Jump to content
I Forge Iron

how to make blower for forge


Recommended Posts

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=harris%20and%20heers%20blacksmithing%20pdf&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CEQQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.webpal.org%2FSAFE%2Faaarecovery%2F6_pioneer_methods%2FBasic_Blacksmithing.pdf&ei=0qcyUMbdCMu50AG9woDQAQ&usg=AFQjCNEH7j31lJg0z18t7wKkaQaXqMUmgA

Rich is right, pick an idea and run with it.

Phil

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 60
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I just assembled one that I painted canvass last night. I might be completely uncoordinated, or I made part of it the wrong size because it does not reliably fill, but blows fair when it does fill. Maybe a bag bellows is not a good option. I was only able to get it to fill every few strokes. Maybe I need another coat of paint as it is still quite limp and shows light through in a few areas.

This took me about an hour to assemble. I probably could have done the handles better, they are just poked through the canvass and tied.

pic 1
Here are the parts, a sleeve of canvass that I painted. It has hems in both ends. This is a piece of 1 1/4 inch iron water pipe I had laying around (yes galvanized so it needs stripped with acid before putting in a fire), some rope and some sticks. This bag is about 15 inches wide when laid flat, the circumference is 30 inches. Diameter is meaningless because it is a sack. It is about 40 inches long.

pic 2
install the sticks in the hem. The two sticks are less than the circumference so the top can open.

pic 3
Tie handles for your fingers and thumb to open and close the bag. This is the only valve. I just made a hole in the canvass to tie around the stick, but something neater could be done.

pic4
tie securely to the pipe.

pic 5
finished.

This was really easy to whip up, but it does not blow very well. I think it needs adjustment, or something like a hoop or a board at the bottom to hold the bottom open. In all the videos I see there are two of them being used in a small forge, usually on the ground.

The reason I was trying to make a bag bellows was to try this paint product (spray polyurethane truck bed liner) on the canvass to see if it would become a flexible material that was airtight for making a larger bellows, not because I need bag bellows. The canvass is cotton drop cloth and I sewed it on my wife's sewing machine a few says ago. I think I need another coat of paint at the very least.

Phil

post-9443-0-15925500-1345500228_thumb.jp

post-9443-0-98652700-1345500452_thumb.jp

post-9443-0-82406400-1345500518_thumb.jp

post-9443-0-23258100-1345500557_thumb.jp

post-9443-0-45538000-1345500598_thumb.jp

Link to post
Share on other sites

Azur, that pipe bellows you show is exactly what I was looking for, except that the piston HAS to have a hole in it so that when you draw the piston back it will allow air through and preventing the hot air/sparks from the forge from being drawn into the bellows.

About halfway down the page on this link, you'll see a poorly drawn example of a box bellows and how it works. You absolutely must have the air holes and leather/canvas flaps so that you are guiding the air in the right direction.

http://www.greenstone.org/greenstone3/nzdl;jsessionid=88973B8925E9B2A847CFA24BBA35AA32?a=d&d=HASHa2dbbba21520ca6c67f334.9.np&c=hdl&sib=1&dt=&ec=&et=&p.a=b&p.s=ClassifierBrowse&p.sa=

The diagram you provided would work if you modify it with a hole and flap valve in the right positions. The gasket around the piston head can be nothing more than a scrap of carpet stapled into place, and it doesn't need to be a super tight fit.

If wood-working isn't something that you're very good at, definitely consider using a section of water pipe or sewer pipe that you can cut to length.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I made a bellows out of sewer pipe similar to the one you were suggesting. here are some pictures. it is kind of hard to use but if you have an extra person to use it I think it would provide enough air. just remember to blow on the fire and step away to draw air. Here are some pics.

Link to post
Share on other sites

%7Boption%7D%7Boption%7D

#!oZZ3QQcurrentZZhttp%3A%2F%2Fs1058.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Ft408%2Fjojsmith%2F%3Faction%3Dview%26current%3DIMG_20120821_135359.jpg

#!oZZ4QQcurrentZZhttp%3A%2F%2Fs1058.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Ft408%2Fjojsmith%2F%3Faction%3Dview%26current%3DIMG_20120821_135025.jpg







If you have any questions feel free to ask.

Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way this design is rather heat sensative as it is nearly all plastic.

Yes, it is rather small. and I'm not really reccomending it. just showing you that it can work... There are MUCH better options though. It was just one of my earlier attempts at making a blower.

Link to post
Share on other sites

With a little more care that type of saw can make much neater cuts. You can also take the blade out, pass it through the holes, and cut neater openings. The openings do not need to be round, but neat is helpful. Ragged edges will make it harder for the valves to close properly.

Phil

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a rather ingenious design! I can see it with brass tacks and maybe brass nailing strips for that Steampunk look.

The holes you have cut should be as neat as possible. You want to have the edges smooth, and don't worry about making the holes too big.

The one key problem I see is that the design you showed has one long strip of rubber to cover all three of the holes. This is a recipe for disaster because the flap can get twisted and you have no way to fix it without taking the bellows apart. I would strongly suggest you use a separate flap for each hole so the rubber tubing is reasonably stiff and can't get twisted up.

Also, it will help if you hold all of your sheets of plywood together and form them at the same time as one big piece. Trying to get four individual pieces shaped and matching one another is a lot of trouble if you don't have the best equipment for the job. Holding the four or five sheets together with some clamps will help a lot.

Link to post
Share on other sites

guys can i use slim (thin) peace of wood instead sheet metal to atach iner tube on plywood


Maybe. The thin sheet metal is a lot better because it won't split out like thin wood can.

You may be able to cut up some cans to get the sheet metal. Even a bean can, cut in a spiral, can offer a long strip of metal. It would probably take several cans to get enough strip to go all the way around all 4 boards. Larger cans, like from coffee or paint, would work better.

To mark a spiral on a round can easily mark the sides of the can up one side then wrap with tape carefully in a spiral. Cur along the edge of the tape. If you don't have tape, use string then trace the string carefully.

Phil
Link to post
Share on other sites

The metal strip is there to distribute the pressure that the nails apply, and prevent the nail heads from tearing the tube material. Thin would will work, as will thin plastic, but the wood will require pre-drilling the holes so you don't split the wood. I would also recommend increasing the number of nails used, tightening their spacing, should you go with the wood option. Or, use a section of garden hose cut to length.....

Lots of options.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

A heavy knife can be carefully used to cut thin sheet metal. Carefully being a key word, getting hurt while building a tool is no good. You can use a wood mallet to drive into the sheet backed by a stump. A chisel can also be used in this manner.

If you have a vise sawing along the jaw with the hacksaw can quickly cut sheet metal neatly. Similarly using a couple clamps to fasten a piece of metal stock to act as a vise, or even a couple stout boards, could also work well as a vise and cutting guide.

Vaughn suggested pre-drilling thin wood for nails, or using some rubber hose. Rope, or a couple layers of leather strip may also work.

The idea is to provide for enough clamping along the entire edge to prevent air leaks.

Phil

Link to post
Share on other sites

Go to "internet archive. Pull up Practical Blacksmithing. It is a book from the late 1800's early 1900's. There are several very good [pieces obout how folks tinkered together blowers for forges in that era. All low tech and quite simple.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...