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hinges for the wood stove


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I'm building a new wood stove for our house. It a 24-inch box made from 1/4-inch plate material. I forged some hinges for the door.

 

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Here is an overview of the stove before the front door plate was welded on.

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The hinges were made from 1/4x3/4 flat bar. Their primary fastening is rivets, although their is a tack weld that was more a temporary holder. The pintels are welded on. The entire thing is primarily cut-n-fab work so I wasn't concerned with traditional fastening. I just wanted to forge the hinges. They were forged entirely by hand and they took about an hour for both of the straps.

 

I made 14 pintels before I got two that I was happy with. I forged a couple of the dutch hearts as practice pieces first as well. Those are the 4th and 5th dutch hearts I've ever forged.

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This will be one fiery furnace... warming up lovely dutch hearts.

 

 

LOL That's funny! I've had a bit of experience with a couple young ladies (or rather young lady's dad's) and I wouldn't count on it any time soon! LOL

 

Phil! Nope I didn't! Just going for the head first dive approach this time. :D

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LOL That's funny! I've had a bit of experience with a couple young ladies (or rather young lady's dad's) and I wouldn't count on it any time soon! LOL

 

Phil! Nope I didn't! Just going for the head first dive approach this time. :D

So the rumors of double barrel shot guns and fathers in the backwoods of Kentucky are true?  :huh:

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So the rumors of double barrel shot guns and fathers in the backwoods of Kentucky are true?  :huh:

 

Well no shotguns yet.

 

Current track record with the ladies is:

 

Had a lady friend, she seemed to like me, said she did in many letters, then found out she had a boyfriend! "Now that ain't gonna fly!"

 

Second lady, got a definate "no go" from the dad! Never made it past him! :D

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Well here are some stove updates. I'd originally planned on this just being some pics of the hinges, but due to the response, I figured I'd see it through to the end. I'm taking the pictures anyway, might was well post 'em!

 

Here is the handle/door latch.

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It will get cleaned up before painting.

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I used this piece of pipe as the guide for the handle, and then forged the 5/8-inch square material down to round to where it just fit inside the pipe.

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Here is the interior frame that will hold the firebrick in place. The lower line of frames are welded in, while the upper line are removable so that broken fire-brick can be removed if/when needed.

 

That's all for now. I buggered up the damper on the door yesterday, pretty badly. I've got to try to fix that today, but more on that later!

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hi Dave, looking good as usual, but I am puzzled as to the choice of the square tube for the handle holder, it does not seem to look in keeping with the overall appearance, maybe its just me being picky?

 

I was also curious as to why you hinged the door from the right hand side, are your family left handed?

 

The reason I ask is that if feeding the fire when you are right handed, I tend to open the door wth my left hand, and then when I slide in the logs I use my right hand, less chance of burning my self on the door then.

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Just wondered why it was made that way, as custom makers, should we not question the 'norm' or reason(s) why an article is made in a certain way?

 

Originality is our speciality ! Cater for the individual clients needs = more commisions.

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As a life long user of wood stoves let me point out that external factors such as nearby walls, size of hearth, and where your stack your wood is have much bearing on which side you want the door on and if it's to be a right or left handed swing.  When you are winding up to ram home a 20# "overnighter" you want that door well out of the way of both the approach and the final thrust.  

 

Dave, I didn't know that it got cold enough in KY for wood stoves  ;)  You learn something every day here on IFI.  

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hi Dave, looking good as usual, but I am puzzled as to the choice of the square tube for the handle holder, it does not seem to look in keeping with the overall appearance, maybe its just me being picky?

 

I was also curious as to why you hinged the door from the right hand side, are your family left handed?

 

The reason I ask is that if feeding the fire when you are right handed, I tend to open the door wth my left hand, and then when I slide in the logs I use my right hand, less chance of burning my self on the door then.

 

Well as far as the tube goes: I am not aiming for a traditional appearence overal. I forged the hinges, simply because I wanted the experience of forging a set of hinges. I needed some sort of guide to keep the handle stiff and in position with a minimal amount of wobble. The square tube seemed like the logical solution and works like a charm.

There isn't much I can do to change it now, but what would you have suggested here? I always value your opinion highly, so even if I can't follow your suggestions this time, I can file them away for future reference in simlar situations.

 

The place that the stove is going is on an existing hearth. This stove will replace our smaller stove that we currently use. The wood is generally stacked on the left hand side of the stove. There is a wall about 4 to 5-feet away from the right hand side of the stove. Therefore it is natural for the door to swing on the right hand side of the stove, towards the wall and away from the wood stack. The door can swing a full 180 degrees so it will be completely out of the way while wood is being loaded.

 

Well, compared to Vermont Judson, it isn't too awful cold, but we've experience as much as two weeks of well bellow freezing temperature, at a time. Plus, we are originally from 50 miles south of Atlanta Georgia. This weather here is arctic compared to there! :D

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Hi Dave, I would have gone with a round tube, bored solid bar,or wrapped coil (similar to the handle) just a tad below the size of your "collar/ring" on the handle.

 

As to the "wondered why?" comment I was trying to determine if you had specifically designed this piece as Judson has said, taking into account the working situation, and to point out to others thinking of projects, how important it is to consider the reasons we make things like we do.

 

And now you have explained the situation it all makes sense, and is perfectly correct for the situation.

 

For most things we make, we have reasons for doing them as we do, this is not always apparent, and as a forum I wanted to highlight this for others less experienced who may benefit.

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Well as far as the tube goes: I am not aiming for a traditional appearance. I needed some sort of guide to keep the handle stiff and in position with a minimal amount of wobble. The square tube seemed like the logical solution and works like a charm.
 
There isn't much I can do to change it now, but what would you have suggested here? I always value your opinion highly, so even if I can't follow your suggestions this time, I can file them away for future reference in simlar situations.


There isn't much I can do to change it now.

 

I can suggest many ways to change it, OX/AC torch, grinder, hacksaw, and the list goes on. The deciding factor becomes one of time vs craftsmanship. On a cold night time is critical. On the hot summers evening in August the craftsmanship stands out.

 

Ok let us go with you NEED heat. If that were the case you would have put the stove in use already. If you need (lower case) heat, then put the stove in use ASAP. Either way you are warm. You are proud enough to build your own stove, build your own hinges, rather then go to the hard wear store buy a stove or buy hinges, so about May after things warm up and the stove is no longer needed, and you have collected several ideas for a door closure, you can replace the one you in place now. By August the craftsmanship will stand out.

 

It is always your call and sometimes a tough one to make.

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This stove is going to weigh about 500 pounds.....once it's in the house, it's there to stay for a LONG LONG time! I'm not fond of moving heavy objects frequently. What's done with the stove, must be done now. I've got an idea.....we'll see what it turns out. I'm working on the stove all day tomorrow!

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Do yourself a favor and build a smoke shelf.  With entance to the shelf above to door toward the front.  When you open the door it tends to draw smoke and flames much like a side draft chimmey.  So that the smoke, and flames don't enter the room.

 

Just my two cents

Larry

 

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