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Hey Guys,

have been out in the shop today and came back with these three little Items:


This ring brooch:

8060486115_1f0c53362c_b.jpg


This leaf key ring

8060488458_2ef4b55d64_b.jpg


And last but not least my first attempt on the viking mead-bottle corkscrew

8060488126_f12192bef2_b.jpg


I´d be glad to hear your opinion about that stuff.


Kind Regards
- Daniel

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I like the bottle opener and will be making a version of it.
I also like the penanular brooch.
Yea but I hope you can get the screw part on the corkscrew better than me, haven´t found out how to get that right yet. Be sure to close the brooch further than I did it here, I will have to change that also... Thanks for your comment!

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Nice work. I like the corkscrew and may try something similar. As someone who has made hundreds of penannulars and worn them I'd sugget that the opening be a bit narrower. The brooch will sit flatter against the material when worn. Also, the twist in the pin may be harder on the fabric than a straight pin. One of the concerns I hear over and over from customers is whether the pin will leave a permanent hole in the fabric.

One of the problems with making historically accurate (or, at least, in the style of) viking iron penannular broches is that there aren't many historical examples. I've only ever found illustrations of a couple and even then any surface decoration is rusted away. Cuperous alloy artifacts are probably over represented in the archeological record because the preferentially survive. And nearly all the bronze, etc. penannulars are cast rather than forged.

In making the corkscrew portion do you wrap the material around a mandrel and then pull it out to a longer screw shape? If not, could you please describe your technique?

Yours,
George

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Nice work. I like the corkscrew and may try something similar. As someone who has made hundreds of penannulars and worn them I'd sugget that the opening be a bit narrower. The brooch will sit flatter against the material when worn. Also, the twist in the pin may be harder on the fabric than a straight pin. One of the concerns I hear over and over from customers is whether the pin will leave a permanent hole in the fabric.

One of the problems with making historically accurate (or, at least, in the style of) viking iron penannular broches is that there aren't many historical examples. I've only ever found illustrations of a couple and even then any surface decoration is rusted away. Cuperous alloy artifacts are probably over represented in the archeological record because the preferentially survive. And nearly all the bronze, etc. penannulars are cast rather than forged.

In making the corkscrew portion do you wrap the material around a mandrel and then pull it out to a longer screw shape? If not, could you please describe your technique?

Yours,
George
I have to admit that I din´t knew how these broochs are used when I made the one on the picture. Now I know how they need to be in order to work best! I took a piece of 6mm round and wrapped the screw around it.

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Dear 99pppo,

At the risk of "preaching to the choir" I'll tell you what I tell my customers about penannular brooches.

They are called that because they are "almost a circle." An annulus is a circle, a donut (schmalzgebachenes) is an annulus. Pen- means "almost." "Penultimate" is almost last and a "peninsula" is almost an island. They are also sometimes called "omega" brooches because the resemble the Greek letter omega (particularly if they have curled back terminals like you did).

My explanation to customers about how to use them is that it is very simple but not immediately obvious. (1) pass the pin through the fabric. (2) Raise the tip and pass it up through the gap in the body of the brooch. (3) Turn the brooch 90 degrees to lock it. (This works better if I'm doing it while explaining it. Also, I make them do it themselves because they will remember it better if they have done it. Like in blacksmithing, muscle memory lasts longer than just mental memory.

Penannulars go back to at least the 1st century BC. They are particularly associated with the early British, Irish, Welsh, Viking, and late Roman cultures.

Historically,
George M.

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Dear 99pppo,

At the risk of "preaching to the choir" I'll tell you what I tell my customers about penannular brooches.

They are called that because they are "almost a circle." An annulus is a circle, a donut (schmalzgebachenes) is an annulus. Pen- means "almost." "Penultimate" is almost last and a "peninsula" is almost an island. They are also sometimes called "omega" brooches because the resemble the Greek letter omega (particularly if they have curled back terminals like you did).

My explanation to customers about how to use them is that it is very simple but not immediately obvious. (1) pass the pin through the fabric. (2) Raise the tip and pass it up through the gap in the body of the brooch. (3) Turn the brooch 90 degrees to lock it. (This works better if I'm doing it while explaining it. Also, I make them do it themselves because they will remember it better if they have done it. Like in blacksmithing, muscle memory lasts longer than just mental memory.

Penannulars go back to at least the 1st century BC. They are particularly associated with the early British, Irish, Welsh, Viking, and late Roman cultures.

Historically,
George M.
Thank you very much! Knowing how they are used will help me a lot to make them properly. I will re-do it with all new knowledge I gathered about them. And if I happen to make them really really good I will do a little video tutorial so other people can also understand them better. Again thank you very much for your usefull comment!

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99
Ihave made quite a few brooch's myself over the years. It will work better with the ends cosed as you said, I make my fancy ones with a leaf on one end folded back and a little scrol like yours on the other end.
As to the corkscrew i wrap it around a taper about 19mm log that is about 2mm on the small end and 6 or 7mm on the large end. Then I use my scrolling tongs to pull it out to the length I need, and turn the end to point almost straight out for a couple mm. I have been making them out of coil springs and use them as forged.

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99
Ihave made quite a few brooch's myself over the years. It will work better with the ends cosed as you said, I make my fancy ones with a leaf on one end folded back and a little scrol like yours on the other end.
As to the corkscrew i wrap it around a taper about 19mm log that is about 2mm on the small end and 6 or 7mm on the large end. Then I use my scrolling tongs to pull it out to the length I need, and turn the end to point almost straight out for a couple mm. I have been making them out of coil springs and use them as forged.
Nice ideas. I will practice a lot more to make them and then also share my experience. Due being also a viking-reenactor I will have enough chances to test them in use! Btw I sent you a contact request on MSN just that you don´t wonder...

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VERY nice work! What I see as the cork screw's problem is the point is sticking straight out rather than initiating the turn so the rest of the screw will follow. Bend it so it matches the same pitch and diameter as the rest of the screw and have the tip extend SLIGHTLY more forward on the same radius, it'll work dandy.

Frosty the Lucky.

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nice work on all of the items except.....the cork screw would be hard for me to use( left hand threads) but then again what do i know? keep up the great work!

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VERY nice work! What I see as the cork screw's problem is the point is sticking straight out rather than initiating the turn so the rest of the screw will follow. Bend it so it matches the same pitch and diameter as the rest of the screw and have the tip extend SLIGHTLY more forward on the same radius, it'll work dandy.

Frosty the Lucky.


nice work on all of the items except.....the cork screw would be hard for me to use( left hand threads) but then again what do i know? keep up the great work!
Well I have to admit that this screw isn´t yet working but I informed myself how to make really working corksrews and I will be doing a re-do soon!

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For my fine woven tunics I use a sewing bodkin to make eyelets and stitch around them like a button hole to have a dedicate penannular brooch fastening location. For my coarse wool brats they work fine as is.

Do tone down that twist though the pin should slide easily through the fabric and not "file it"

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For my fine woven tunics I use a sewing bodkin to make eyelets and stitch around them like a button hole to have a dedicate penannular brooch fastening location. For my coarse wool brats they work fine as is.

Do tone down that twist though the pin should slide easily through the fabric and not "file it"
I will go out in my shop tomorrow and will make a new one, regarding all new knowledge I gathered about broochs! Thanks for your comment!

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