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Borntoolate

Best Firepot Suggestions

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I am looking for advice on either a replacement firepot or possibly a modification to my existing one. I am leaning toward a purchase of something along the lines of "the last Firepot you'll ever need."

I currently have a home made brake drum forge. The drum in about 9" inches wide at the top. In the bottom I have a 1/4" plate with about five 1/2" holes. A champ 400 stands to the side. It feels as though I don't get the heat that I might get from a "real" firepot. This may be due to poor operation or my set-up. I am prepared to spend the cash to purchase a "proper" fire pot and am looking for advice on what others suggest to purchase or suggest to avoid.

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I was gonna post the same thing..Roger Lorance, Very reasonably priced as well...When my homemade pot finally goes Im gonna get one of his..

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My "unreal" brakedrum firepot does great. With a little inattention I can melt and burn up some pretty large pieces. My drum has a 12" diameter and works great. So far it looks like it will outlast me. I just started to make a new 55 forge yesterday and am re-using the old brakedrum.
You may have an airflow problem and your 1/4" holes may be clogging with clinkers as you forge.
However If you can afford to do so, go for it. No one should settle for less than they have to or want to if they can afford it.

Mark <><

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The BEST depends on how you plan to be using it. What is GREAT for one type of work may be TERRIBLE for another.

BTAIM I have been using a firepot made from an axle cover from a Banjo Rear end for about 25 years now and doing a lot of forge welding in it during those years. I bought two of them that had been made into jack stands so I have a spare when this one gives out. I usually use a piece of expanded metal for a grate so it's more hole than solid and use a hand crank blower. Oh yes it cost me US$3 for the pair. (It's in it's 3rd or 4th forge btw and about ready for the next one...)

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i posted that Im gonna get one of rogers pots and I am, but mostly for the clinker breaker and just to try one out.I like the design and heavy casting.My currect pot is fabricated from 1/2" plate. I weld a lot but it hasnt shown a bit of wear in two years.The grate is removable and fabricated from 1/2" rebar.I wish I had fabricated a clinker breaker when I made it but I didnt..As it is now we have to use a rake to clean the fire and bring out clinker...Not that big a deal but Id still like to have a breaker.

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KYBOY and Brian. I called the number but the message made me think it was the wrong number. I see the pots for sale on Piehtools for $248. Doesn't look like it has the Tuyere and so forth. Is there a Website or other phone number? OR is 309-475-9012 for sure it?

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How does one use the clinker breaker on the Lorance Rig?
Is it a full rotation or a wiggle back and forth? How often, semi continuous or only once after several hours?
Never used one O these. Right now I just have a plate with holes and a poker.

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How does one use the clinker breaker on the Lorance Rig?
Is it a full rotation or a wiggle back and forth? How often, semi continuous or only once after several hours?
Never used one O these. Right now I just have a plate with holes and a poker.



BTL
You will need to use it "semi-periodically" (a completely meaningless term I found most amusing during my years in the Army.) You will notice the fire begin to slow and become less resposive to the blower. That's the time to wiggle or rotate the clinker breaker. It won't take much unless there is a really big booger down there. Don't forget the ash dump. That will also need semi-periodic attention.

Bill

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Some coals and tasks you might not use it at all, others you may be using it every half hour or so *DEPENDING*.

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Firepot and B2 swage on order :)
More to come. I got Brian coming in late october for 2 days. Should have it running by then. But may need some advice setting it up right. When it comes in I'll post some pics of the current set-up and plans for installing the new firepot. This will be a big change for me as I just got into this stuff about a year ago by seat of my pants and a gas home made forge. Wasn't til January this year I went to coal. I'll be looking for advice on proper set up. So brian I'll be looking for your thoughts as well as others. I am still pretty clueless and feeling my way here. When you come in Oct I'd like to use my stuff as much as possible to see how you can help me see what I need to change both hardware, knowledge, technigue and experience etc to help me be more effective. I am real slow at this stuff. :wub:

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Something I've done is put a weight on the side opposite the clinker breaker handle. The horizontal handle shank has an extension on the other side of the tuyere valve (the breaker). I weld a vertical rod to it, maybe 6" to 8" long, with a weight on the bottom. The valve returns to center by gravity.

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Frank is that some sort of monsignor's hat you are wearing? I would have guessed you as more of a archbishop type in the Church of Iron.

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My first pot was fabbed from 3/4" steel plate and was simply an inverted truncated pyramid with a single slot cut into the bottom. The opening dimensions were 12x10 and depth was almost 4". Underneath, the piping was a 3" T that hooked to a 400 Champion blower. The slot was 1/2" wide by 3" long with no clinker breaker. This design worked well as it shot the blast straight up and could be easily cleared with a small poker (just knock the junk into the ash pipe). I didn't invent this from scratch but basically copied an old Champion "Whirlwind" cast iron coke pot (which had three slots and was shallow but very thick).

The only problem I have ever seen with steel pots is that they seem to burn out faster than cast iron but that's offset by the fact they are cheap to replace. Steel also won't crack like cast iron if it overheats or is accidentally doused with too much water. In addition, other pot types such as side blast tuyeres can be made from plain old black pipe and replaced quickly when they do burn out.

I think cast iron became the material of choice for bottom blast pots primarily because they were cheap to make in mass production - not because steel was necessarily inferior as a component.

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This is my current forge that I want to add the new firepot to. It is 2'x2' plate with a break drum mounted flush underneath. So there is no lip extending above the 2x2 plate. So I guess with my new pot there will be about a 1" to 3/4" lip above on the sides. I guess that is what I want though I don't really understand that.

Would you mount the Tuyere dump lever to the front ot back. Currently mine is in the back and it is easy to dump using a bucket to push the lever while up after the bucket is fully underneath.

Anyway, does anyone have any nifty suggestion on how I should redo this. I would even consider making a complete new forge if I had compelling info to do so. I would then sell this one as it has worked for me quite satisfactorily so far.

Would you mount the pot off center for any reason? Best would be a few pics of your forge with some good pointers

I am editing this post to say that I will start a new thread since this is at the bottom of a post that is titled something different. The new post title will be Coal Forge Design Considerations Dos and Don'ts

post-16782-0-54619000-1316453658_thumb.j

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I mounted my brake drum off center in the sheet of metal I use for a table. While I don't regret it, I wonder if centered would have been better. There was a hole that I contained in the cutout, so centered was not much of an option, although it could have been more centered than I have it. I do find I am pushing fuel off the table at times.

Phil

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