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Jose Torres

Jeweler's Hand Saw or coping saw

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hi i am starting my first stock removeal knife and i dont know the difference between a Jeweler's Hand Saw and a copingsaw a need something that will cut out rounded shapes by hand i know i can file it but maybe a saw might be a little faster ?

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If you're finding it in your local hardware store, then it is a coping saw. It might be used for this, but the teeth are likely to be a little too coarse. A coping saw usually has a one piece frame and there are little pins in the blade that hold it in place. A jeweler's saw frame usually has an adjustment for length and clamps at each end to hold the blade. Jeweler's saw-blades are smaller and have tiny teeth, they are darn close to microscopic.

The learning curve on a jeweler's saw can be kind of steep, especially in steel without anyone around to give you pointers. For the broad curves on a knife blade I would just cut straight lines with a hacksaw and then file or grind to shape.

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There are hacksaw blades made for coping saws. They are smaller than typical hacksaw blades and will handle curves better (though not as well as a jeweler's saw). But you may or may not find them in local stores.
Mostly the difference is the material. Coping saws are for wood and plastic generally and jeweler's saws are more for metal and most blades for jeweler's saws are designed for thin stock.

ron

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oops, I forgot to post the link to a jewelry supply catalog with pictures

Jeweler's saw frame http://www.riogrande.com/MemberArea/ProductPage.aspx?assetname=110132&page=GRID&category|category_root|120=Bench+Tools+and+Equipment&category|cat_120|340=Saw+Blades+and+Frames&t=s

blades http://www.riogrande.com/MemberArea/ProductPage.aspx?assetname=110050&page=GRID&category|category_root|120=Bench+Tools+and+Equipment&category|cat_120|340=Saw+Blades+and+Frames&t=s

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Coping saws for wood are usually not as rigid as jeweler's saws. Also jeweler's saws are designed to let you keep using a saw blade after it breaks by reducing the length of the saw.

Learning how to properly use a jeweler's saw will pay off big time!

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