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Polishing Wheels for A bench Motor


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I finally had the chance to pull the covers off the grinding/polishing wheels and see what it is we use here at work. It's a 8S ESL deburr and finishing wheel from 3M. We have both the medium and fine.
If you've never had a chance to use a bench grinder with a polishing wheel, these things are amazing. Their cost is about $60 each for a 6"x1" wheel, but I have to say it's more than worth it. I think it would be great for anyone who knows the polishing process as these can be much more aggressive than anything done by hand still, but it's not a bad place to start learning either.

I just thought i'd mention it in passing as I'm planning on buying a Baldor motor and a couple of wheels at Christmas time. If anyone happens to decide to get one to try, let me know what you think. It's almost better than sliced bread.

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  • 1 year later...

Whats the danger behind polishing? I find that there is never a reason to go directly against an edge, which is ultimately the only thing that can catch on a blade and send it into your boot or through your hand. If you are always polishing with the bevel or any abrupt edge facing away from the wheel, what can go wrong?

I need to get a good polishing setup.. doing it by hand is...enlightening and all, but a quick buff for a christmass blade would be nice.

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  • 3 months later...
If all of your polishing is easy to get at. If there is any intricacy to the piece you run the risk of catching a too close edge.


I know exactly what you are talking about! It happened to me about 3 1/2 years ago:
Was in the shop and had to polish an old carbon steel blade, cause that time I didn
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You might take a look at the safety demos over at anvilfire's i-forge section. Pics of what a wirebrush and a hook being cleaned up did to a fellow.

Powered wirebrushes and buffers stay awake all night trying to figure out ways to maim you! You have got to be on your toes using them!

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This is one thing Thomas and I agree on 100% the buffing wheel/bench grinder is determined to get us if we don't watch out.

They are the single most dangerous machine in our shops. Use only with total concentration, and care. Any one that does not agree, has been very lucky so far.

respect all power tools, as One of my teachers told me, Tools can injure, power tools can maim, and fast.

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the only thing I didn't see mentioned.
Stay away from a "leading edge of any piece" only work a "trailing edge". Any "leading edge" can still be worked and become a trailing edge by turning the piece around.
And the only place on the wheel that you should work is the lower front quadrant. IF your looking at the wheel from the side, imagine the wheel divided into four quadrants. The center line......could be considered the horizon......stay below the horizon, in that lower front quadrant.
Many times folks get into trouble by not paying attention and "wandering" up above the horizon line....and as they put more force on the piece.........it tends to get grabbed and the force is increased at the horizon line...that's usually when it gets Ripped out of your hand.
be careful out there. I've heard it said, "it's a poor craftsman, that blames his tools".

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Ok. We all know that power tools are inherently dangerous, especially if you don't give it your full & undivided attention. But we all have them, use them & love them. My question is this. For those of us who have yet to aquire, but are looking into, a powered polishing tool/system. What would the best choice be? I know there are many variables to consider. But for, say, tools & knife blades as one example. For the hobbyist. What would a good choice be? Weighing safety, function, safety, final outcome, safety, etc.... ????????????

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For my jewelry I have a HF bench grinder with tapered spindles. I removed the wheel guards, installed the tapered spindles, then spun the muslin wheels on. One thing to be sure to do when using polishing wheels is to wear a face mask and face shield. Inhaling the grit and cotton particles just ain't healthy and getting something thrown in your face hurts like crazy. Never polish small chain on a wheel, use a tumbler with steel shot. Wear gloves, the metal get hot quick and when it gets hot you tend to get careless.

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Safety guards are required when using grinding, polishing wheels. They will catch on the metal and throw it back at you. The only question is when and how hard, but it WILL happen.

drove the chunk of steel through my 3/4 inch plywood bench top.
This is the force you must consider when choosing a safety shield for the eyes, face, and body. Choose wisely.
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  • 2 months later...

The buffer is one of the most dangerous tools in my shop. It sits out there waiting for chances at trying to kill me. When i was working on a throwing spike, using the loose canvas wheel, it pulled the knife out of my hand and stuck it into a particle board wall. I thought it was cool, then got to thinking that that wall could have been me. Also, does anyone know a place that still sells the bricks of polishing compound? I looked at lowes and HF, and all they have are those tiny sticks.

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IFrom that day on and till today, also for the future, I use(d) cotton gloves covered with chain gloves and over all a leather glove for the grip. To protect my chest and other front bodyparts I wear a chain apron and never had problems again.....
;)

Badger


Where do you get the chain gloves and apron?
Thanks William
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I wonder if that's spelled right?

Just bought an 8"x2" and a 10x1/2" from ebay for about $20 each 3M brand. Did some test pieces and you are absolutely right. I think of them as blending wheels which do not gouge like hard stones and do not grab like buffing wheels. I have buffed/polished quite alot and while feeling comfortable enough I like using a wheel that is inherently safer than one and more forgiving than the other.

Dave

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