LDW

Jims Arrival to Brians from Connecticut

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Brian got the new striking anvil anchored in place today so we made a new Round swage tool (cupping tool) for it. We then seated some of the other tools. The first few pics were of this. Shortly after that Jim arrived and they started making tools. I got a few pics but had to run off. After Brian and Jim made a hot cut, Brian then made the most used small fuller then Jim got started on a large fuller. This is going to be good because Jim seems quite capable of handling the hammers.

https://picasaweb.google.com/LDWynn/JimsArrivalToBrians?authuser=0&feat=directlink



Brian and Jim forging a hot cut hardy from 1 1/4" round 4140.
IMG_6726.JPG

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real nice set of pics..We all enjoy these pics you post, thanks guys..

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Brian Brazeal. He (apparently) currently has a student from CT. Brian is in Mississippi and is the best techniques teacher for moving metal, quickly and efficiently, with little energy use. I took a week long class from him and came home with tons of tools and more knowledge of smithing and moving metal than I've gotten anywhere else in the last six years combined. Excellent guy, excellent teacher!

Great cover picture Lyle!

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I thank you so much for all the photos and comentary you provide. This just makes me want to come down and take classes even more!!!
Brian, one of these days you will be hearing from this cincinnati suburban blacksmith. HAHA!! Hopefully sooner and not later. Good work, keep it up!!!!

P.S. Can i make a request for more videos? Its got to be more work on your part, but i'm sure we all will enjoy.

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Love the pics! I'm trying to finalize a week with Brian in Oct right now.
As a total newb, I think it would be great to start off doing things the best way rather than getting into some bad habits that need correcting later on.....

Very much looking forward to that. ;-)

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I was thinking Brian lived in Ct., (I was born and raised in Norwalk, Ct. before ending up in Upstate NY) and i was getting excited at the chance to meet him.
Mississippi's a bit too far for now though. :(

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Not the most fun ride in the world and would probably be over twice the time it took me, but taking a Greyhound bus is rather inexpensive. Those considering taking a class should consider that option as transportation to help keep cost down!

"Black Frog" EXTREMELY wise choice! I've been smithing for six years and have taken over 9 weeks of classes at John C Campbell folk school. (And that's a GREAT school and I've learned under some of the BEST they have!) However, after taking Brian's class, my forging ability and production doubled, my enjoyment of forging doubled, and it's helped with things as simple as heating the metal more efficiently than before.



PS: Sorry Brian but I still haven't picked up on the not dropping the tools on the floor thing. I've got two tool trays, and I still drop my tools on the floor, and then grab another off the tray! I try, but it hasn't stuck yet! :D

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Thanks for the pics LDW! I too hope to get a chance to take some classes with Brian. Every time I see these posts I get jealous, but I hope to have some time next year to take part in Brian's lessons.

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Looks like Brian is using the new anvil that we built last week.....and Brian did not like the blue color I had painted it...

but all is well...the new striking anvil is shorter so striking is a bit more comfy....FYI it is 24 in tall from the floor

Good looking cover pic too, Lyle

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I've always appreciated all the great pictures posted from class time. Each one is worth a thousand words to me, and I like words!

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Good to see some pictures of the bottom fullers being made. Those half round set hammers used to form the radius on the fullers would be nice to have... a real challenge to make one, I assume.

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David, Maybe you can tell me when you drilled the 7/8'' hole for the hardy that Brian drifted to 1" square how far in from the edge did you come? I plan on making one mine is 2 3/4" thick and 5 1/4" wide the piece is 18" long but I am thinking of cutting it to about 12". Any thoughts would be welcomed.

Gaylan

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I cannot advise you on the length of the top. There could be many differing options that perhaps Brian or Lyle could add.

Initially the 1 inch hole was changed to 3/4 diameter. The reason for this is that the 1 inch square drift would leave an ever-so-slight semi-circle on the shoulder. It may seem impossible but it really happens. brian thought that going to a 3/4 inch hole would leave plenty of material so that there would be ONLY a square hole after drifting. When I took the metal back to Brian he determined that perhaps a little larger hole may be necessary. Staying less than 1 inch and we could have drilled anything we wanted, Brian chose 7/8 inch. The drift left a nice shape hole. When it fully cooled it had to be re-drifted...and the hole was square.

Mechanical design techniques generally like a hole to be 3 hole diameters from edges. If I had the choice I would try to at least that 3 diameter separation, that is 3 inches from any shoulder, so the center would be 3 1/2 inches from the edge.

Brian chose the 1/2 in pritchel to be 2 inches on-center from the hardy hole. He has constructed a rotating drift hole plate that can be pinned into the hardy so that his students learn to drift into a correctly supported shoulder material while the drift continues into the full sized hardy hole.

One thing to consider here though is the leg placement for support. We used 2 inch square tubing with very heavy sidewall...like 5/16...but at least 1/4 inch. The floor plates are 1/2 thick too. Brian fills those with sand and oil! If you put your legs in the wrong position they could be interrupting the pritchel or the hardy hole. His legs are 45 degrees from axis and 8 degrees off vertical. There is also a 3/4 alloy plate supporting the 3 inch thick anvil! Preheating the plate prior to welding was used. the pritchel and hardy holes were enlarged on the support plate. When finished and prior to adding sand and oil, the anvil weighed 110 pounds. The striking surface being 3 inches thick is still A36 material. Remember that it is for students stiking with a very heavy hammer...many for the first time in their life. The improved striking heighth is taking into consideration of the heigth of the tools used...swages...fullers....drifts...punches. There are going to be many misses too. Imagine a big hammer coming back at you at high speed if the anvil was hardened steel. A36 makes a good choice and will get many dings from mistakes. I put a few dings in the other striking anvil myself so I think Brian made a good choice in anvil steel.

Think about how many student Brian and Lyle have had on the striking anvil thus far. Would it be necessary to have an anvil much larger or out of super alloy? One of his reasons for a new striking anvil is to support and even larger hand hammer while being hand forged. The new wider anvil will be able to fit a 5 pounder..I think. My 3 1/2 pounder is large enough for me most times.

Maybe we can get some comparative pics of the two stiking anvils side by side to compare.

From now on the students will be in a little better striking height.

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Thanks David,
All this information is very helpful. I will be gathering all the material for the stand, so when I get back from ABANA Conference I can get started on this project.
Have a great day!!!
Gaylan

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Apparently these guys are good at this type of stuff :)

I have heard of them before....

Seriously Brian and Lyle are about the most straight up and good people around, Karen is pretty amazing too thanks to all of you for having me down there.

One day I will repay your kindness, If not directly to you to someone else who needs it.

Still trying to get the knowledge into technology, like you said it will work more effectively unfortunately to make that happen it takes alot more than working in the shop, right now I am injured so I am working to make it happen

Hopefully your all doing well down south, hopefully people are getting the chance to use the knowledge the way it should be used.

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