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Thats what it has always been called as I have known, the first steam hammer I had seen as a younger man, seems cute today. A bit of history and a good old rebuild to come, after I remove the bird nest :D

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Save the nest,it may come in handy for the little visitors when the warm weather comes back again.
Nice find,looks like your shop may end up as a museum if you keep this up.Know anybody that can write a grant(and not the kind of Grant that lives on the left coast although he pounds iron too)? ;)

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Interesting... So its really a Air hammer and not a steam hammer hu? Wonder what the differences are? Doesnt look much diffrent from the 3 CH in my yard...4644354929_3bfe2eaf15.jpg

Have you ever seen it run?

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It say here the only difference was the non-metallic rings, nothing changed but the ram weight until you hit 400#. My friend has a 300 in town that I have run and I watch your vid, seems pretty fast, can't imagine BPM the 100 would do!

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I was mistaken there is less tolerance in the air hammer from the factory. Measured the main valve at 2.744 and the valve body at 2.76, piston is 4.981 and cylinder 4.995 if this helps you determine what you have Larry.

Spoke to Charles a representative of Ajax-CECO Main Tel: (440) 295-0244 x 396 he explained the tolerance difference and gave me some interesting information.

The records of the machines around your serial number. It looks as though there were Fifty-Nine(59) 200 lb Utility Hammers build for the Army Corp of Engineers for $2,422.68 each. Machine serial numbers range from 757-L through 815-L. Very few of them say they were owned by any one else so maybe the government still has them in mothballs somewhere. The hammer went to Des Moines in 57 and Birmingham in 85 where the man I bought it from got it.

Unloaded, pulled the safety cap off to reveal some minor scaring of the cylinder. Then removed the die placed a pin in the ram and let it fall to release the piston. One ring was broke which had caused the scared piston wall but the piston cleaned up well and I am hopeful a little honing will fix the cylinder. I would assume a small amount of blow by will not effect the performance if I don't get it all out. Ordering a couple new rings and it should be ready to rock and roll!

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