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TheoRockNazz

Two Kitchen Knives And An American Style Seax

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Hello all,



Recently I took a class with Owen Bush on forging the pattern welded seax, and I wanted to share the blade I made under his supervision, as well as two kitchen knives I made afterwards using the techniques and skills I obtained. Although Mr. Bush would say that the larger blade is not a full seax, it's certainly a mutt of seax and American subhilt fighter. Apologies for the crude pictures.




The short sword is patternwelded 1080 and 15n20 composed of three billots, the center one with a staggered twist, the outer two of random pattern. The blade is 15 inches long, 8mm thick (no distal taper), and 3.8cm wide. Handle is ~5.5" with brass fittings and purpleheart hardwood. There is a light vine pattern filworked along the base of the spine.



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The first kitchen knife is 15n20 and mild steel in a random pattern. The blade is 6.5", 6mm wide at base with progressive distal taper, and 3.3cm at the widest. The fittings are copper and brass with a purpleheart spacer, ebony handle, and inlaid canary design in twisted copper and German silver wire (the logo of the studio that commissioned the knife).



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The second kitchen knife is also 15n20 and mild steel in a random pattern, but with fewer layers. The blade is 5.75", 6mm wide at base with progressive distal taper, and 3.4cm at the widest. Copper and brass fittings, antler spacer, and zebrawood handle. There is a vine pattern fileworked along the entire length of the spine.



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All three blades went through the same heat treating process - normalization, hardening in oil, dark straw tempering. All handle work was done by hand tool (except for drilling), and the wood finished with multiple applications of linseed oil.



I've been trying to develop my own style; leaving a bit of the blade rough (just the kitchen knives), filework (excluding the one kitchen knife - they requested so), and the shape of the handle.



I would greatly appreciate any input!



Theo Rock Nazz



TheoRockNazz.com

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I would suggest smoothing the edges of the brass work on your fighter so it won't be as hard on the person holding it.

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A sub-seax... that's a cool idea.

You are fortunate to have trained with Mr. Bush.

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id say try to get the seax a little straighter in the handle. but other size really good work man!

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