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Michael, I was looking at your pictures on page 5 of your Niles anvil before the concrete pour. It looks like the top of the wide flange on the anvil is level or a few inches below your floor. I'm guessing the height of your bottom die is about 35" to 36" from the floor. If that's correct, doesn't feel a bit high for that size hammer to you? I have my Nazel 2B at 35" but it's less than a quarter of the Niles in size. I am thinking of shooting for 32" to 33" on the Niles, the same as my anvil.

I am also considering pulling the Nazel and mounting it on a steel plate as many have. I like that setup and this would let me set the Niles on the existing Nazel foundation. It can handle it as the Nazel foundation now is 8 ft. By 9 ft, and 7 ft. Deep.

 

The top of the die is at 35" but the bottom of the anvil was around 8" below the top of the floor, I don't think its to high Grant's Bell looks even higher. I would rather have some cushion under the anvil than directly on the concrete maybe that Fabreeka stuff, you could always build a platform around the hammer if its too high.

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Just went over my notes, the bottom of anvil is 12" below concrete floor and the frame is on 8-1/2" of wood. Add a cushion and you'll be over 20" of wood under the frame, may get a bit sketchy?

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Thanks for the info. I just remembered that you had to fab your sow block so the dimensions will be different as far as the set below the floor. But thanks for the 35" measurement. I can easily figure out the height as the die and sow block are sitting in the anvil now. I was just wondering what your working height is.

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Hope you all had a great 4th!
It has taken a ton of degreasing, scrubbing, needle scaling and wire brushing, but here she is, with the first coat of paint. A dark blue, all the linkage and treadle will be a bright orange red color.

Michael, the sow block measures, 20" square, and is 12-1/2" tall, minus the two dovetails. I calculate the weight of the sow block to be about 1200 lbs.

I can't wait to dig :) I decided on a new foundation

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Thanks Matt, it will certainly look good beside the Nazel, I'm glad you are going ahead with a new foundation. Did you get the large key that holds the anvil into the frame?

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I'm not sure if I got that key or not. I've got a tool box of miscellaneous parts, probably in there, my buddy saved everything.
I cleaned the oiler out and degreased and cleaned it. Then put a new coat of paint on it today.
Here it is cleaned up. Need a new sight glass for the top, the old one is cracked out, might use some clear poly pipe and make a top for it.
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Hey Phil, those calculations are good info for sure. Way back on page 6 shows the 200 in the different modes of operation, running off my big compressor. 

 

Do you have any vids of the GB steam/air hammers in action?

 

Thanks, 

Michael

If you have a look in the press section at AoCs post on the 1500 ton press at Eveligh it shows some footage of steam hammers there in his little video that he has posted.

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Now that we're back I'm hoping to see some very cool advances by the usual suspects. It has been so hot and humid in the mid-Atlantic it is very hard work to be in the shop. I've sent a 150 off to Austin Texas and a 100 of to Ashville North Carolina. I'm working on a 150. All these with my standard valve system.

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Forged some 10" today, well more like just a texture. With a good heat I think it would be possible to bring it all the way down   :blink: I have a few more I can practice on...

 

 

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Danger you need shingling tongs to forge discs like that under the hammer, using hollow bits is really hard way to grip it.

Heres a picky of me using shingleing tongs to roll a disc under the press, I let the tongs rest on the side of the plate we have around the press and use that to lever off to turn the disc, if using the hammer we go along the die ie, at 90 degrees to the way you are working, I'll see if I can find some footage of us rolling a disc or ring under the hammer with shingling tongs.

Phil

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Thanks Phil, I have found shingling tongs to be my choice more often the more I forge under these hammers. The range of width, the amount of grip and leverage is extremely beneficial. I havn't heard the term shingling before, is that a process of rolling the material?

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Shingling was when they made wrought iron, and they brought the lump of iron out of the puddling furnace and shingled it under a shingling hammer, basically they needed tongs that only gripped the side of the job and could grab it and turn it and let it go easily and quickly, answer shingling tongs.  We have a couple of rings to forge tomorrow that we have to roll back in to size after they get rung out under the hammer (its all about getting square corners, which are hard to get with the press).  I'll make sure I get vid of it, and post it, with attention to when we roll the rings back to size.
 
Phil

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Ran out of time today, our machinist decided that today was the day to machine hammer dies, so he has got the fit down to less that 3 thou all round, XXXX machinists and their acuracy fetish.  tommorrow will be the day.  Sorry to keep you waiting woody, have another XXXX.

Phil

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoBy9_hgrNg

 

Video of us ring forging, we have already jumped the blank up under the press and punched to hole out to the mandrel size.  You can see how I use the shingling tongs to roll the ring under the hammer, by levering off the bottom block.

 

Phil

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And thanks to the late Great Mr Grant Sarver (and one of his utube posts)I have learnt how to embed video off Youtube into IFI, see he's still teaching us from beyond the grave.

 

Phil

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That was great to watch.

 what is the product you are sizing steel for.

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Hey Basher they are a kind of ring gear as far as I know, 4140 we heat treat them to 277 to 311 HB.  Made a fair few of them now, (100s) we start off with 234mm of 140 dia and end up with 270mm OD x 120mm id x 75mm thick.  We have one of the finish machined rings that did not clean up in the shop that we use like a final go and no go guage.

 

Phil

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Great work Phil - I never cease to be amazed what can be knocked out under a simple, smallish hammer, with flat dies in it and a bit of tooling and a lot of experience!

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