Don A

Kettle Stand and Outdoor Cooking Implements

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Several weeks ago, I solicited a lot of good advice for forging / fabricating a stand for a big iron pot.

Here's how it turned out:

post-124-086849900 1277905549_thumb.jpg

This is part of an outdoor, brush-arbor kitchen that a young man is doing as part of his Eagle Scout work.
He has been commissioned to design and set up all of the stuff at a local late 18th Century historic site.

Here's the whole rig:

post-124-022354600 1277905558_thumb.jpg

Thanks again to everyone who advised on turning the big ring. This was a fun job (not very cost effective, but fun).

Don

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NICE job Don! Give the young man my compliments please. I LOVE scouts and Scouting.

Frosty the Lucky.

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Wish I had been interested in blacksmithing when I did my Eagle project. Nice work and one luck eagle to be given this opportunity.

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I picked up a job during my forge of July campout to make a stand for a 20 gallon copper soup pot---they were using one I previously made off of a 1570 AD illustration but it's wasn't sized for that pot. Nice to know that it withstood 150 pounds though! All forge welded too.

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I did this one with the big rivets, but also with hidden arc welds in the joints. This was by an informed agreement with the customer.

I would have obliged them with all forge welds, but their budget wouldn't allow for the difference.

Everybody knows that the first one of anything you make is always the most time consuming. I learned a lot from this project, so hopefully, if I ever do another one, it will go a lot quicker.

One of the biggest things I learned is how badly I need an O/A torch if I am going to be doing many big rivets.

Thanks,

Don

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That toasting fork set up is interesting. Can we have a close up pic of what's keeping that fork in place? Seems to be defying gravity.

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Devobob1 I would suggest you contact the very active Oklahoma smithing group, www.saltforkcraftsmen.org and find a local smith to make you one---easier to get measurements and cuts down on shipping costs.

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Not ment as a criticism ... but as an observation, ... I've never seen a Kettle Stand with 4 legs .....

 

Around this area, they are widely known and often referred to in Auction bills, ... as a "Kettle & Three Foot".

 

 

Sometimes, the legs on the old ones become loose, and need to have the Rivets re-struck ( or the legs pinned ) ... indicating that they were never welded, at all.

 

 

 

.

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SmoothBore, good observation.

 

If I were ever to make any kind of stand for something like that, it would only be a "three-legger".  On uneven surfaces, four legs will almost never be stable, but three legs always will be.  Goes for stools, too.  :)

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Ausfire, if you Google "rebar squirrel cookers" and you'll get some great images on how it's done!


Nice job Don!   :)  

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Folks these were meant to be used on DIRT; one leg a bit high you just whack it down into the dirt a bit more.  I've seen a bunch of spiders of a differing number of legs.    Now if it's going to be on a hard surface---brick hearth, etc then the 3 legs come into play.

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