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Making a Bayonet

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I am trying to figure out the easiest way to make a bayonet for my dog-lock trade musket. It can compensate a socket bayonet but was really made for a plug; which I don't want. I'd like to make my own socket bayonet and don't know how. I think I need a swedge. post-21154-0-24799500-1311439249_thumb.j

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Every socket bayonet that I own, or have seen has had the socket bored out to a close fit. Drifting first can lead to problems later. I would say to forge the main blank , then drill/ream the socket to fit.

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Some times poking around gun shows you can still find an old bayonet that would look just about right for the period. If you didn't have to pay and arm and a leg for it I'd be tempted to buy that and use the blade and then make my own socket and then weld the blade to the socket. Yeah, I know not quite Kosher but I think a better outcome than making the whole thing from scratch. ;)

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I have used the AK- 47 bayonet several times. I have made 3 sword canes using them and a socket bayonet for a Brown Bess musket. The long 1903 or the Enfield bayonet make good sword type bayonets.

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I am trying to figure out the easiest way to make a bayonet for my dog-lock trade musket. It can compensate a socket bayonet but was really made for a plug; which I don't want. I'd like to make my own socket bayonet and don't know how. I think I need a swedge. post-21154-0-24799500-1311439249_thumb.j


I have an unmarked and unidentified socket bayonet. The triangular blade is about 14 inches long, and has a straight taper from about 11/4 at the widest to the point. The top of the blade is flat and the lower is deeply fullered to form the lower two sides, separated by a narrow spine. The tang is integral with the blade and is about 2.5 inches long and is bent 90 degrees to the socket.

The tang is forge welded to the socket. The socket looks like it was made from a sheet that had been rolled into a cylinder and welded. It was not reamed to make the interior perfectly round and smooth. The barrel attachment is a Z-shaped groove that extends from the rear of the socket, on the same plane as the blade. There is a punched 1/8 inch hole on top of the socket (bayonet on a flat surface, with the blade on the left side). It does not have a locking ring.

I bought the bayonet in a junk store long ago, thinking that it might be a Confederate piece. It is similar to18th century French bayonets. It is well made and appears to be a production product but, imperfectly, pre-industrial.

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