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Cross pein to straight pein, good idea or waste of time?


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Ok, I used a straight pein recently and found that my striking with the pein end was much more accurate and the placement of the "divot" was where I wanted it, as opposed to with the cross pein. And, frankly, I just liked it better. Now, I happened to stumble across a few cross pein hammer heads in my in-law's barn the other day and got them for the best price going...FREE! I was wondering if it would be possible to forge the pein from cross to straight. Ok, I know its possible, but is it worth the time and effort? And thoughts would be appreciated. Also, keeping in mind that I'm new to smithing, if it's worth it, will this project be over my head or above my abbilities?

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Just try it. Any hammer time is experience time.


Good point! Maybe I will just give it a shot and see what happens!


probably easier to start from scratch and forge a whole hammer


Im sure that forging a whole hammer IS above my skill set at this point. I dont even have punches, drifts or slitters made yet!
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Why not forge the flat face and make a double peen cross/straight from one?

I've seen a fellow take a double jack hammer and make 2 45 deg peens on it using a hydraulic press----1 heat per peen!

Just take care to examine old hammer faces for cracks; you don't want to use them, though you might be able to cut off the cracked area making for a lighter but solid hammer.

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Why not forge the flat face and make a double peen cross/straight from one?

I've seen a fellow take a double jack hammer and make 2 45 deg peens on it using a hydraulic press----1 heat per peen!

Just take care to examine old hammer faces for cracks; you don't want to use them, though you might be able to cut off the cracked area making for a lighter but solid hammer.


Very good idea! Thank you Thomas!
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Being to lazy to punch holes for handles I like using old double face and ball peen hammers from garage sales, flea markets and so on to re forge into custom shapes.......One of my favorites is my 1.5lb diagonal peen. Imo cross, diagonal, and strait in varying sizes are all useful.....But then you'll need a hammer rack......... B)
Funny thing happened the other day......I got a nice 2lb dbl face and was pondering what to make on the end when I realised I didn't have a single medium dbl face hammer in the shop, got one now....... :D

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I twisted a peen on a hammer from cross to diagonal. The effort to do that was serious! If you can take a larger ball peen hammer and flatten the peen as desired you may like the result. Alternatively take a cheap drilling hammer and stock remove the peen you want on it. I stopped at "fullering" which is a really big radius on a cross peen. That was the hammer I was using at the open forge.

Phil

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Really hard to tell on here wot your abilities are,,"Cep't from wot you said, That to me may mean that you might want to take a shot at reforging one of the heads. Thomas' Suggestion that you make a douible pein hammer head really sounds like a great place to begin. y ou may be pleased to find youi can do this if youi keep at it and that after wards you may learn how to use both ends for different directions of metal movement. i like a cross and straight pein and today made a diagonal cross pein. Will see if I like it.

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Good ideas all. I have several of them, so I may try several projects to create differant sizes, angles, radius, ect..

Phill, I did'nt even notice the hammer you were using, I was too busy trying not to screw up what I was doing! I'd like to check it out if/when you make it back up!

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Good ideas all. I have several of them, so I may try several projects to create differant sizes, angles, radius, ect..

Phill, I did'nt even notice the hammer you were using, I was too busy trying not to screw up what I was doing! I'd like to check it out if/when you make it back up!


Gonna be a while before I get up there...2 hours to my parents so they can have Grandparent duty with my daughter, then an hour over there...I can't do that very often.

I started with a $7 3# Truper brand drilling hammer from Menards, wood handle, but has that stupid rubber collar on it AND it probably hides a split in the handle...buy a new handle at the same time for $5 the old one is quite short anyways. Cut the rubber off, and maybe the handle too (it is probably split and makes this easier anyways).

Dress one face to "watchglass" where the center is pretty much flat, about the size of a dime, maybe a quarter, on that hammer, and then gradually transitions around the edges. Grind the horrible drop forge flash off for cosmetics (or not). Make a template that is a circle the size of the other face (about 1 1/2 inch diameter IIRC) cut it in two half circles, apply them to the top and bottom of the hammer as a grinding guide. Grind to the line, then dress the top and bottom "watchglass" but rounded. The sides should have blended in just fine going to the template.

Tip: leave the swirls in a line in the center of the "peen" end so you know you are leaving as much metal as possible, then remove the swirls when you start to dress the head after shaping.

Drift the wood plug up and out of the hammer; save the metal wedge. You can use a piece of 1/2 inch mild round as a drift for this. File the flash inside the eye (if needed) and relieve the bottom of the eye some so as not to split the new handle. Install the new handle properly. Use caulk (Sikeflex) if you want, but I didn't and don't see the need with wedges. Now get a spokeshave, draw knife, rasp, sandpaper, whatever and adjust the handle to fit your hand. Forge some, trim some. Don't be afraid of going too far because you can re-re-handle easily.

MARK the handle at 10 inches below the head, I use a wrap of electrical tape so I can move the mark if I want. After you are SURE that the length mark is in the correct place cut the handle shorter. I had at least 3 forge sessions before making this cut.

Congratulations! You just spent an hour or more making a $7 hammer into a usable forging tool!

If you are careful about not removing too much metal, and keeping the metal cool, there will be no need to re-harden. These hammers are soft in the middle, but you have to take about 3/8 inch of material off. Yes, I have ruined a couple. The experience of taking a low quality hammer and dressing it to usable quality is well worth the time it takes.

Phil

Edit: I just checked, my hammer does not have an actual "dead flat" spot. It is very nearly flat for about the size of a US quarter, but still has a very slight crown to it.
Phil

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I didn't go hog wild on that hammer. I don't have any "before" pictures. I couldn't find the ruined hammer (not that it matters much). I took a few pictures of the 4 that I use with some regularity, the one above included.

left to right
twisted 3# cross peen, 3# cross peen, 3# drilling hammer (pictured above), 4# drilling hammer (not completely dressed out)

Pic 1 side (you can see the tape on the 4# handle marking length, and grinding flash off on the 4#)
pic 2 faces (the twisted hammer is scarred because I didn't re-harden it.)
pic 3 peens
Pic 4 cutoff handles from these and others, the top one shows how the rubber boot was on the handle. The older hammers of this brand don't have the rubber boot, and the handle isn't split.

The last 3 are just of the 3# modified drilling hammer from the previous post.
pic 5 side view of 3# drilling hammer face on anvil,
pic 6 side view of 3# drilling hammer peen on anvil
pic 7 bottom view of 3# drilling hammer peen on anvil.

in pics 5, 6, 7 there is a US quarter sitting on the anvil, but it isn't helpful because it is not in the same plane as the hammer. Sorry the pictures are fuzzy, this camera doesn't do macro.

Phil

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post-9443-0-71117800-1345155391_thumb.jp

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Being to lazy to punch holes for handles I like using old double face and ball peen hammers from garage sales, flea markets and so on to re forge into custom shapes.......One of my favorites is my 1.5lb diagonal peen. Imo cross, diagonal, and strait in varying sizes are all useful.....But then you'll need a hammer rack......... B)
Funny thing happened the other day......I got a nice 2lb dbl face and was pondering what to make on the end when I realised I didn't have a single medium dbl face hammer in the shop, got one now....... :D


That's a good one Bruce! While that exact thing hasn't happened to me I've done similar and it's been good for a laugh every time. Thanks for the smile.

Frosty The Lucky.
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