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This past weekend at the Saltfork annual picnic i seen this sitting in the bed of a truck for sale.. seen the price tag on it said 295 and kept walkin (im out for a broken collarbone and getting paid 60% from the insurance from work so not alot of extra cash to go around after bills here lately).. while i sat inside watching some forging my wife went walking around checking things out.. A little while goes by and she comes and gets me, brings me outside and said this was comin home with us, she got it for 250 and he would take payments SWEEEEEEEEET .. No slop in it what so ever, no leaks and it puts out more air than my wifes hair dryer i had hooked up to the forge..

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Your wife purchased a Canedy Otto Tiger blower?

Mine purchased some craft paper and colored markers, how about that!?

I'd like one. The only model I have found was a worn out Western Chief. I know enough about them that if it is worn out, I'd have to make parts for it. Someday, perhaps.

What is Saltfork? Hee in Ohio it is a State Park.

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I hope you appreciate what a gem you got for a wife Gator! Great score, did you know what a deal you were getting when you proposed?

Saltfork Craftsmen is a smithing group.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I had one on my portable rig - great blower and works well with typically sized firepots; I had mine on a Centaur round pot.

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thanks guys. I can definetly say she is something else. She does more for me in a day than i can do for her in a year. Shes been showing quite a bit of interest in smithing too.... now on this blower. all the canedy otto's ive seen have the numbers,like Nghtmrknife's C997 and the 990 on the base.. why doesnt mine have this? and that add is pretty cool, 20 bucks MAN i got robbed lol.. done a little searchin and came across a 1920 sears roebuck add......... the forge that its going to be hooked to is about 20"x22" dont remember what the size of the firepot was though.. anyway thanks again guys
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i know the forge is ugly as sin but hey, i built it and im proud of that..

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Great deal. A mint condition, as-new blower is hard to find and I'm sure she'll provide you with years of great service.

Love that home-made forge, too. If I can find a coal supplier in the area, I'd like to go that route, too. There's nothing like the smell of coal burning...

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is your forge mounted on a 3 wheeler or a lawn mower? puts new meaning to portible forge lol..

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i was in the process of building it and didnt have any legs on it, so it was sittin on my 3 wheeler... not a bad idea though

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Gator your wife drives a hard bargan. She told me she can't even blow-dry her hair cause you have her hair dryer out in the shop all the time. After she jewed me down a bunch she said she did not have the money and talked me into payments ! What a woman!
I got the blower from a 96 year old man in southern Oklahoma who told me his father bought it new from Sears-Robuck in the early 1920s along with a 125lb. ACME anvil that according to the serial # was made in 1913. He said they used the blower on a hand made forge. Said they used it to sharpen plow points and cultavator shoes. Said it was used maybe a dozen times in the past 80+ years as they were not Blacksmiths. I was amazed as to how tight and in" better than new" condition it was in. I would say it is good for another 100 years or so. Glad to see it will be used, and not placed in some musieum.

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Gator your wife drives a hard bargan. She told me she can't even blow-dry her hair cause you have her hair dryer out in the shop all the time. After she jewed me down a bunch she said she did not have the money and talked me into payments ! What a woman!
I got the blower from a 96 year old man in southern Oklahoma who told me his father bought it new from Sears-Robuck in the early 1920s along with a 125lb. ACME anvil that according to the serial # was made in 1913. He said they used the blower on a hand made forge. Said they used it to sharpen plow points and cultavator shoes. Said it was used maybe a dozen times in the past 80+ years as they were not Blacksmiths. I was amazed as to how tight and in" better than new" condition it was in. I would say it is good for another 100 years or so. Glad to see it will be used, and not placed in some musieum.


Wow, that's pretty much the exact same story I got from a guy in New Braunfels (except it was his grandpa who originally bought the tools). I was able to buy the blower, a forge and vise but he would not part with the anvil. I reckon Sears must have sold a "kit" and in some cases, the various pieces stayed together over the years.

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I was able to get the anvil also but it was not in as pristine condition as the Tiger blower. Since they were farmer/ranchers and not blacksmiths, they abused the edges of the anvil face. Altho the "ACME" stamped on the body is as ledgeable and easy to read as if new.

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Gerald having that story makes owning it a million times better. Wish I Coulda got the anvil too just to be able to keep em together but she said I already had one. I really appreciate you working with us on that too. I have a friend that is looking for a blower. And I haven't had a chance to ask any of the saltfork guys yet. So if you might know where anymore are holler at me

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I finally got the blower hooked up. To maintain heat 1crank over about 4seconds is all it takes a little faster to warm it up a bit. That thing is awesome

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I just finished the first stage of cleaning on a blower I picked up along with a Fulton anvil from a fellow about a mile from my house.  Turns out, my blower is identical to Ngtmrknife's.  I don't have the base, unfortunately.  Also, the mounting section of the housing had been cracked and repaired with a brazing rod...looks like it was done a WHILE back.  It was caked with coal dust and completely locked up.  I got into it and freed up the gears, hosed everything down with WD40 and let it soak overnight.  I've still got some scrubbing to do on the outside of the housing.  Man, I wish I had that base!!  Anyhow, I gave $150 for both the 100# anvil and the blower.  It sure puts out some air!  I informed my 12 year old daughter that her indentured servitude began as soon as that crank turned.

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Slightly off topic. I have the blower and the base, but the blower occasionally locks up, so I'm not using it right now. I also have the regular Cannedy Otto blower hooked to my forge. There is a slightly different gear arrangement between the two. The outward appearance is about the same. The bases (stands) are different.

 

Saltfork is a river in Kansas and northern Oklahoma which joins the Arkansas River. When the regional blacksmith organization got started in Oklahoma in 1995, most of the guys were from northern Oklahoma, and they named themselves the Saltfork Craftsmen. The group has expanded to cover Oklahoma and the surrounding states, but it retains the name. Mike George of Alva, was one of the driving forces behind the Saltfork formation. He was the first Secretary/Treasurer and remained at that office for a number of years. Mike used to come to my town, Santa Fe, annually to visit the downtown Spanish Market. One year, he showed up at my forge unbidden, but welcomed. We had a nice visit. The following year, he showed again and invited me to be the first demonstrator for the Saltfork Craftsmen. I acquiesced, and in 1997, we had our demo/meeting in Guthrie, Oklahoma. Later, I was contacted by Mike to demo again for them, that being in 2003, same venue.

 

The meetings in Guthrie were held at a wonderful museum, the Southwest Iron Works, owned privately by David King. See http://www.anvilmag.com/smith/112f1.htm

 

Mike introduced me to "coal hammers." He has a collection of small cast iron-headed hammers, each with a store or coal dealer advertisement cast in. Apparently, these were giveaways in the Midwest, much as yardsticks used to be given by hardware stores. They were used to break up overly large chunks of coal in the days when many homes were coal-furnace and coal-stove heated. I ran across one by accident at an antique mall and sent it to Mike.

 

I might mention that if you tune into the Saltfork Craftsmen, you will see that as a fund raiser, they are selling cast cone-mandrels and cast swage blocks at a reasonable price.

 

Sayings and Cornpone

Branch Rickey, describing Jackie Robinson:

"He had guts enough not to fight back."

     "Bits and Pieces" January, 1983

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