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How To Mount a Post Vice?


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Post vises come in differing heights too.  Unfortunately buying them used we don't usually have the option of just ordering the height we want.  The 6" post vise near my forge has an apron of 4"x4"s around it to make hammering on stuff a bit easier. The postvises on my workbenches are just at their "normal" height.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Thanks fellas,

I didn't think it would be too good for heavy work but I'm not doing any heavy work currently. About one inch bar stock is the largest I've worked with.  The most hammering it would have to absorb is maybe some fulluring, light twisting, and filing small pieces in the vise. The stump I have isn't very stable for twisting. I was thinking about sinking it into the ground but that makes it stationary and the landlord would rather it not be permanent but able to be packed up. 

Pnut. 

 

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I've mentioned using one of the portable fold up steel saw horses to hold a travel postvise.  I use a RR track plate under the acorn and can hammer pretty well. Bending and twisting is a bit more iffy though help from friends can get you through some good sized work.

It was widened by a previous owner who welded sq tubing on each side of the saw horse face and I had to stack a couple of 2x8 pieces to bring the face up to the correct height for the mounting bracket---held on with carriage bolts and wing nuts for easy demounting.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Once you cut something off it is difficult to put it back. 

Build a 2 inch platform at the base of the post vise to stand on.  Use it as a test platform (pun intended) to be sure 2 inches is indeed the dimension you need.  Easy to change and adjust with no damage to the post vise.  If and as your needs change, change the platform, which makes the height of the vise exactly correct for the project at hand.

The vise should always have a good, solid, and well supported base.  This will allow you to get the best from the impacts applied to the vise and what is being held by the vise.

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Bart, yes, it is a sin to cut off the leg of a post vice, one for which there may be no expiation.  The exception may be if the leg was previously cut off and has had a replacement welded on.  That is not as bad.  I strongly agree with Glenn that it is easier to build a 2'x2'x2" platform to stand on when using the vice.  Also, it does not dramatically reduce the value of the vice. 

My opinion is: DON'T DO IT!!!

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand." 

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Mobile vise and the platform can be moved together.  Just make the end of the leg rest solidly so you can get the best out of the vise.  It can be a socket on top of a plate of steel attached to the bottom of the platform.

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TheOtherBart

I have space restrictions in my backyard, I have 2 good blacksmith vices and 2 bench vices. I am going to build a bench for all 4 vices. This is the way I intend to move the vice bench around. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnZAD1odYoA&ab_channel=MatthiasWandel

If you write the keywords on youtube "retractable casters bench" there are plenty of ideas on how to move a bench or a stand around. Here in the forum there are plenty of ideas on how to move vices/anvils around. 

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Easily mobile on soft ground?  Pound the vise leg in the two inches. 

Easily mobile on a concrete floor where it's not possible to drill a hole to hold it?  I would try to source a vise that already has the acorn missing or the leg cut and adjust it to suit your needs.  Finding one already trimmed shorter should not be that difficult and if you want to get fancy do a nice lapped forge weld with real wrought iron to make a "blacksmith repair" on it which might even increase the value of the vise!

Platforms can be tripping hazards when moving *fast* to the vise with hot steel.  I do use one for one of my vises for when I need the extra height.  I also have a platform for use by a striker at my large anvil. (My anvil is set to be a good height for me with a hand hammer, a sledge and a shorter striker profits from another 4 inches or so.)

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14 hours ago, caotropheus said:

TheOtherBart

I have space restrictions in my backyard, I have 2 good blacksmith vices and 2 bench vices. I am going to build a bench for all 4 vices. This is the way I intend to move the vice bench around. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnZAD1odYoA&ab_channel=MatthiasWandel

If you write the keywords on youtube "retractable casters bench" there are plenty of ideas on how to move a bench or a stand around. Here in the forum there are plenty of ideas on how to move vices/anvils around. 

Thanks!  I'll either do something with retractable casters or build something that moves like a wheelbarrow.  That's the route I went with my anvil stand.

37 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

Easily mobile on soft ground?  Pound the vise leg in the two inches. 

Easily mobile on a concrete floor where it's not possible to drill a hole to hold it?  I would try to source a vise that already has the acorn missing or the leg cut and adjust it to suit your needs.  Finding one already trimmed shorter should not be that difficult and if you want to get fancy do a nice lapped forge weld with real wrought iron to make a "blacksmith repair" on it which might even increase the value of the vise!

Platforms can be tripping hazards when moving *fast* to the vise with hot steel.  I do use one for one of my vises for when I need the extra height.  I also have a platform for use by a striker at my large anvil. (My anvil is set to be a good height for me with a hand hammer, a sledge and a shorter striker profits from another 4 inches or so.)

I wonder if my vise hasn't already been trimmed at some point because there is no "acorn", the leg just tapers down to a flat end.  And good point about the tripping hazard.  Especially when "stowed" in the garage where I tinker on other hobbies, the chance of me tripping over a platform would be pretty high.

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Platforms are great for stationary work, sawing, filing or for kids hammering at the anvil where YOU are the one hold and moving the steel.  If I needed on in my shop full time I would definitely bevel the edge to a good slope.

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Here's what I've got so far:

IMG_20201113_182247.thumb.jpg.98506bf86dc1a2457b7d932b5a66a5d2.jpg

The vise leg goes all the way through that wood block to the floor. I built it with three legs thinking it would always sit solidly and not rock even with my somewhat uneven floor, but leaning hard on those back corners is enough to make it want to tip. That's a pretty easy fix. The height of the bench is based on where the mounting bracket was on the vise when I got it. Once I started messing with it and realized that bracket can be moved up and down I'm wondering if I'd like it better with the bench lower. It's fine for now, and if I do decide to shorten it later that won't be a huge deal.

One question since this is my first post vise...when I clamp something in it, there's a little play where the vise sits in the bracket. Hard to explain, but looking straight down on the vise the whole thing rotates back and forth a few degrees if I pull on it. Normal, or something I can tighten up?

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I don't think this is what's causing the play and mine is a tang mounted so what I would do to tighten the fit between the vise and the bracket probably wouldn't apply for yours.

However, isn't there supposed to be a pin here?

image.png.dbc6c10859a9800c3f9ea0414bbf8c08.png

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My leg vises don't have a connection between the spring and hook mobile jaw. When you say bracket I have to assume you're referring to the bracket that connects the upper end of the spring, the heel jaw and the mounting plate. If so that's easily adjusted by tightening the wedges. The wedges can get loosened when mounting the vise, just tap them in a little deeper. 

My preferred mobile mount is a round disk of steel plate with a steel post for the vise's mounting plate and a hole for the leg. Being round it can be moved easily by tipping up to the point of balance on edge ad rolling it. If storage space is the issue, then rather than welding the steel post to the plate weld a socket and pin the post. That way you can roll it around to adjust and remove the vise and lean disk and vise against a wall out of your way.

Make the disk large enough in diameter to stand on when bending or twisting and it won't move. Place the post off center and you might as well make the base square it won't be any easier to roll.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks Frosty. On closer inspection, that hole in the spring that Frazer zeroed in on does not have any corresponding hole behind it in the jaw, so no pin missing. And I'll try driving the wedges a little tighter and see what happens.

Edited by Mod30
Remove excessive quote.
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The spring will move a bit up and down along the bearing part of the jaw.  pinning it down will cause problems.  If the mounting bracket for the stationary jaw has play in it you can adjust it to fit tightly, either by forging or by shims.  (There is a postvise designed to swivel at that point but it's mounting bracket is very different than "normal ones" and the section of the shaft it clamps around is round. Rare!)

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