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Mike R

first pounded metal

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Got the forge fired and made my first thing today. Tried of the hearts brian did the how to pictures for.

I used some rebar and I kept burning it but finally got one hammered out. The pics you see are about 3 hours work with getting the fire started and figuring out what I was doing.

Need to get the anvil mounted higher and work on fire control among other things.

I need to build a hot cut for the anvil or just mount in the stump. I ended up using the edge of the RR anvil to cut the rebar then broke off the last bit. My 25 cent cross pien worked good but I need to soak it in antifreeze.

Tomorow we fire up agean and the kids get to try.

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Wasn't my first time but felt like it.... My first attempt was a failure trying for a pair of tongs. Today my aspirations were alot more modest. I made a hold- down out of my failed tongs. And then cut and straightened out a few lengths of auto coil spring. One was like 14 or 15 inches and the other was 8. Tomorrow I plan to make a punch out of the smaller piece and a hot chisel out of the longer one.

I did find that channel lock pliers do not work well at all. It may be I used an old worn out set, but I can really see how a good grabbing set of tongs would make things MUCH easier.

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PJames I tried channle locks with the same result. Didn't work well. Had better luck with some horse show nippers. I ordered a pair of OC wolf jaw tongs this week so should have them by end of coming week. Really interested to try that.

I want to make some tongs but I held a pair of the OC tongs at Marks house last week and they had a real nice feal.

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The kids worked with the forge today. got a lot better fire control today and only took 2 tries to get started. Still heating the metal to much and it is cracking and busting.
Anthony made a nice hook and we drilled the flat spot he made on back but tried to straighten it out and it shattered at the thin end. heated and rebent but the back of the hook was all cracked so we will start over. Kelsey made a nice heart but it had a crack in it also at the bottom bend.
What color should I be heating to to pound on for this scrap metal of unknown composition? Been just heating till it is orange.
I did straighten a piece of spring and start a hot chisle to mark with also. Need to make a hot cut hardie and mount it.

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With some of that scrap you need to make sure not to hit it to cold, or you will get those fractures. Sometimes its better buying some mild steel, I buy mine from a local welder. One thing is you wouldn't have to buy a whole lot making small things and you can select what size you want. It will be more enjoyable for you and the kids. Good luck and have fun.

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When doing tapers don't twirl em no matter what the stock is. Square, then octagon, on to round. Twirling is ok for light finishing blows only. Do your point first, then work it back into the main mass and get it HOT!.......The heart looks good.

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What is that coil? A spring? It look a little like a truck or car leaf spring to me. It's that's what it is, then it's high carbon steel which means water quenching is a no-go. Quenching in oil just letting it cool should prevent fractures.

Zachary

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Thanks I will go to the steel yard and get some round stock to try. Pounding to cold could definatly be part of the problem. I will keep trying with that in mind.

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Note that A-36; commonly sold as "mild steel" these days can harden in thin section if it's cold out. DON'T QUENCH IT AT ALL. Let it cool off preferably someplace where it won't chill too fast in contact.

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I am working outside and it is starting to snow so that could be an isshue. Is there a better steel to use?

Thanks
Mike

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