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I Forge Iron

Workshop Build - Start to finish pictures


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By "Finish" I mean the outside, the inside will always have new things going on I'm sure.

Started this back in may of this year, finished today, August 15. The roof and 4-5inch deep concrete slab are 15x30ft with the building being 24ft so that gives me a covered porch if i want to work outside and it creates a loft inside I can use for storage. Fully electrified with 220, small a/c unit framed into back wall that cools it off nice and will be nice to work in a cool area using the induction heater as a forge.

Now I can forge again! I hate doing siding and soffit....

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Deep spot(about 7in) for any future power hammers.
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looks slanted, its not though :)
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Done!
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The gas forge inside a building concerns me. No ventilation and no way to blow the bad air out. At least get a CO detector and use it.

Other than that one small item it looks good.

You may want to attach the roof gutters to a rain chain and a water barrel. No use wasting the water that could be collected and used for the shop or other things around the place, such as watering flowers. You were going to add foundation plantings and flowers weren't you? Maybe some veggies (grin)

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Yes I have 2 gable vents on the north side and an automatic vent with a fan mounted behind it on the south side just above where the forge is, the fan is rated for 1900sq/f. I am also going to build a heat shield for behind the forge with a fan on the ground blowing up to help vent, also the doors will be open.

I do want to do some type of rain catching especially along the back side to help with drainage, I'll let you know when the veggies are ready to pick. :)

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Awsome shop!!!!

However I cant get over the wood in the ground pole barn concept. Wood + moisture will = rot at some point in time. What if anything is done to prevent this from occuring? In SE Virginia the water table in some place is only a few feet below the surface so I dont think that concept ever stayed as a viable building option.

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Most buildings require a complete air change of at least 6 times per hour...more with "funny" gases burning. Think about how many cubic feet in the building and air circulation...also air intake restrictions...they figure into the equation.

In my part of the world we cannot afford an airconditioner large enough to combat the ambient heat PLUS the heat of the forge and work. We must have lots of available air with fans and openings. You must be lucky where you are.

Carry on

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Just to clear up the ventilation stuff, I don't plan on using the a/c unit when the forge is going, wouldn't do any good, all the doors will be open, fans going ect.. The a/c is for when I'm not using the propane, I have other things I will be doing other than smithing out there.

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Nice looking shop Daniel, congratulations. It sounds like you have the bases covered on ventilation, still you need a CO alarm, the stuff can be sneaky. How are winters in your neighborhood, got plans for heat?

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks, ya I do need to set an alarm up in there. Winters can be anything, last year was a warm one, but the year before was a blizzard and sometimes we get ice storms. Im not sure what I will do for heat yet but having the induction heater as a forge will let me keep the doors shut and use some type of shop heater.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Looks good! The only thing i would fault you on is that you did not tyvek up to the roof on the ends. (or maybe you did but it didn't make the picture). That is a common mistake, but a big no-no. I've read about this on several building pages. If water does (and it usually does) come in from the side from driving rain it can undermine your siding and bring in water and moisture that will seep in under your siding and a good bit of it will come in between the housewrap and the osb. This is probably not as likely if someone has huge overhangs on the ends of their building. However it looks like you have very little overhang on the ends the building. This would be my concern, that water will come in and you'll notice it in the way of de-lamination or staining on the osb. So I would keep your eye out for that. When you are housewrapping with a Tyveky or Typar you always go up to the top of the gables. It's that second piece of housewrap that lays over the top of the ground floor piece that acts like a shingle and stops water from getting behind the housewrap. Depending on how much of a hassle it is you might want to fix it before you see damage.

Best of luck on the new smithy.

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quick60 pole barn style buildings are all over the mid-west. you will get a faster rot by putting your post in concrete ( gives a path down the post where water can not get away) than doing the traditional of putting a concrete pad or 4 to 6 inches of rock in the bottom of the hole to set the post on, letting the water run away from the post. it looks like he was using treated 4x4 also.

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Nice. Neat. Shop. I like the outside looks of it. The little porch is cool. I'd love to reclaim a old bark made outta logs. And set back up on my place to set up my coal forges and have pea gravel in the floor. That concrete in my shop now. Sure tales a toll on me after a while nowdays. Plus I. Store my fishing boat and decoys in there top. So gotta keep stuff covered up. Its 30x48. But no matter what. I'd fill it up with stuff.
I'm picky anyway. And think I'm gonna add on To one side down the length of my shop. And move all my blacksmith out there. To stand on pea gravel and save my back. And keep all that grinding dust off my hunting and fishing stuff. While being attached So my welders and band saws can stay in the insulated shop until I need them.
Hard To have all Your hobbies under one roof. And not Cause problems between
Grinding dust has a way of getting into things you Don't want.

But you've built a nice shop there. Doesn't look like a shanty. My wife worries I will eventually build sheds all over the place around here. She don't want to look out and see that. Her daddy was that type Guy. Sheds thrown up all around their old house. She thought it looked junkie. Lol.
But I'm gonna show her yours and prove that a nice shop can Be pleasing To the eye.

Thanks for sharing. Good luck with the rest

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  • 3 weeks later...

However I cant get over the wood in the ground pole barn concept. Wood + moisture will = rot at some point in time. What if anything is done to prevent this from occuring? In SE Virginia the water table in some place is only a few feet below the surface so I dont think that concept ever stayed as a viable building option.


Down here in my area, concrete around the posts is required by code, along with rebar placed through the post to provide a positive grab for the concrete. Given that I am in an area that has been known to see a hurricane or two, wind load is a major factor in building codes, and using just gravel won't have enough grip. I have to go down about 4ft. also, for the same reason.
I went down to get the permit packet for my shop today, and had a chat with the building inspector. One of the things I brought up was this very issue. He obviously could not give me instruction in how to build, but agreed that I would run into no problems with him or the County if I coated the end and outside of the pole where it went into the ground with roofing tar. Being enclosed should limit/eliminate water infiltration from the outside of the pole above ground, and it should last a lot longer. I also am making sure that the posts are well treated for in ground placement (CCA is still allowed in my area and available). In additon to all that, I am on a high spot with a shallow grade, and it is very sandy, with the water table about 70 - 100 ft below in this area. So water won't be sitting around the poles after it rains.
For those in areas with a water table so close to the surface, you can still build a pole barn, but you are going to have to use posts with the same treatment ratings as you would use in a pier, to my knowledge.
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