Glenn

Show me your Forge

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i like that brick forge you made irnsrgn i want to make one like that but i want to put a suspending hood on the one i want to build so i can do 360degs aroung it if i need but thats on the wish list when i get my own little outhouse to work in :)

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Sorry I did not get these in yesterday - had to adjust sizing. For the Champion I believe I can just lay a plate in the bottom and connect the tuyere to it and the cast iron forge may be able to be welded back together.

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Sisu, with a hood you will always have smoke in your shop, especially with that small flu pipe, A larger flue pipe and making it into a side draft is really simple and will insure you a smoke free shop if the top of the flue is at least 4 feet above the peak of your building. Nice setup otherwise.

This is the side draft forge I built for the Brown County Ag Museum Blacksmith shop. The smiths who have used it call it the "Super Sucker", its based on Uri Hofi's school forge flues.

museum forge construction :: Ag Museum Forge Construction slideshow by irnsrgn - Photobucket



Thank you for the info Irnsrgn! I was considering a side draft forge as an improvement to my current setup. However, I don't have access to electricity in this building (it is an old sugar shack in the woods). Would I require the use of forced air to get it to work or can it naturally draft on its own?

I was thinking of using the existing 6" black pipe and connecting it to some 8" black pipe to get a 14" diameter stove pipe. I could place the bottom of the pipe close to the firepot and have an opening cut in the stove pipe end for the smoke. Do you think that work?

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I tore apart the old sheetrock and metal stud hood I had built, it served well for 2 years, now I have mounted the new metal side draft hood, and await my buddies call that he has made the adaptor, to fit the 10 inch pipe to the 13 inch culvert pipe that goes through the roof. We have this style of forgehood on the 5 forges we use in my pole barn for hammer ins, and this style is really a performer!

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hi everybody,
I've just started to get into blacksmithing with my first brake drum forge. Im in my last year of high school at a tech school so i have vast quantity of materials and machines at my disposal. The legs are 1/2 inch steel threaded with bolts supporting a 2 inch flange.The coupling was machined to accept the diameter of the fan outlet. The motor is the exaust fan off a high efficiency furnace with a light dimmer wired in to save charcoal, which it eats up anyway.

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Pardon my ignorance, but what are those giant cone looking things used for?

Nice forges everyone!

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They are the tyuere of the side graft forge. As they are right in the fire they are either very thick solid steel or water cooled which explains their thickness.

Cheers

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I don't have any picture of mine, but I will describe it in detail:

I use a home built forge that is most likely not very economical were I actually buying my fuel, but since I use home made charcoal... It's base is a wrought Iron table frame about 1 1/2 feet high, and my fire pot is a steel mixing bowl about 15" across, and 6" deep. I use a hairdryer running on cool setting for an air source, and it is a bottom draft assembly. All just basic hardware store parts, made on the cheap. As a table top I have a piece of sheet aluminum with a hole cut for the fire pot to sit in. I haven't lined the bowl with anything yet, tho I probably should as it would make for better fuel consumption... But as is I can get it to white heat, and I have burned off steel in it. works for me... although a the moment, it is disassembled. :unsure:

If I get a chance I will try to post some picture.

KELTOI

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They are the tyuere of the side graft forge. As they are right in the fire they are either very thick solid steel or water cooled which explains their thickness.

Cheers


I know what a tyuere is, I was talking about the large cone thing that was standing on the floor in some of the pics. I would guess it is to make rings or something?

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Frankyluckman,
Not only is your forge an eye catcher, but looks like it is designed to be functional also.

The dome shaped hood is something a person does not see every day.
No doubt your skills and metal working ability played a big part in that you would even consider constructing that complex of a design.

I think the domed shaped hood coupled with the riveted seam that joins the sides, adds an old world mystic about the design.
Now add the cut-out out-lines in the sides of the forge that are highlighted when a fire is burning inside the forge, and wow, it equals eye candy to those who can appreciate what is involved with the processes.
I see the round cut-outs on the sides (about center) that dissect the forge top and hood.
Would I be correct to guess that is so you can lay stock material across the center and lower into the fire?

It is different, but very nice. That is what makes this place interesting and fun!!
Thanks for showing us your forge.
Ted Throckmorton

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Frankyluckman,
Not only is your forge an eye catcher, but looks like it is designed to be functional also.

The dome shaped hood is something a person does not see every day.
No doubt your skills and metal working ability played a big part in that you would even consider constructing that complex of a design.

I think the domed shaped hood coupled with the riveted seam that joins the sides, adds an old world mystic about the design.
Now add the cut-out out-lines in the sides of the forge that are highlighted when a fire is burning inside the forge, and wow, it equals eye candy to those who can appreciate what is involved with the processes.
I see the round cut-outs on the sides (about center) that dissect the forge top and hood.
Would I be correct to guess that is so you can lay stock material across the center and lower into the fire?

It is different, but very nice. That is what makes this place interesting and fun!!
Thanks for showing us your forge.
Ted Throckmorton

I have a question to add to Ted's. How did you vent it to the outside?

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Here's mine, brake drum forge, I've since cut slots in the side for longer work. Legs from half inch square. I've got a bit cast iron sheave pulley on the lower rails now with lots of scrap piled on it. Currently looking to find or fabricate a squarish table out of bed angle iron and plate to give me a bit more room on top.


did u get your forge plans out of a book called "back to basics"?

if you want a table for the top of your forge try an old push lawnmower with fire clay it should fit over the brake drum and give u room to put extra coal!

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I know what a tyuere is, I was talking about the large cone thing that was standing on the floor in some of the pics. I would guess it is to make rings or something?


Jed: you're probably looking at a "Mandrel cone" typically used for truing up circular forgings. Some have a "Tong" groove down one side but I understand it's for working chain but I don't know. The usual explanation is it's to provide clearance for holding the work with a pair of tongs.

Frosty the Lucky

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Made out of 1/8"x1 1/4"x1 1/4" angle iron and 16ga. sheet metal, fire pot is home made out of 3/8" plate. Drafts really good until someone slams the door shut then I get a big puff of smoke in my face. Forge is made to be portable, I can remove a piece of metal from around chimney and roll forge out.

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The $10 bbq forge for charcoal. I made the adobe from my yard, had the electrical parts left over in the garage as well as the tuyere black pipe.

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Hey all, I've been smithing as a hobby for around a year now. I've attached a photo of my old champion forge and the new homemade beast that I just finished. Now I just have to finish the chimney. :)

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My coal forge is a break drum design. Metal 2x4 stud for the frame and 1/8th inch floor plate for the hearth. I use a Bucket Head small shop vac for my air blast with an inexpensive dimmer switch for blast control. It works very very well. And now that the weather has warmed up a little bit, I actually get to use it.

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