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Hi guys,

here is a little guide on how to forge a rams head wall hook. I am not a professional instructor and this is just the way I do it currently.
I made a video and extracted the most important frames (full video on the bottom of the page):

1. Take a sqare bar (here 12mm) mild steel and draw down about 2 1/2 inches to half parent bar thickness

8231745861_030bec2c26_b.jpg


2. Split the set off section with a hot chissel along the middle

8232807828_718453e36a_b.jpg


3. Fuller inbetween the horns and clean up with a file

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8231744293_fa56be03c7_b.jpg


4. Taper both horns (fold one horn back so you can work on the other)

8232806256_6ca4a0fd54_b.jpg

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13. Forge the eyes using an eyeballpunch (To make the eyeballpunch forge a flat sqare punch, punch a dent into the face of the punch and then break two corners of the square)

8232802050_530d9198f0_b.jpg


14. fold over the head using a wooden log, a wooden or raw hide mallet to protect the face

8231738971_13cf99eff6_b.jpg


15. Curl the horns

8231738469_61145b5d5e_b.jpg

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16. Make an indentation with a round punch or a ball pien

8232800396_e33b66ae78_b.jpg


17. Cut of the hook from the parent bar

8231737351_72b48d9edc_b.jpg


18. Punch or drill a hole inside of the indentaion for the screw

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19. Taper the hook and round it of

8231736317_463c282ea6_b.jpg


20. Create a curly cue having the face facing upwards

8231735805_d7ecd156c0_b.jpg


21. Cool of the curly cue to protect it and then form the hook

8231735259_509a3ce017_b.jpg


Now you can finish it to your desire, I used a wire wheel on an angle grinder to make it shiny.

8232880844_1654c09217_b.jpg


Here is the video:




If you have questions or constructive critique feel free to express it in a comment or personal message.

Now have fun making one yourself! :)



Yours
- Daniel

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Dear Daniel,

What sort of a price would you put on one of these and how long did it take you to make it?

Curiously,
George M.

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Dear Daniel,

What sort of a price would you put on one of these and how long did it take you to make it?

Curiously,
George M.
Dear George,

it took me about two hours to make this one, but I had to videotape it... So usually I think it takes about one hour or a bit less to make one from beginning to end. I think I would charge somewhat around 25€ for such a piece, but I doubt that this would even cover all costs. If you want to buy one from me, you can send me a private message and then we could discuss the conditions.


- Daniel

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Hi Daniel, That looks great! The only suggestion I would have would be to add two holes for screws, with just one after a while it can work slightly loose and turn (depending on the wall material it is fastened to, some material works loose quicker than others) with two it should hold more securely. Also, for making coat hooks a broader end of hook is usually better for garments- a very pointy end will mishape them, I often will flatten the end out in a bit of a fishtail and curl that over so that there is a little more surface area to support the garment. Or you could fold over a section at the end and forge weld that to create a ball or wider end. This also depends on whether the hook is intended as a coat hook, or a hook for something else. This is not to pick holes in what you have done, simply suggestions of what I have found works! Keep up the good work!

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A question from a uninitiated. When you where welding the piece was throwing off many sparks. Every book I read says once the steel is sparking it is too late to weld it because it is burning. Could you please explain why it worked for you?
That is a lovely piece by the way.
Paul

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Hi Daniel, That looks great! The only suggestion I would have would be to add two holes for screws, with just one after a while it can work slightly loose and turn (depending on the wall material it is fastened to, some material works loose quicker than others) with two it should hold more securely. Also, for making coat hooks a broader end of hook is usually better for garments- a very pointy end will mishape them, I often will flatten the end out in a bit of a fishtail and curl that over so that there is a little more surface area to support the garment. Or you could fold over a section at the end and forge weld that to create a ball or wider end. This also depends on whether the hook is intended as a coat hook, or a hook for something else. This is not to pick holes in what you have done, simply suggestions of what I have found works! Keep up the good work!
Thanks for your comment, there are some good thoughts in there I will sure consider on my next hook! I know that this hook might tend to turn around but I simply found no estetically pleasing way of adding two holes...

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A question from a uninitiated. When you where welding the piece was throwing off many sparks. Every book I read says once the steel is sparking it is too late to weld it because it is burning. Could you please explain why it worked for you?
That is a lovely piece by the way.
Paul
Thanks Paul, usually when your steel sparks you burned it and you can through it away, but when forgewelding you use a flux that forms a protective coating around the steel, that keeps the oxigen away from the steel and thus allow it to be that hot without burning. If you see sparks in the fire your wait for about 5 seconds and then you take it out, it should have optimal welding temperature then. You shall not let it get so hot, that the steel turns liquid already. If you have drops coming of of the steel you made it too hot even for welding and it will kind of shatter like cast iron. The welding temperature depends on the steel and the flux you are using. Pure iron with sand as flux will have a very high temperature, high carbon steel with borax or fancy welding powders will weld at much lower temperatures.

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I enjoyed the video. I like seeing videos of this nature to see how others do things. My suggestion is that it appears to me that you work your material at to cold a temperature at times, especially when working the horns. You can develop cracks in it. I have always been told to pull out the material from the fire just before it starts sparking. Sparking means that the steel is burning up, which you don't want. Keep the videos coming and I would include some talking while your hammering. Watch a Brian Brazeal video as he talks while hammering.

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Dear Dave,

It has been my observation that it is tough to accurately judge heat by videos. The cameras adjust for exposure and depending on the camera, ambient light, etc. will not show the same color as a live eye would. Often, the video shows the metal at a hotter temperature than what it really is but I've seen the opposite too.

It appears to me that Daniel is a pretty experienced smith and I would be suspicious of the idea of him working metal at too hot or cold a temperature. Anyone who can accurately judge welding heat usually knows one end of a hammer from another.

Lightly,
George M.

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Dear Dave,

It has been my observation that it is tough to accurately judge heat by videos. The cameras adjust for exposure and depending on the camera, ambient light, etc. will not show the same color as a live eye would. Often, the video shows the metal at a hotter temperature than what it really is but I've seen the opposite too.

It appears to me that Daniel is a pretty experienced smith and I would be suspicious of the idea of him working metal at too hot or cold a temperature. Anyone who can accurately judge welding heat usually knows one end of a hammer from another.

Lightly,
George M.
Thank you for defending me George, but Dave was right with the work on the horns, there in the end it was too cold. But actually the ambient light is indeed very bright and they still must have been red. Furthermore mild steel can be worked cold to a certain degree... It is the camera as well as the ambient light that alter the visuable glowing colour so actually one can only judge it with his own eyes in a very dark shop.

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Daniel when I carve in metal making rams heads, Dragons and others I use a carving block it can be even made out of a piece of angle iron it comes in very helpful when making animal heads. nice job on the video and pictures. These are pictures of my block

post-3564-0-38669400-1354463483_thumb.jppost-3564-0-22958300-1354463512_thumb.jppost-3564-0-63385200-1354463537_thumb.jp

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Daniel when I carve in metal making rams heads, Dragons and others I use a carving block it can be even made out of a piece of angle iron it comes in very helpful when making animal heads. nice job on the video and pictures. These are pictures of my block

post-3564-0-38669400-1354463483_thumb.jppost-3564-0-22958300-1354463512_thumb.jppost-3564-0-63385200-1354463537_thumb.jp
Very cool, thanks for the suggestion!

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Dear Francis,

Could you please post a picture of you block in use? I am having a hard time visulizing how it would be used. Also, what is it made out of? I'm assuming steel but I'm not sure from the photos.

Thanks,
George M.

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