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large grinding stone repair???


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Okay. That large grinding Stone I spoke of a few weeks ago. Well I finally got to it today. Unfortunately, it has a piece broken off one side. Making a 5 inch wide stone go to about 1 1/2 inches For about 8-10 inches of the circumstance.
So although the rest is in great shape. And is almost 30 inches tall.
Question is :; HOW CAN I REPAIR THIS. I'LL POST PICTURES LATER. BUT IS THERE ANYWAY I CAN BUILD THIS UP WITH DEVCON OR SOME TYPE OF SOMETHING.
I'm more concerned about Just filling in the broke piece and making it round again. As far as using it for sharpening. I would have plenty of it left and could Just let It float over That part. I was so excited To find it and a backhoe bucket broke It.
Not my doing. But want to at least fix it enough to be worthy of building a stand for it and having it rotate without such a heavy side.
So is there anyway to fix this. Cause if not it will be setting in the flower bed and I'll see it everyday and get pissed off When I think about how something that has been it the family For over a hundred years and I finally get it back, just To have it messed up.
Any help would be Appreciated. I Am Just upset about it. But its so big And such a pretty Stone. I wanna show it off. More than use it.
Help me please. !!!!!!!!!

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Post a pic. Easier to suggest something when we can visualize the problem better.

Do you have the chunk that broke off? If so you could epoxy it back on. What ever you do you will want something that wears about the same as the wheel will. You might have to do some experimenting on this with different concoctions like maybe a Fix-All and sand mix.

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A pic would help.

Using a rotary tool with an appropriate bit you can cut a ring off the stone. Fasten the tool to the frame and rotate the stone by hand to cut it in multiple passes. This is safest as the fractured stone is removed. This will reduce your diameter and true the stone.

I presume this is a foot powered stone, so 50-100 rpm is the max it can go, depending on how you pedal. Exceeding this is very dangerous even for a stone in excellent condition.

Depending on what you are planing on doing you can profile the stone instead using a similar method. Avoid sharp internal corners.

Phil

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A pic would help.

Using a rotary tool with an appropriate bit you can cut a ring off the stone. Fasten the tool to the frame and rotate the stone by hand to cut it in multiple passes. This is safest as the fractured stone is removed. This will reduce your diameter and true the stone.

I presume this is a foot powered stone, so 50-100 rpm is the max it can go, depending on how you pedal. Exceeding this is very dangerous even for a stone in excellent condition.

Depending on what you are planing on doing you can profile the stone instead using a similar method. Avoid sharp internal corners.

Phil


Rotary tool is a good idea, but what kind of bit would you use for that? Mine didn't have a big chunk missing, but I did have to take about 3/4 off the radius to get rid of a big swell (probably from a chunk breaking off then continued use). I used an old carbide tip saw blade, I held it on it's side, and moved it back and forth using one tooth at a time to cut into the wheel. Once I got past the defect, I just ground into some bar stock to take down the high grooves that were left by my less than perfect dressing method.

post-16770-0-47876600-1298436072_thumb.j

P.S. Taking 3/4" off of a 20 inch or so diameter wheel took me several dusty and painful hours. The seat on my grinder wasn't meant for that kind of endurance race, and it's a heck of a workout. I don't highly recommend it, but it does work.
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Rotary tool is a good idea, but what kind of bit would you use for that?


I would start with a rotozip tile bit, or more likely several. I don't know if there is a better tool.

A side thought. My wife's grandfather built a horizontal kick grinder. He used a largish natural stone on it, as well as several artificial stones. I think gravity is all that holds the stones in place. I haven't looked at it closely since Grandpa Jim was alive.

Phil
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I think the damage is to the *width* not the diameter and I would not recommend taking that stone down to the thinnest width as it would have little stability then.

As mentioned have you thought of mounting it horizontally with the good side up and working on the side of the stone?

This type of grinder is not designed for hogging off metal; more for touching up an edge already established by forging and filing.

The grind stones for shaping tended to be *MASSIVE*---like 8-12' in diameter and used in factories.

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Slight thread hijack, but someone recently posted a link here to a site that contains a video of a German swordsmith in Solingten using a good sized old grindestone that looks like it's probably water powered. The grinding starts between 1/3 and 1/2 into the video. Fascinating to watch. The "hockey goalie" shin devices are very interesting. Looks like they mate up with the wooden board that the sword is mounted on to give a consistent bevel angle.

http://www.schwertbruecken.de/deutsch/test_video1.htm

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The break is on the side all the way out to the outer / grinding edge. I'll post pictures as soon as I can.
But the rock.is five inches thick and since the break.its down to abour 2 inches For about 8 inches of the radius.
the wheel.is 30 inches tall. So I have 75% of the grinding surface left. Thought That if I could build it up I might keep it from having such a heavy side And make it useable.
But the side ways action is a thought. Cause It does have a good side if used horizontaly.
Hate to be so vague about it all. But I ain't able to get it home cause of just getting to It now. The ground is so messed up. So Please bare with me. I'm not trying to be so dumb about it. But I'm not good at explaining things. Thanks For any and all help.

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  • 10 years later...

Oh MAN you did it again! We might've really gotten Bill going if you hadn't spoiled it for the rest of us. You're no fun. :rolleyes:

Frosty The Lucky.

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Hey it's useful information!  Does the stone have to be "absolutely dry" to have JB weld work? (Of course I sold off the 4 treadle grinders I got in the hoard.)

 

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