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I Forge Iron

Tooling Forge Design


Adam C. ToolSmith

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Hello I Forge Iron,

 

Just wondering can anybody who is experienced with COKE forges, Make any suggestions as to improving the forge design. I want the forge to be efficient because COKE and COAL are both quite expensive and rare here in AUS. The forge will be used for tool making, Items such as hammers, axes, spanners, punches, chisels and other tool repairs. ect. 

 

 The Forge design, 

 

1-30-20134-59-57PM_zpsdc72fdeb.png

 

The blue parts are fire bricks, The grey being a 5mm steel plate cut to 1035mmx920mm

Steel flat stock of 75mmx3mm are to be welded to the sides to stop the bricks from moving. 

 

The fire bricks being 76mmx230mmx115mm  H x L x W

 

The Fire pot being used is an old Vulcan Extra heavy duty

 

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The Tuyere

A737F430-7EFF-48FE-8598-113CDDDD81E3-182

 

The Firepot - Dont mind my feet ahaha, bad photo.

B168719B-E199-469E-B840-8D2572E4963D-182

 

The fire pot is 13" x 12" and 4" deep. 

 

 

The blower is an old jumping castle blower that i picked up for $20 at a flea market.

 

I have a http://www.vayrotec.com.au/525k-motor-speedcontroller-p-769.html To slow the blower down to a more usable level. 

 

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I'm thinking of mounting it to the underneath of the table having the outlet directly in line with the Tuyere inlet, with about 12" of space between the Inlet and outlet. 

 

I've not any experience with tooling forges or any forges large enough to be efficient and quick at heating thick bar. The largest sections of steel i will be heating is approximately 60 - 80 mm perhaps more. So if there is anyone with experience in this matter please any and all help will be appreciated. 

 

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My advise, as usual, is to visit and use as many forges belonging to other smiths as possible... before... building your own forge.  That way you have a better idea what works for *you*, and not myself or anyone else.

 

That said, it looks like you have an excellent start with an excellent firepot, tuyer, and blower.  I'm not clear on what you are planning to do with the firebrick.  Having the blower straight in-line with the tuyer's air intake might result in embers blowing back into your blower, so if you look at other setups I believe you will usually see some offset, sometimes a lot of offset.  Sharp 90 degree turns will reduce the airflow into the forge, so gentle bends tend to be a good idea. 

 

Classic forges using the type of firepot and blower you have do well with a 2' by 2' or a 2' by 4' forge table. 

 

Check out the information on this forum on the three zones of a coal/coke fire, as it is very important.

 

With the parts you have, I am not sure where the firebrick will work, or even if they are needed with your firepot. 

 

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I've been using only coke for 28 years. That being said.... forget about the rheostat to control the air, use an air gate, the blower will run free air without issues and the pull of the lever will increase or decrease the flow. The tuyere isn't  necessary, I have an air blower,air gate, right angle up to the fire, with a thick grate, right angle to the ash clean out. I can melt 3" sq. by accident. Don't restrict the air, cut it off with the gate....I hate to say it , BUT...that fire pot may ( will ) get red hot so keep that in mind when making the frame. Coke isn't like coal, it's way hotter 

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I've been using only coke for 28 years. That being said.... forget about the rheostat to control the air, use an air gate, the blower will run free air without issues and the pull of the lever will increase or decrease the flow. The tuyere isn't  necessary, I have an air blower,air gate, right angle up to the fire, with a thick grate, right angle to the ash clean out. I can melt 3" sq. by accident. Don't restrict the air, cut it off with the gate....I hate to say it , BUT...that fire pot may ( will ) get red hot so keep that in mind when making the frame. Coke isn't like coal, it's way hotter 

Ok, yeah I've used this pot before and it does get red hot, Though because I didn't have enough airflow i would only get a tiny tiny fire in the pot, could'nt raise it above that. 

 

Not sure, i would need plans on how to make an air gate. or at least need to have a good look at how it is made, we cant buy equipment like that over here. at least not to my knowledge anyway :(

 

 

My advise, as usual, is to visit and use as many forges belonging to other smiths as possible... before... building your own forge.  That way you have a better idea what works for *you*, and not myself or anyone else.

 

That said, it looks like you have an excellent start with an excellent firepot, tuyer, and blower.  I'm not clear on what you are planning to do with the firebrick.  Having the blower straight in-line with the tuyer's air intake might result in embers blowing back into your blower, so if you look at other setups I believe you will usually see some offset, sometimes a lot of offset.  Sharp 90 degree turns will reduce the airflow into the forge, so gentle bends tend to be a good idea. 

 

Classic forges using the type of firepot and blower you have do well with a 2' by 2' or a 2' by 4' forge table. 

 

Check out the information on this forum on the three zones of a coal/coke fire, as it is very important.

 

With the parts you have, I am not sure where the firebrick will work, or even if they are needed with your firepot. 

ok The fire brick will create a basin for the forge like this, 

 

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G'day Bobwire,

Can you get hold of coal 'fines'?  Stuff that is the next size up from sand.  Mix it with water and build up the size and shape of hearth you need (with air pipe into it), and there you have the ultimate shape for the job in hand.

post-8233-098620400%201282434114_thumb.j

 

The picture is of a fire I built to pre and post heat the casting for welding- large.  With this same forge I can make a hearth the diameter of any tin can I care to find.  The tin is a plug for forming the wet coal ('slack').

The other fun benefit with playing around like this, (apart from the childish mud pie fun!) is that the damp compacted slack turns into homemade coke ('breeze'); I've got to about 3" thick with some fires. 

Feel free to pop your location under your avatar (and post in the thread 'OZ roll call' in subforum 'Everything Else' which is under 'General Discussions').

Iif you can get to Rozelle, Sydney, I can show you the forge in the pic.

cheers,

AndrewOC

 

cheers

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Mate you need to fill out your profile so that people can help you out a bit more.

Coke is available and depending where you live more available then other places. Google Coalcliff in NSW, If your close to that place you can get coke by the ton. Will charge you around 50c per Kg, which is really good compared to charcoal around 2-3 bucks a Kg.

As stated use a gate not a fan voltage regulator, simpler and the fin likes being restricted anyways, kinda built for it.

Good luck with it all, can be a big much when starting out. Drop location and see who is around you.

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Not sure, i would need plans on how to make an air gate. or at least need to have a good look at how it is made, we cant buy equipment like that over here. at least not to my knowledge anyway :(

 

Airgates / slide valves are easily made in various ways here are some pics of ones we make and use, they have a ratchet type handle so they will stay in position easily.

 

All you need are two flanges/plates to fit from tue, and blower, (our sizes  100 x 6 x 100mm with a 50mm diameter hole cut through on centre line for air flow)

 

Two spacers to fit to top and bottom (our sizes 20 x 6 x 100mm)

 

Slider plate (our sizes 80 x 5 mm x 200mm)  with a hole 50mm diameter through for the main airflow, if using coke, we put a 6 to 8mm diameter hole through to allow forge to tick over when gate is shut between operations.

 

Ratchet arm is 30 x12 x to suit your arrangement, with a couple of plates welded on to form the fork for linkage to slider. the cut out ratchet arrangement were just holes drilled adjacent, near to the edge of the arm and then stock removed to centrelines of the holes.  We also fit a cross bar to give a T handle at the operating end to lift it by.

 

post-816-0-41406500-1360149292_thumb.jpg

 

post-816-0-37155500-1360149332_thumb.jpg

 

post-816-0-01529300-1360149368_thumb.jpg

 

post-816-0-88707700-1360149387_thumb.jpg

 

post-816-0-02130900-1360149437_thumb.jpg

 

post-816-0-64221400-1360149475_thumb.jpg

 

I hope this helps, I also think Dave Custer has details of an air gate in his recent post on his new forge.

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