Jump to content
I Forge Iron

What type of welder are you guys using?


Recommended Posts

. With flux core I have to work just to get welds that doen't require more time grinding than it's worth.

Do you switch the polarity when using flux core wire? Innershield wire is electrode -, mig wire is electrode +
You will not get good results if you are not running the right polarity for the electrode in use
Link to post
Share on other sites

I figured I'd throw this in since it was mentioned that the little lincoln migs were made in the USA. Not true, the migs sold by the big box stores (lowes, home depot and so on) are made in mexico. I found that out the hard way when I sold a guy a replacement gun without checking and it didn't fit. Turns out if your mig has a serial # that starts with M it's a mexican machine. Hobart was bought out by Miller and is now their "red headed step child", but as far as I know they are still made in the good ol' usa. When my mig finally goes I will replace it with the miller 211.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I figured I'd throw this in since it was mentioned that the little lincoln migs were made in the USA. Not true, the migs sold by the big box stores (lowes, home depot and so on) are made in mexico. I found that out the hard way when I sold a guy a replacement gun without checking and it didn't fit. Turns out if your mig has a serial # that starts with M it's a mexican machine. Hobart was bought out by Miller and is now their "red headed step child", but as far as I know they are still made in the good ol' usa. When my mig finally goes I will replace it with the miller 211.


Good to know. I was aware that the machines sold at big box stores were not the same as those sold by welding suppliers, but I was not aware they were made in Mexico. Then again, it is no surprise they have several plants...

Phil
Link to post
Share on other sites

I advise taking a welding course for both safety as well as to learn about what machines can and can't do, ie their limits. That said, I made the mistake of buying a welder before taking a course and found out that the cheap tombstone with the click into a limited number of settings did not have the adjustability to make decent welds as the limited settings would result in either not enough penetration or too much penetration. I always advise learning what you can about new tools and trying them before spending money on something that you will have to replace.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend of mine bought a Lincoln mig welder, took it home and fired it up and heard a loud noise from inside the machine. The fan had come loose, when he looked inside the was a tag that said "Assembled in Mexico." That was over 20 years ago.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I started out with a Lincoln 135 then sold it and moved up to a Miller 210 for the increased power and duty cycle. It's all the machine I need. I also picked up a small stick machine at a discount store but I'm not very good with it since it doesn't get much use. I am doing more forge welding lately.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lincoln SP100 110V MIG
Lincoln 250? MIG - it's at a friend's house currently
MillerMatic 200 MIG
Miller MP-65E MIG (650A 3 phase)also does stick.
MIller 250,or 300 TIG at the same friend's house.
Linde UCC-305 (350A)Awesome welder!1,000# of smoothness.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Miller 444 cv for stick welding , fluxcore, and gouging, I use it for T.I.G. on steel , Miller 250 synchrowave , with hi freq. and foot pedal for T.I.G. welding aluminum and stainless steel . Miller 250 M.I.G. and aluminum spool gun. On many of the scroll work door panels I make, I will tack with the M. I. G. , and weld out with T.I.G. With the 400 amp machine there is an almost explosive touch start going in,with deep penetration , and fusion with only a touch of E-70s2 filler wire. Less smoke as mentioned before and a lot less clean up grinding , For a professional shop , Miller equipment can't be beat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you switch the polarity when using flux core wire? Innershield wire is electrode -, mig wire is electrode +
You will not get good results if you are not running the right polarity for the electrode in use


Yes, I switch polarity but find the gas shielding is much easier. I did a little welding today and actually got some nice beads with the flux core. I think maybe practice but most likely a welding course would help. Sorry for the sidetrack and the delay.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had my Lincoln 225 tombstone for years, and I started with it. For some interior installations, I got a 110V Lincoln MIG. I've been using oxy-acetelyne for years, and even though it is slower than electric and considered archaic by some, I really enjoy it. It's so much fun pushing that puddle around.
Most of my welding is forge welding.

Years ago, the talented smith, Tom Bredlow, had a shop visitor who 'sniffed' around his shop for a little while. The guy then pipes up and says, "Ha! I thought you were a blacksmith. What's that arc welder doing in the corner?" Tom responded, "I am a blacksmith; I'm just not a stupid blacksmith."

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had my Lincoln 225 tombstone for years, and I started with it. For some interior installations, I got a 110V Lincoln MIG. I've been using oxy-acetelyne for years, and even though it is slower than electric and considered archaic by some, I really enjoy it. It's so much fun pushing that puddle around.
Most of my welding is forge welding.

Years ago, the talented smith, Tom Bredlow, had a shop visitor who 'sniffed' around his shop for a little while. The guy then pipes up and says, "Ha! I thought you were a blacksmith. What's that arc welder doing in the corner?" Tom responded, "I am a blacksmith; I'm just not a stupid blacksmith."


:D :D :D :D I like this!
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with Frank on this one tombstone stick. Like the one I have will do alot. You just have to have right electrodes. Small diameter for light material. Migs are nice to have, but they require more comsumables. (tips, gun liners, gas, etc.)



Larry

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would go with MIG!!!!
I have a Millermatic 212 Auto set, and it is GREAT, I have taught several people who have never touched a welder, and within 5 minutes their welds look like a row of dime's!!!!!
Also if you go with MIG, I would suggest getting a 90/10 (90% Argon, 10% OXY) shielding gas, with it you will get better penetration, and cleaner welds.
I also have a Lincoln buzz box, but I never use it, always use MIG.

Just my 2 cents worth

Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a thermal arc 161 stick/TIG welder last year and it is outstanding. Goes 110v or 220v and includes a simple TIG set-up. I paid a little over $400 off of ebay. After using it a while I sold my
300 amp welder, just didn't really need that big of a machine. Go to the thermal arc (thermal dynamics) website. They also have a small suitcase welder that will do MIG-TIG and stick all in one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lincoln Idealarc 250 AC/DC Sweet welder, just wish my power supply was heavy enough to the shop to run it.( yea didn't think that out to well)
Lincoln Bobcat 225G AC/DC gas powered W/60 foot leads. Portable, fully adjustable power range, my go to welder for heavy stuff and outside welding.
Millermatic 35 Mig. Old one but still welds great, sadly I'm told major parts are no longer available for it...... great for thin stuff though.
Campbell Housefeild flux core welder, works ok and got me by for a few years and was cheap enough but I don't get it out much unless I have a small project that has to be welded outside in the wind.
Oh and a GOOD self darkening helmet, best money I ever spent.
Whatever you get, one will probably never be enough.lol :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

The option of ac/dc on the stick welder will give you freedoms you didn't know you had without the dc. Yes, the straight ac welder will do a lot of work. As you progress you may find that using dc will be all you do (yes 6011 is indeed handy but I seldom use it). Everyone has needs that will vary.

I have a Miller 172 mig, an old Wards stick ( ac/dc) and an older Allmond Bros stick bought new in 1946 ( my great uncles welder and the first welder I ever used). I do the large bulk of shop welding with the torch but the mig does indeed get used a lot.

When buying old welders, please be sure and check the connections and the insulation on the rod holder (meaning of course stick). Make sure the welder and the service are grounded properly. This will not only be a safety issue, it may make a pulse welder act extremely weird.

What Frank Said on the quote !

Link to post
Share on other sites

I started with a small 130 mig. It died so I bought the sip 250amp mig. good for tube and ally and light solid, now I use mostly ac stick up the shed, and dc stick as it is the option with the dc tig, and can do the stick ally. Light tig dc is very handy for light tack ons, and repairs and is the electric oxy with gas
The reason I like stick is its the best to forge if you need to. And tig if you can't. It's a cheap Chinese inverter welder tig stig to 200 amps, and has served me well for about 9 years.
Get the best welder you can afford. I find diversity is the key for work, if your welder can do it, you will learn it, and it can make you money, or serve you.
Any of the big name welders like a power source, that can do the ac dc and hf start, and you can buy the attatchments like mig feeder, or tig gun, and stick cables, .....will give you all the welding capability possible.
I also have oxy/LPG and acetilyne, another very powerfully tool for cutting and welding. With the addition of the henrob thingy, an all round welder and cutting platform, that may serve you quite well.
Best way to decide is to go to a workshop and see what processes are needed and how they fulfill it.

Hope this hasn't added confusion

Link to post
Share on other sites

hello all i read through this post with interest and wondered what welding tool i would have if i were only allowed one , that would be oxy/accetlyne for all round adaptability you can solder soft/hard braze bronze weld light the fire quick weld cast iron pre heat stuff cut gouge all manner of material , second would be a big welding transformer i could add a rectifier, high frequency generator , remote wire feed those are the base welding tools and of course the fire . in the uk the insurance people freak out at accetlyne but you might have better over there . whatever you chose or are able to get it will be fine you have just got to put the hours in to develop the skills. and keep the rods dry dry dry !!! good luck .

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...