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Randy

Is the Nazel PH French?

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You know a way back when I was in metal shop it was pien not peen and spell checker don't know pien and it used to be gauge and now it's gage for the thickness of metal and I got tired of seeing it that way so I up and changed that. Some of the words that got changed were of French origin and got put into the English language in or around 1066 and someone decided to up and change them after all the work it took me to learn to spell them, like cheque, catalogue and whole bunch of others. So why did they go and take the "r" out of wash? Now that one really don't make any sense atall.

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Nazel and Hazel rhyme with nasal?? Hmmm. My nose is plugged up. Bentiron: You from Kansas too? We "warsh" our clothes and drive "steeples" into a fence post to hold "bob" wire up.

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My father-in-law says "warsh" with a very hard, distinct R, and he's lived his whole life in the D.C. area. (To be honest, that bugs me. No offense to you guys. It just sounds weird to my ear.) A lot of folks here also say "frigerator." Where I grew up it was a REfrigerator, or a fridge.

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I was born in Indiana and grew up in NM and AZ but my folks were native to IN, it's a Midwestern thing that "r" wash It's like the folk whe say con for corn and then say Chiner for China. I think they saved up all the"r" from corn and add them other words that don't need them..................Now in NM a REfrigerator to the Mexicans no matter the brand was reFrigadaire and a stand alone freeze was a refreeze. My mother worked in the service department of Cartwright's Hardware in Santa Fe and all radios and TVs were RCA's no matter the brand name on it and all wasrher machines were Maytag's.

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Oh boy, Oh boy this is a fun game. I wanna join in and I promise to tie this into the original post.
So as an emigre' to this fair city of brotherly love, I couldn't help but notice that what's spoken around these parts, is to the english language, as velveeta is to cheese. Water is "Wooder" (hard d), Radiator is "Rat-e-ator", Mozzarella is "Mootz-er-el' or my favorite, just mootz". Whilst the person who works with bricks is still called a mason, the type of work he/she does is, paradoxically called, "Masonary work". The first time I heard that, I thought it to be a charming vernacular contraction for a mason that went to seminary school, or one that maybe works for the pope, but I was wrong. The street I live on? Westminster ave.Stand on the corner, point to the sign, and ask any passer by what it says, why "west-min-i-ster". My joke is, Philadelphia is a poor place but they make up for it with a wealth of vowels. Chaminoix blvd, is "shaminy". Wheat chief ave is "wit' chif'". Honestly, its like nobodies even trying. Ironically Philadelphia became a hot bed for the old " speak english or go back to where you came from" camp a little while ago, when xenophobe, troglodyte, cheese steak slinging Rhodes scholar, joey veinto enacted a "Order in english or no steak for you" policy, wherein the naton wide rebuttal was " Who knew that guy knew how to speak english?"
So back to my original point. If the Nazel hammer co. was, in fact, a Philadelphia based company, then the last thing you should do is listen to them, as to how to pronounce anything. Take care, Matt

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I was born in Indiana and grew up in NM and AZ but my folks were native to IN, it's a Midwestern thing that "r" wash It's like the folk whe say con for corn and then say Chiner for China. I think they saved up all the"r" from corn and add them other words that don't need them..................Now in NM a REfrigerator to the Mexicans no matter the brand was reFrigadaire and a stand alone freeze was a refreeze. My mother worked in the service department of Cartwright's Hardware in Santa Fe and all radios and TVs were RCA's no matter the brand name on it and all wasrher machines were Maytag's.


That's interesting, because I grew up in northern Indiana (Elkhart County) and I don't throw in the extra "r" in words like wash. At least if I do, I'm not aware of it. I wonder if it may vary even within the state. I grew up calling soft drinks "pop," but around Indy they tend to call them all "coke," which is a term I associate with the east coast (although it's apparently popular on the left coast, too, and in a lot of big cities in between).

lupiphile, nice tie-in! :)

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