Borntoolate

What I learned from 2 Days With Brian

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22 hours ago, SReynolds said:

May I ask? Why did you mention you want your heat above the metal in your list?

A new Brian Technique? 

I don't think it was a new technigue but rather a basic.   it was really just about having the metal totally surrounded by heat both top and bottom.   I was at times laying the metal on top of the heat but not necessarily immersing the metal in heat all around.  Or not getting enough fuel hot enough all around.   

The golden flame was something Brian mentioned and I think it means that you have good conditions for high heat without too much O2 but enough to make things heat fast.    The golden flame was noticeable.

22 hours ago, SReynolds said:

May I ask? Why did you mention you want your heat above the metal in your list?

A new Brian Technique? 

also, I am very frugal.   So I was cranking on the blower in a minimalist way rather than an effective way.   It used to to take too long to get things hot.   He was more telling me to make it very hot very fast rather than be frugal which wastes time and is frankly annoying.

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My take is that mathematically the integral of ( knowledge divided mankind) from one to many equals zero,  or "more and more know less and less until everyone knows nothing"

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Not that I'm an expert, but different colors of flame will happen with different solid fuels as well as what is being heated in them.... (coal) based ones that is.. soft coal  when the fire is soft (all green coal has coked) the flame will stay a blue till you start to approach welding heat with steel then it will turn to a orangy yellow..   It's one of the signs you are approaching welding heat.. When using a borax based welding flux it will change color a little sooner but still same deal.. Otherwise for general forging it will stay the blue color as long as it has good coke to add.. 

While fire management is a tough one to teach over the internet it is one of the most important with a soft coal forge..  Since I'm old school I still bank up my fire with the project in mind and then use it and feed it as need be.. Of course if I'm doing a lot of welding the coal piled up around the heart of the fire will be dramatically larger as it then becomes a fuel eating machine as the green coal cokes and gets fed into the fire vs making smaller nails or such..  

So, as to where the best heat is depends a lot on what one does with the fuel and how it's fed into the fire as well as how much blast, and also how many fines are in the fire.. 

Lots of people love to hear the fire and blowing dust and such out of it... This is all well and good if there are not many fines as the air will work it's way pretty much straight up. But if there are fines it will choke off the airflow directly above and push this airflow towards the sides and next you know you have a fire that is a whopper and then have to contain it with water or rebank the green coal.. 

 

Simple answer is it depends on fuel, type of fuel and quality of fuel..  Well thats not quite so simple anymore.. :) 

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