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Hi, All.

I bought one of Grant's spring fullers and reforged the shank to fit my hardy hole - grinding was taking forever. In the process I manage to deform one of the holes that the fullering rods go into. I am wondering if I am better of drilling the holes or drifting them? The next question is size. The rods are 1/2" in. Does that call for a 1/2" hole? What size does the drift have to be to get a half inch finished hole?

Thanks!

Eric

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Not knowing what Grants spring fullers look like or how they fit together, and what HT situation is, or how badly the hole walls are deformed it would be guesswork as to which would be best, normally if you need a 1/2" hole restoring, I would go for a drift as this should restore the hole to its original configuration, then if necessary, size the hole with a drill or reamer.

Grant would probably give the definitive answer.

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Not knowing what Grants spring fullers look like or how they fit together...


Here's a link to the item: http://www.blacksmithsdepot.com/Templates/cart_templates/cart-detail.php?theLocation=/Resources/Products/Anvil_Tools_and_Swages/Spring_Fuller

It's basically a 1" rectangular shank bored to accept two 1/2" rods perpendicular to the shank. The lower of the two would rest on the anvil. The upper rod is forged with a flat section, which becomes the spring. It seats in the far side of the shank, the spring section arches over the shank the returns the fuller rod parallel to the bottom rod.

The upper hole seems perfectly intact but has some scale or such in it that restricts the hole. The lower hole is seriously distorted. My thought is to drift back to round and as close to final size as I can. My concern is that if I drift to 1/2" I don't know what the final size will be when it cools. I can drift larger but don't have a good selection of stock in in-between sizes to make a 17/32" or so drift and don't quite yet have the forging skills to forge a perfect cylinder in which case I'll probably end up with a larger than necessary not quite round hole! Oh, well. I may even forge a new shank out of mild steel then drill but would need to buy bits for that size.

What to do? What to do?
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I really had a belly laugh when I saw the title of your post! I'm old enough to remember the REALLY common remark when I was a kid: "he doesn't know whether he's punched or bored"!Nowadays only we blacksmiths know what that means!!!! Eric Sprado


Eric,

I know what you mean! One time I was on a photography forum and a topic was titled something like "How to shoot children". As a teacher I had the same feeling - context really makes a difference!

~Eric Wiener
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Here's a link to the item: http://www.blacksmit...s/Spring_Fuller

It's basically a 1" rectangular shank bored to accept two 1/2" rods perpendicular to the shank. The lower of the two would rest on the anvil. The upper rod is forged with a flat section, which becomes the spring. It seats in the far side of the shank, the spring section arches over the shank the returns the fuller rod parallel to the bottom rod.

The upper hole seems perfectly intact but has some scale or such in it that restricts the hole. The lower hole is seriously distorted. My thought is to drift back to round and as close to final size as I can. My concern is that if I drift to 1/2" I don't know what the final size will be when it cools. I can drift larger but don't have a good selection of stock in in-between sizes to make a 17/32" or so drift and don't quite yet have the forging skills to forge a perfect cylinder in which case I'll probably end up with a larger than necessary not quite round hole! Oh, well. I may even forge a new shank out of mild steel then drill but would need to buy bits for that size.

What to do? What to do?


Personally, if the fuller rods are 1/2" material, I would drift to 1/2" and check for fitment. Then, if they are too tight, you can always chase with the next sized drill bit or reamer.
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Here's a link to the item: http://www.blacksmithsdepot.com/Templates/cart_templates/cart-detail.php?theLocation=/Resources/Products/Anvil_Tools_and_Swages/Spring_Fuller

It's basically a 1" rectangular shank bored to accept two 1/2" rods perpendicular to the shank. The lower of the two would rest on the anvil. The upper rod is forged with a flat section, which becomes the spring. It seats in the far side of the shank, the spring section arches over the shank the returns the fuller rod parallel to the bottom rod.

The upper hole seems perfectly intact but has some scale or such in it that restricts the hole. The lower hole is seriously distorted. My thought is to drift back to round and as close to final size as I can. My concern is that if I drift to 1/2" I don't know what the final size will be when it cools. I can drift larger but don't have a good selection of stock in in-between sizes to make a 17/32" or so drift and don't quite yet have the forging skills to forge a perfect cylinder in which case I'll probably end up with a larger than necessary not quite round hole! Oh, well. I may even forge a new shank out of mild steel then drill but would need to buy bits for that size.

What to do? What to do?

As Dodge says, and I said in initial post, go for a drift as this should restore the hole to its original configuration, then if necessary, size the hole with a drill or reamer.

All you need is a piece of 1/2" bar (shank of a bolt, or cut off a small length from the piece that fits through the hole in the tool and taper the ends to make a drift) then if the hole is still tight if you haven't got a drill of the correct size, you can use a round file or a make a polishing stick from a strip of emery cloth placed in a slot sawn down the axis of a wood dowel smaller than the hole size, and hold the dowel in a drill chuck, place this emery stick in the hole turn on the drill and move the drill back and forth to open the hole slightly.

Or invest in a drill bit of the correct size, but preferably still drift first, otherwise you will end up with an odd shaped hole which will misalign what fits into it.
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As Dodge says, and I said in initial post, go for a drift as this should restore the hole to its original configuration, then if necessary, size the hole with a drill or reamer.

All you need is a piece of 1/2" bar (shank of a bolt, or cut off a small length from the piece that fits through the hole in the tool and taper the ends to make a drift) then if the hole is still tight if you haven't got a drill of the correct size, you can use a round file or a make a polishing stick from a strip of emery cloth placed in a slot sawn down the axis of a wood dowel smaller than the hole size, and hold the dowel in a drill chuck, place this emery stick in the hole turn on the drill and move the drill back and forth to open the hole slightly.

Or invest in a drill bit of the correct size, but preferably still drift first, otherwise you will end up with an odd shaped hole which will misalign what fits into it.


Thanks! That sounds like a good plan.
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