure who you could have talked to? As you can see on the SWABA website that anvil was posted on December 15, when word got out that one of the old members was getting rid 

of his tools, it probably looked like a hoard of locusts hit his house. I talked to him 2 days after the posting and there wasn't anything left. Be patient and ask everyone you meet if they have an anvil.

I know in some of the old scrap yards, like in Clovis, NM you can occasionally find anvils or pieces of rail road track.

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Cota-
I'm not sure who you could have talked to? As you can see on the SWABA website that anvil was posted on December 15, when word got out that one of the old members was getting rid
of his tools, it probably looked like a hoard of locusts hit his house. I talked to him 2 days after the posting and there wasn't anything left. Be patient and ask everyone you meet if they have an anvil.
I know in some of the old scrap yards, like in Clovis, NM you can occasionally find anvils or pieces of rail road track.

I don't remember the name of the person but he said it was still currently available and that was not to long ago. But thanks for the tip. I've already found another I'm calling on it tomorrow and going to have it shipped to me. It's actually cheaper to have it shipped then to drive which is odd. I used to live in clovise thanks for the advice ill look there too!

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