Gundog48

Making Hardy Tools

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I've just bought myself a proper anvil so I would be able to use hardy tools as I work alone. I found a very good video demonstrating how to make a cut-off hardy whereby you start off with some square stock, thin the end end hammer it into the hardy hole. Then you upset the metal using a sledgehammer with the shaft part in the hardy hole. The only problem is, he was using a massive 500lb anvil, while mine is only 1cwt, I'm rather worried that it wouldn't be able to cope with that much stress.

What do you think? If my anvil isn't up to the job, what would you recommend? I've got a solid block of steel which would be ideal, but I have no idea how I would make a hardy sized hole through 2 inches of steel!

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Make a bolster plate! You pre-drill a hole then clean it out to proper size using a diamond point cold chisel and other cold chisels.

The end of the Mark Aspery video shows making one. It is easy, about an hour of effort and you got one. Instead of making the can as shown in the video you can use 1/2 inch or heavier (I used 1 inch mild) and fasten it over a hole in a log. I also drilled four 1/2 inch holes because I don't have a 1 inch bit.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxTdbC5MLRQ&feature=plcp&context=C453016eVDvjVQa1PpcFOo_aFHC1nmldXtittsVMElUn-5mjOOaHk%3D

Phil

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Making a bolster plate isn't all that hard even in 2" there is a Mark Aspery vid showing how. Makes it look super simple. Mostly it's all in the layout and drilling of the holes. Then the right chisel to dress it out. Only thing that might make it harder is if the piece of plate is hardened.

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As I mentioned I used 1x3 inch a36 steel. I ordered a 12 inch piece from Speedymetals.com specifically to make it. A drill press is helpful, but I am sure it is not necessary. I have a Trenton 168# anvil and I am sure upsetting in it won't hurt it, but I ordered the plate when I was using a cast iron ASO that I chiseled a new hardy into (my first experience making a square hole!) and I did not want to break the heel off again.

http://www.speedymetals.com/pc-4165-8214-1-x-3-a-36-1020-hot-rolled-steel.aspx

Phil

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Another way if you have some type of arc welded is to weld a piece if bar stock that fits tightly in the hardy hole from corner to corner this slows you to weld on both sides of the bar and you don't have to grind off the weld to fit the h. That is the way I make smithing magician tools fit my anvil it fitslsoole.

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I never thought of drilling it! I'll get some thinner stuff and get to work, although I don't have a drill bit big enough nor a drill to accommodate it. Perhaps I could get a big enough drill bit, heat up the steel and hot drill it? This method looks good, I'm looking forward to some care-free sledgehammer bashing! Special thanks to Phil, I think you've answered every question I have posted on here!

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Can you forge weld? You can make a hardie hole tool like this drawing. Upset the center bar first as you'll lose some material from heating.

post-1310-0-76661600-1335197575_thumb.jp

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use a small drill to drill a series of small holes around the edge and use 1/4 chisel to cut the web away also drilling a hole in the center helps to let the chisel move the metal out of the way ...a small chisel works a lot faster than a larger one

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. Perhaps I could get a big enough drill bit, heat up the steel and hot drill it?


Hope you get some pictures of 'hot drilling'. I have done some hot drilling but never on purpose. :D

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I set to work today, the steel I'm working on is surprisingly soft and was pretty easy to drill through. Only had a few hours after school but I drilled out quite an area. I'm getting way ahead of myself as I haven't got a working blower yet, so I haven't actually done any forging! In the mean time I've been hitting the books and getting everything ready for the projects I want to do. Should have the blower finished by the weekend and I'll be scrounging at a few garages for some scrap suspension coil springs so I can start making punches, chisels and the like.

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Check out Brian Brazeal striking anvil it is a good option. I have an old Alsop and the hardie is 5/8" which is small and I wanted tools to take with me that would fit in a 1" hardie hole. that is a more universal size why put all the stress on the heel of a small anvil. there are many options for making the hole I drilled and then filed it square. http://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/24163-brian-brazeal-striking-anvil/

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Trying to drill it was a disaster, I'm thinking of making a drift out of 30mm square stock, what do you think?

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If you have a hole, you can drift it. If you don't have a hole, you need a hole first. You can drill or punch.

Phil

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