Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Side blast forge


kubiack

Recommended Posts

Nicely fabricated!

How are you finding the forge now you've got it up and running? Not so much the size of the hearth, I mean the depth of the pan and the position of the tue in relation to the height of the sides? How are you finding managing fire sizes/angleing work down/laying work across/ getting to the heart of of the fire etc?

I'm curious because I've recently fabricated a side blast forge as well, but to different dimensions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you were aiming that at kubiack but FYI I used some 6mm thick pipe I found. 75mm diameter, not tapered. I have since heard that 100mm might have been better. I remember when researching what pipe to use I saw Alan Evans (I think) saying the pipe has to be thin enough to allow the water to cool the pipe, or it defeats the purpose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cheers Joel - I must admit I did wonder about that. I'm sure there's some maths involved in there somewhere but I assume there is a sweet spot. In the plan linked above Mark used 5" pipe. I was going to use some 3" pipe I had but then found this old steel extinguisher bottle which is 5". I figured more water wouldn't hurt. I also happen to have a thick donut of steel with a 1" hole running through it which would be ideal for the end cap. 

 

How are you finding your tue Joel? Any issues with the lack of taper? 

Andy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really like the way this forge preforms. I played with the depth of the tue in the pan a little before settling on the depth. The only thing I would like to change is to have the cutout on the sides and front a little deeper.

The pipe for the tue was just whatever I could find at the time. It was scrap of something for the oil-field. They use some strange sizes but I think it was close 7/16”. The disk at the front was made from ½” plate. I don’t think you would have any trouble with 1/8 as far as the fire is concerned. The water keeps it plenty cool. I can’t see any degrading of the pipe of the welds. I would be more worried about corrosion on the inside if the pipe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Automotive antifreeze has rust inhibitors, and acualy transfers heat better than plane water. Now, obviously their is an issue with cats I jesting the old green stuff, ethaline glycal is real bad for them, and the only treatment is to mainline ethanol, so use the lower toxicity stuff and lid the bosh. The old green stuff is good for 2 years in a car and the red stuff is good for 5, 50/50 mix is good for most, Frosty might need 25/75...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't had any problems so far Andy. I fabricated my bosh and tue all in one so I just shimmed up the back of the bosh to tilt the tue nose down a smidge. I welded a 20mm plate cap on the end of my tue.

Kubiack, with the depth of the cut outs you have at the minute are you finding you have to build bigger fires than you feel is neccessary so that you can get the heart of the fire high enough in line with the cut outs? When I first fabricated my side blast that's the problem I had as from the centre line of my tue to the top of the sides of my forge was 4", with no cut outs. I have since cut out some sections to reduce that height to 2". I did this after visiting a couple smiths who have always used side blasts and their forges were only 2" deep. I'm much happier with mine now as I can still build big fires, but importantly I don't have to build a big fire just work on something small.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/16/2015 at 4:46 PM, Charles R. Stevens said:

Automotive antifreeze has rust inhibitors, and acualy transfers heat better than plane water. Now, obviously their is an issue with cats I jesting the old green stuff, ethaline glycal is real bad for them, and the only treatment is to mainline ethanol, so use the lower toxicity stuff and lid the bosh. The old green stuff is good for 2 years in a car and the red stuff is good for 5, 50/50 mix is good for most, Frosty might need 25/75...

I do fine with the wood stove, single malt and a little water.

Talking to the HVAC guys about running Propylene Glycol, the less toxic stuff in our boiler and baseboard I was told it doesn't transfer heat as well as clean water until it reaches boiling temperature. At that point being a liquid it transfers heat much better than steam bubbles.

The anti corrosion additives work well and it is a strong penetrant.

Frosty The Lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

I saw Charles recent thread about side blast forges and read this one again. I see there were a few questions I never responded to and I thought I would give an update as I have been using this forge for several years now.

As to the questions of the depth of the side cutouts in relation to the height of the tue. First, I like the height of the top of the sides of the forge in relation to the tue. It works well for getting smaller work down into the fire. However if you want to heat the middle of a long bar and need to run the bar out both sides of the forge then the cutouts are not deep enough for the bar to get to the hottest part of the fire. It would be easy enough to fix however, I do not heat of long bars often so I have just been building the fire up a bit.

The other change I would make to this forge is that I would like the pan to be a bit larges. When I clean the forge in between fires, I rake back all of the unused coke to get to the clinker and ash. The pan of the forge is not large enough to rake it all out with some of it falling off the sides onto the floor. This does not affect the usefulness for the forge but it is annoying that every time I use the forge I have to deal with it. I would like it to be another 8” wider and longer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think I went with 24"x36" for the pan, I'll have to measure to be sure. I can see see 30"x60" being a nice size. I think 30"-32" is just about right for the width and then however long you want to make the length that would fit well in your shop with somewhere around 40" being the minimum I would go. In addition to being a spot to set hot work any extra length on the front would be nice for supporting longer bars that were being heated on the end.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think 30x30 is about right for a shop forge, with the additional 30x30 as a brick table. Any wider and I think reaching the fire could be a drag (unless you 6'8") my mark one dirt box was 30" and it was very comfortable to work with. Being semi ambidextrous I like my hand pump om the right, as I don't have to fumble around with the tongs, that I hold in my left. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...