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So this is my forge that I have made. It has been made from 10mm side walls 100mm high, the base is a 5ml plate with a hole in the center, the legs are just 50x50ml square tube with end caps in them to stop the rust. I have taken a trucks brake plate as the firepot and to this I have attached a 50ml galvanised plumbing pipe leading to my waste hatch and to my valve to control the air inlet. In the background you can see my grandfathers 120amp oil cooled welder.

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The only concern I have with this build is that I had to weld the brake plate to the underside of the base plate as shown here.

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All I have left to do with this is to finish all the welds around the edges and connect up the blower that I have made out of a washing machine motor and a blower fan blade and Ill have my own smithy ready to fire up. What do you think?

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The only thing I can see is how are you going to get the metal in the fire to heat it? You're going to need to cut out some of the front and back walls ...

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Looks good - very substantial.  Mine looks similar to yours, without the... heft.

 

Like Pugman, I'd suggest you cut some slots/notches in the walls of the table, at 3, 6, and 9 o'clock, about even with the center of the firepot.  I put one in mine at 12 o'clock and never use it.  Slots don't have to be super huge to start out - maybe 2-3" wide and a few inches deep.  Start out with them on the small side - you can always make them bigger if you think you need to.

 

My $.02.

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I wonder why you did not set brake rotor in from top and just let it set in table... That seems to be the accepted thing to do....And If you ever have to replace it, it just lifts out....Anyway I just set mine in from the top...

All in all it looks good!... Let us know how it goes when fired up....

Dale

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The slots were coming, this design is actually a smaller version of my neighbors but I was vascilating as to whether i should do the slots or not. The firepot will be an interesting one, it might stay put or it might fall off, if it does ill just put it on top. I figured that since I was only really going to be using small pieces of stock that I wouldn't need the slots. The whole thing has a length of 75cm and is 45cm wide so there is also ample space. But as you have suggested in such a multitude it would be unwise to ignore. 

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Well, that's a dandy of a build!  The stoutness of it is great, in my opinion.

 

The worst thing you can do is think small, however.  Don't think for one minute that you'll only be using small stock, because you WILL get a wild hair one day soon and decide to try forging something big.  It happens to all of us.  The notches on the sides that allow you to access the fire more easily are necessary for when you're working on a lot of projects, even if those projects use small stock.

 

A ninety-degree bend in the middle of a length of stock is needed to make a wall-mounted plant hanger, for example.

 

Overall, you did great and I'm looking forward to seeing your work.

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IF you look in the gallery the chainmail pictures in miscellaneous and the last three forged knives are some of mine.

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Well here it is. ITS FINISHED! Ha ha yay. In the photo is my mentor Riaan Bredenkamp who has taught me all I know now and still is teaching me. Also Is the first firing of the forge. It works like a beauty.

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Great job and should work great. I like the thickness of you side walls.  Should last a long time.   I do like the no socks so some slag from the cutting torch can find it's way between your skin and shoe.  A real Hot foot.  

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I like the bucket of water as an ash dump. (grin)

You have the iron into the fire at a down slope. Add more coal and use the slots cut in the side of the forge to find the sweet spot in the fire ball.

How much coal in your forge

It is a 43 second video so you may want to watch it twice.

They are professional blacksmiths working against a clock to get the job done. So they build a fire to fit the project at hand ( a horse shoe). 

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That's not me, that's my mentor. Thanks for the advice on the coal, this was just a test to see if I was getting the correct temperatures. From now on I will be using the slots.

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I spotted those shoes too.I was cutting out an old bin a few yrs ago,the job I had at the time I wore high top rubber boots,with britches tucked in.

Ya'll can see where this is goin right? have you ever cut shure nuff rusty metal? on a ladder? with open top tight fittin boots?

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