Naz

How do you apply Gilder's paste to metal

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I've had a small can of black Gilder's paste for over a year and only used it once but I don't think it was in the usual way it is used.

I added a small amount to my usual beeswax, boiled linseed and mineral spirits mix to give it a slight darker finish.
The mix gave a dark see through finish that was actually pretty cool.

Anyways, I know this is not the way it is meant to be used and would like to know how some of you that have had success with this product are going at it.

Do you mix the paste with thinner ? other mixes ? How thick do you make your mix ? It is quite dry in the can and seems it would be hard to get it to spread nicely especially in hard to reach areas.

Applied cold ? What do you use to apply it, rags ?

Same preperation of the metal as for the wax/oil finishes ? Wire wheel ? Sand paper ?

Let dry and buff ?

As you can see, any basic info will be appreciated...

Thanks in advance

Naz

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After the surface is prepped, I add it straight onto the metal, then I take a small torch and carefully heat it, I spoke to the maker about this, he was suprised as he believed it would have no effect, but in my work, I find it darkens and makes it a richer color. The colors are a bit bright for me when first applied.

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I had trouble with CRS in areas that didn't require heating or bending. Sometimes it wouldn't look the same or stick well. I started to sand blast the projects that I applied Guilders Paste to. I think the rough finish gave it something to bite into and my overall finish looked even. I have used different colors and used German Silver over the top (wiped on and wiped off) to create a different effect.

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Thanks for the link and personal experiences everyone !

I intend to give it a try soon...

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After cleaning the metal. [i use mineral spirits.] I take a dob of the GP and then dip a small artist brush in clean mineral spirits and mix real well until all is liquid. Then I brush it on. I find that this will get color into any crack or crevass. If using two colors I apply the dark first and then almost dry brush the transition. When dry I polish by hand with a dry flannel cloth.
It can also be applied dry with a cloth or by finger tip.

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I have applied it mostly with a damp cloth, then sprayed a clear coat over the metal to keep the color and give the part some added shine. I also have applied to with alittle water added to the can and a brush.

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Had a go at it a few nights ago and was pleased with the results, I mixed the paste with mineral spirits until I had a "paint-like" thickness.
I used a rag and was able to get the mix easily in all the hard to reach spots, let dry until the next day and buffed with a clean rag.

I will be using this finish again on some of my projects for sure...

Thanks again for all replies !

Naz

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After the surface is prepped, I add it straight onto the metal, then I take a small torch and carefully heat it, I spoke to the maker about this, he was suprised as he believed it would have no effect, but in my work, I find it darkens and makes it a richer color. The colors are a bit bright for me when first applied.


Hey Mike, The "maker" is it a Scotsman and his son? I knew/met/did buisness with them about 15 years ago when they were in Boksburg. Please enquire an if it's them please send them my best wishes. They used to do some amaising things with metal powders and resin-smart boys those!

On the paste, I have regularly used it on powdercoated projects and then powder coated clear over it, that way you get a very durable finnish.

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Hi,
I use a lot of Guilers Paste on forged fire screen frames and furniture/lighting. I have good results using it by pouring a small amount of lacquer thinner into the paste lid, then dipping a 1"throwaway brush into the thinner then gathering some wax from the tin. it's important to not make the mixture too thin, just viscous enough to get into the pors of the metal. As lacquer thinner dries guickly, the brush can be used to somewhat burnish the surface while coating it. Just keep moving the brush and working it in. It's important to not leave streaks in the coating with a too wet coating. Also, too much wax will leave lumps, and will not buff easily. There is a happy medium that you will have to work to find. The best part is that if you don't like the way it looks, simply soak a ray with the thinner and wipe it of and start over.

Lacquer thinner is the fastest drying followed by zylene and the slowest is paint thinner. All three will work. Paint thinner is good to rehab a tin that is a little dry.

The sheen after buffing the dry wax is really appealing to me. Unfortunately, I lose some of that as I clear coat with a satin lacquer mixed 50:50 with flat solvent based lacquer for longevity. If the piece is a really nice one, I'll do a wax finish over the clear coat with Bri Wax to bring back the lustre.
Bri Wax will disolve everything else but lacquer.

Guilders Paste does not do well covering parts that have been welded and ground. It works best on forge pieces that have some tooth and scale.
If, for example, you have a piece such as a forged fire screen frame and welded corners, it its best to reheat the corners with a torch or in a coal forge to scale the welds.

Multiple colors can be achieved by applying over the base color. If some bleed through occurs and that is not acceptable, then clear coat the base color with solvent based lacquer and apply as desired.

I haven't tried Ians clear coating over the Guilders Paste, but have heard that it is successful for outdoor projects.

Hope this helps,

John

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Well I had another go at it and didn't get good results, the finish is extra-easy to scratch and I'm not sure where I went wrong.

Two things come to mind after re-reading the above replies.
1- I wire wheeled all parts to a smooth gray finish (then read John's reply advising not to do this !!!)
2- I may have mixed the 3rd coat of paste with too much thinner (again, this was done prior to reading John's reply advising not to mix too thin !!!)

I suspect the thinner of the 3rd coat has found it's way into the 2 prevous ones, therfore destroying them !

Also, I've added a coat of clear acrylic on top of everything and that did not seem to have adhered either ???

Thanks for all the tips guys, at least I know where I went wrong and will be ready next time !

Tried to add photos and wasn't able, sometimes it works, other times it doesn't. It's like rolling the dice !!!

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