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Carl Richardson

Casting the knife

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What do you guys think of using the lost wax casting method to make the general blade for my first knife and I can just grind it down and polish it up? I found a company near me in PA that does lost wax and wanted to know what you think http://www.ppcpinc.com/lost_wax_casting.html Also how is damascus design done on blades? it looks awesome!


If you're trying to make a Bronze Age knife, casting would be a good way to go about it. A steel blade, not so much.

Search the archives here -- or the Net generally -- for tutorials on pattern welding. That'll answer your question about "damascus." (The scare quotes aren't intended to be insulting; I just don't like to use the term Damascus for pattern welding, because I have an idea what real Damascus steel was -- and it wasn't pattern welded. I understand that you probably don't know the difference. That's OK.)

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would not use casting to make a knife. the reason involves the difference that the grain structure between a cast steel and a forged steel cast will generally break easyier .what they call damascus today is pattern welded steel and there are books written about it . in a nutshell its 2 different steels welded together then manipulated . after grinding they are etched to show the differences between the 2 steels .if you are looking to start makeing knives there are companys that make blade blanks in a variety of sizes and styles .good luck!

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There is at least one maker that makes cast blades and knives. Google Boye dendritic knives if you woould like more info.

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Yeah, but those aren't steel. They're mainly cobalt and chromium, with a bunch of other alloying elements. Iron is a small fraction of the composition. Not even close to a project for a first-timer.

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go with Matt - he knows what he is writing. either forge or just get a bar of steel and grind away the parts that don't look like a knife. or, cast bronze and hammer the edges to make them hard. that would be a heck of a project, and really beautiful.
kc

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Boye was originally casting those in D-2, and they got pretty favorable reviews, though heat treating D-2 isn't for the novice. Probably best to stick with simple alloys and grind or forge the first few.

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Boye was originally casting those in D-2, and they got pretty favorable reviews, though heat treating D-2 isn't for the novice. Probably best to stick with simple alloys and grind or forge the first few.


Casting D2 wouldn't exactly be for the novice, either! I'm not sure I even understand what the point would be.

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As I recall he was trying to find a way to produce inexpensive copies of forged blades- complete with hammer marks and on some, file teeth. D-2 was necessary to compensate for loosing strength in the casting process. There was a company casting blades in 1045 too, but I don't even forge blades out of steel that cheap!(I think they were located in India)

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