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Ok... I have been checking out every web resource on power hammers I can find for a couple years now...

The boss (wife) has finally given up on keeping smithing out of the back yard and I have about 12x6 feet of space which I have been getting a cozy smithy operational. Now with surgery coming up on the other shoulder (the hammering one now) and a bad case of tennis elbow in my hammering arm, I would REALLY like to build a power hammer!

My area is pretty cramped already so space is definitely a concern. I keep thinking about this mini power hammer I saw on YouTube at:

rtsp://v8.cache1.c.youtube.com/CkYLENy73wIaPQkFE4XCyyAl1hMYESARFEIJbXYtZ29vZ2xlSARSBXdhdGNoWg5DbGlja1RodW1ibmFpbGDE-7iC86e-iUwM/0/0/0/video.3gp

And wanted to get some input on the idea of a tiny power hammer - I'd even go so far to call it The POWER GUILLOTINE - a 5-10 pound ram with a 50 pound anvil.

I would use some guides like in the one on YouTube to keep it simple and it could be bolted to my workbench with a foot pedal connected to the idler pulley via an adjustable length light chain...

I made up a basic sketch that I will scan in this evening but I just finished going through searching for any other posts and can't find something along these lines.

I work on stock below 3/4" - most of the time under 1/2" so I think this might suite my needs (for now - until I have more space). Any thoughts or suggestions?

Eric

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I've seen a number of mini powerhammers built that drop into the hardy hole of an anvil and use the anvil for the anvil. I believe it was Ed Rhoades (sp?) of SOFA than built a number of these that worked quite well for small stuff.

Thomas

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Thomas,

Thanks for the info - I managed to find some posts on a bladesmith forumn with a pretty good description of the mini hammer in question... Just can't seem to find any pictures.

Got all my materials together except the pillow blocks... Got a guy who said he has a couple hundred solid brass light duty pillow blocks he needs to get rid of; hope to get my hands on them by the end of the week.

Eric

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My 1/4hp motor came from a large standing fan and has 3 speetings: 300,900,1200 rpm.

I have a 3.5" pulley on the motor and plan on using an 11" pulley for the crank. This gives me a circumference ratio of 3.14:1 and should give me 96,286,382 bpm. I expect a bit of slip with the V-Belt so if I lose 20% of my bpm I won't be too disappointed.

This is going to be my prototype that I get some experience on before I build my big one - already have a 70# ram, the guides and most of the frame for it - just need an anvil and to decide on its drive method. It will also be good for traveling (this mini one)

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I have a 3.5" pulley on the motor and plan on using an 11" pulley for the crank. This gives me a circumference ratio of 3.14:1 and should give me 96,286,382 bpm. I expect a bit of slip with the V-Belt so if I lose 20% of my bpm I won't be too disappointed.




96,286,382 blows per minute!!! Good luck finding belts that`ll handle that.
All I can say is good luck,hang on tight and go heavy on the PPE! :o
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LMAO - okay, let me rephrase that...


My 1/4hp motor came from a large standing fan and has 3 speetings: 300 OR 900 OR 1200 rpm.

I have a 3.5" pulley on the motor and plan on using an 11" pulley for the crank. This gives me a circumference ratio of 3.14:1 and should give me 96 OR 286 OR 382 bpm. I expect a bit of slip with the V-Belt so if I lose 20% of my bpm I won't be too disappointed

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So I had a moment today where it seemed that the light bulb above my head actually turned on for a few seconds...

My idea here is a tiny power hammer that will reside on my workbench. Why not build it into my workbench???? The workbench is made of pressure treated 2x6's from my old deck... The thing is pretty darn stout. So, I will weld my "anvil" chunk of steel to a steel plate and bolt it to the table top; mount the pulley/crank and the motor to the frame, then use a wooden post as the main support for the leaf spring! I have a feeling that this little baby will be working before the weekend is over!

なるほど!

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