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hinges for the wood stove


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I put in a smoke shelf today.

 

Jonathan: I make a hinge-barrel tool. The one I made for these was 1x1/4-inch flat bar. Will try to get a picture of the tooling. The hinge barrel is made a tad small and true bored with a drill bit.

 

I'd like to see the tool.  Thanks Dave!

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Jonathan, I forgot to get the picture of the tool tonight. I'll try to remember to get it tomorrow!

 

 

Here are some updates on the stove. I welded a smoke shelf / spark arrestor on the inside. Then I made the chimney pipe collar, welded it to the top plate, cut the chimney hole, and ground it all down.

 

Next I welded 2-inch flat bar all the way around the lid to create a stepped-down lip. I got the lid welded on today.

 

After the lid was welded on, my dad and I flipped the stove and put it on a roller cart, so that I can get to the stove bottom to attach the legs. I welded some plates to the stove bottom where the legs will go to help distribute the stove weight in a wider area than just the leg stock diameter.

 

The legs are made from 1.5-inch solid round. I am forging a sort of simple "claw-foot" design for the legs. This is done by creating a justified upset on the ends, and then using a small diameter fuller to creat the claw-foot look. I've got two feet done, and will finish them up tomorrow.

 

I finished the damper-slide assembly and it all works well.

 

I also wrapped 1/4-inch round bar around the square pipe that is the handle guide. Thanks for the suggestions and ideas John B!

 

Finally I bent the backside of the handle around so that it latches properly, and I also welded a stop so that when the handle is in the open position it catches at a good angle.

 

Picture time!

 

Here is a picture of the bottom with the leg support plates welded on. You can also see the lip around the top (which is currently on the bottom.)

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Here is one of the feet! Nothing fancy, but I am pleased with the way they are turning out. They are taking six heats with a striker to help with the fullering!

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Ok now! Back to the door!

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Here is the damper slide!

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Here it is in the open position!

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And finally here is a close up of the wrapped handle guide!

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Got the legs welded on yesterday! We've started the buffing!

 

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Here is the stop for the door handle.

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Here is a close-up of the feet. They were made to resemble a "claw-foot." The material used was 1.5-inch solid mild steel. The first two took 6 heats and the last two took 5. 3-heats to upset, 1 or 2  heats to fuller in the claws and check back the upset, and 1 heat to cut.

 

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Here are the four of them before they were attached.

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It's warmer today so I'll be working on painting it.

 

P.S. I still forgot to get that picture Jonathan, but I will remember today!

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Dave,

 

I heat my house with a wood stove, store bought approoved and all. Its made of plate. I dont know what sort of  plate. And I do not trust that plate.

 

I worry that if I heat the stove too much, (ie. get it red when we get —30ºC [—22ºF] for 4 or 5 days and with high winds), that the door would not close any more, that the whole stove would warp, twist whatever a heated plate may do when realy heated. It did not happen yet eventhough I did heat it quite a bit on  few occasions this winter.

 

What kind of steel is your plate and do you share my worry?

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I think the stove would look better if you attached angle Iron on all for corners and put a lot of domed head rivets in it. I know that it is already welded and the angle Iron would be more for show. But I sure think old riveted items look great! Looks like a handy stove.

 

Mackenzie

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YVES: We used a wood stove for several years to heat our mobile home in Georgia. It was a store-bought fisher, and was 3/16-inch or 1/4-inch plate. We ran that thing pretty darn hot sometimes, and we weren't the first owners. It got used frequently but never warped or changed in any way.

 

The current stove that is in our house was given to us! It was in pitiful shape. It was made from something like 16 gauge sheet metal. It was half rusted out half burnt out, and warped like crazy. The door still shut, but did not seal well. We encased the entire old stove with 3/16-inch plate. I fill the entire box up with wood in the evenings. It has never warped or changed.

 

The current stove I'm building is 1/4-inch plate steel. I do not foresee any problems with warpage.

 

Plate and sheet metal are a pain when heated and cooled. They do not retain their flatness in the least. Even when clamped down, you can still have a piece warp when it has been heated and cooled. However, thicker stove (3/16-inch and 1/4-inch in my experience,) does not seem to be affected.

 

I assume it has something to do with the fact that it has support on all four sides. There is just too much resistance from too many angles to allow the steel to warp.

 

It probably would Martin! Good sugestion. I used a favorite of mine which is put the corners together with a little gap in them. Then put a piece of 1/2-inch round in the corner and weld it all from the backside. It finished the corners out nicely, and does not require any grinding or slag removal as the weld is all interior.

That last run of rivets inside the box would be a pain to get at though! LOL

 

I got your picture this evening Jonathan and now my uploader won't work! I'll try tomorrow afternoon!

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Here are the pictures of the hinge barrel tool! I finally got my picture uploader working.

 

This one shows the positioning of the tool and the hinge piece in the vise. The hinge stock is scarfed on the end and then bent at a sharp 90 with enough material past the bend to allow material for the hinge barrel and about an inch or so for welding.

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Here is a close up of the hinge barrel tool. The blob is a rough forging of the approximate size of the hinge barrel. It's just something to form the barrel around.

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The way it works is, you clamp it all in the vise and bend the hinge stock around until it hits the vise. Then take it out and nock out the hinge barrel tool. Place a piece of stock in the hinge barrel that is the size of the hinge barrel. (3/8-inch barrel = 3/8-inch stock) Then close the barrel up around this piece of stock, tightly making sure everything is alligned. Open the scarf slightly to allow the piece of stock to fall out and allow flux between the area to be welded. Flux and then weld. I like my first welding blow to be kind of a pulling hammer blow, pulling the hinge barrel slighly tighter than it was. This allows a drill bit to clean out and true up the barrel.

 

Hopefully that all makes sense. It's a simple process only involving a few heats in decent stock sizes.

 

1 heat to scarf and bend

1 heat in the vise with the barrel tool

1 heat to close the barrel, knock out the sizing pin, and flux

1 heat to weld

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Thank you for the illustration, pictures, and instructions Dave, as always, very thorough and illustrated well.

 

This is exactly what I was looking for, I'm getting ready to build my blacksmith shop and figured it should be some sort of crime if I were to go to Lowes and purchase hinges for my shop doors.......they may not open well when I get finished, but at least I can say I tried  :D !

 

Do you just fuller the shoulders in the flat stock for the decorative spade ends on your straps?  I really need to build that guillotine fuller soon.  

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The spade ends are called dutch hearts! The 1/2-inch top and bottom fullers are used to endent the metal. However the curvature that leads into the tip and the hollow area in the spade, by the "stem" are forged with a hammer and mandrel or sharp horn. (That hollow area is called the cusp.) After you've begun spreading the material you alternate between spreading, and placing the back of the "spade" on the sharp horn and hitting the area by the point with the hammer!

 

It's a REAL pain in the neck until you get used to it.

 

If you want to, you can come up sometime and and I'll walk you through the hinge making process and help you make the tools too. There are other finials as well like the bean finial (looks like a kidney bean,) and a round finial. Just let me know ahead of time so I can make sure I have the stock on hand!

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Well to conclude this saga!

 

We installed the stove today. It got 6 coats of high heat black paint before installation. It was a pain to move, but we made it.

 

It really goes well on the hearth. (we built the hearth more for a stove this size. The other stove looked out of place and we planned for it to be temporary.)

 

I put all of the firebrick in. That pretty much went according to plan, although I did not account for spacing when I added the smoke shelf. This made it to where I couldn't really get a full firebrick in the back middle. You'll see a shorter broken brick in the back middle there. I had to cut several brick with a masonry chisel and that worked well.

 

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Here you can see the smoke shelf! It seems like it's doing it's job well!

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It will take a while to learn all of the quirks and figure out how to run the stove properly. It's going now and is doing well! I want to raise the chimney another three feet to increase draw. (Get it above the ridge line!) The draw has never been awesome but it hasn't been a problem with the old stove as it had two doors. When the load door was open the ash door got closed, and the other way around. That way, it always had draw. However, with a single larger door, the smoke wants to come out as much as go up. Increasing draw by getting the pipe above the ridgeline would be a plus!

 

Thanks to all for following this thread!

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Not quite sure whether to say it looks so hot, or so cool

 

 

I was once working in a class setting. There was a woman in the class, a couple forges down from me. We were working on different projects but using the same power hammer, and so we had to watch out for one another. Obviously we couldn't both come out of the forge at the same time with a hot piece of metal.

 

How do you ask someone if they are about to swing a hot piece out of the forge?

 

In the rush of the moment I ALMOST yelled across the blacksmith shop to a woman, "ARE YOU HOT?" I got about half of the word "are" out of my mouth and decided to rephrase! :D

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Dave ,

      If you continue to have trouble with it drawing after you raise the top of the chimney, I'd check two things, the diameter of your flue pipe looks small for size of fire box and what is the opening space on your smoke shelf ? 

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The volume on the smoke of entrance to the smoke shelf if plenty....I made sure of that.

 

The flue pipe is 6-inch. I would have preferred 8-inch but the entire system, including the triple wall stuff through the roof and the insulation box through the ceiling are all 6-inch. I could always put a decreasing plate just inside the door to decrease the door opening. I do not believe this would affect loading, and it would be handy for ash build-up. I allowed a lip for the ash, but it is on the small side. I have noticed that in just burning a fire last night!

 

the stove is really tight! I put an oak chunk in last night at 10 A.M. and it was still in one piece at 5 A.M.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Dave,

Looks nice. I have to second JohnB's suggestion regarding the guide tube for the latch handle - but that would be for your next stove. Also regarding the handle it looks like it will be terminating somewhere in close proximity of the stove's heat surface - maybe it would be better to have had it angled differently and had the handle portion more loosely spaced like that of the old parlor stove lifting handles - better cooling (looks like a tapered coil springs wound around the shaft of the lifter).

Overall, nice work.

-Charlie

Had to go back in and edit my post, which I made before seeing the last of your photos. (just deleted a bit about a impingement or baffle plate. Regarding you draft, how high above the roof line or nearby obstructions is the top of the flue?

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Dave,  If the taller pipe dosn't cure the draw, try bring the smoke shelf further forward closer to the door.  as long as the shelf, opening is the same area as the pipe.  This will help keep smoke from entering the room.   BTW nice looking stove!

 

 

Larry

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Dave,

Looks nice. I have to second JohnB's suggestion regarding the guide tube for the latch handle - but that would be for your next stove. Also regarding the handle it looks like it will be terminating somewhere in close proximity of the stove's heat surface - maybe it would be better to have had it angled differently and had the handle portion more loosely spaced like that of the old parlor stove lifting handles - better cooling (looks like a tapered coil springs wound around the shaft of the lifter).

Overall, nice work.

-Charlie

Had to go back in and edit my post, which I made before seeing the last of your photos. (just deleted a bit about a impingement or baffle plate. Regarding you draft, how high above the roof line or nearby obstructions is the top of the flue?

 

 

I did wrap the handle up in 1/4-inch round after JohnB's critiques there. My pipe currently is even with the ridge on the roof, and the prevailing winds usually come from over the roof. That's why I mentioned trying to up the height of the pipe.

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Watch the smoke from the chimney and the wind crossing the roof and ridge. You will I think want the top of the chimney above the wind so the wind lifts the smoke and carries it off.

 

We have out chimneys 3 feet taller than the peak of the roof. The furnace works well but the wood stove with a straight pipe is lazy in putting out smoke. A 24 inch section of added chimney made all the difference in the world and we now have to damper down the stove it draws so well.

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