Luke March

Show me your Stake Plates!

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So, I picked these up today for $150.... now I need to find a way to mount this.

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(pic is clickable)


I would love to see how those of you with stake plates have gone about mounting them.


And as a side thought, do you think these were worth paying $150 for?


LM

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looks like you got yourself a good deal there, i made a stake plate from a railroad track plate because of the expense, it works but it isnt a long enough "sleeve" for the stake to jamm into so it wobbles a bit. but some square tubing forged to a slight taper, and welded to the bottom would solve that. btw the stake i made too them things are expensive round here!

Ed Steinkirchner

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Great value for the money! I don't have a stake plate, yet... but I think it would be best to mount it on a hefty chunk of wood or heavy metal stand. I like portability so I wouldn't mount it to my workbench or welding table, but that's just my two Canadian cents worth.

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Wow, I thought I was getting a decent deal, but I didn't know it was that good!


Steeler - I like portability too. Especially in my small shop, where it will need to be portable so it will be out of the way when I'm not using it.

I'm thinking I'll build a stand out of 4x4's, maybe adding enough extra wood on one side to have some hollowed out areas for dishing.


Come on, out of all the people here, doesn't anyone have a stake plate they can take pictures of?

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One hundred fifty dollars! You pay that much for the blow horn stake in fair condition not to mention all that other stuff. You got a good deal on all of those stakes and stake plate, count yourself a fortunate man. Nice job on the stand and I like the depressions over to one side for doing some sinking. B)

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Hu.... I have two Bally stake plates... they are mounted in a factory table..

Yours is the only other Bally I have ever seen..

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All my stakes are down on the shelves below...

I also have a pexto but dont have it set up for use..

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I found a PEXTO stake plate at the local scrapyard Saturday, 8" x 30", in *mint* condition---no damage whatsoever. Bought it and the rest of my finds for US$10 total!

I'll have to see about getting a picture taken of it. Better deal than my last stake plate that did have a couple of damaged holes that I was happy to pay $25 for...

Now to kick the big anvils out into the smithing shop and free up the *old* RR bridge timber baulk I pulled out of a flooding stream once---makes a nice stand as it's about 8' long and just the right height for my large anvils or stakes with some stem length---with two plates I'll mount one cut in flush with the top of the baulk and I'll mount the other about 6" higher with some heavy lumber I can cut and mount to the baulk---for the two level effect!

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I had stakes before I had a plate, so I built a wooden plate, then just recently I came across 3 plates, 2 of which I will be selling to some needy smith, The big one came from a friend, he told me I had to keep it, so the two smaller ones are for sale. I keep one stake in a stump right next to my forge for quick small forgewelding jobs that might cool off if I move to the anvil!

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In my old shop, my Pexto plate was mounted in a low table that was made out of heavy wood planking. This put the top of the stakes just above waist height (sheet metal work). Last fall, I had a friend of mine cut me out a plate with his water jet. We made it 12" x 24" and used 3/4 plate. I had him put 3/4", 1", and 1.25" square holes in it. They aren't tapered for my stakes, but I use it with my hardy tools, scroll jigs, etc. Works really well, plus he did it for free! I made up a few stakes to work with it, because I don't use my Pexto stakes for hot work. They are polished up for copper and brass.

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A little while ago my father picked up this stake plate with a table for me, knowing it had something to do with metalwork. Haven't found much out about BARTH but It is almost identical to some of the Pexto plates that I have seen here. I don't do much sheet metal work so I might have to find a different suitable use for it or maybe just use it as a tong and hammer rack.

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Besides armour work they can come in handy for a lot of ornamental stuff,  My main use of my big Bickern stake is making bracelets...

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Yeah I want to mount that stake that is under the table in the pictures in its own stump. I think it would be good for some smaller work

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Any chance you could take a few pix from different angles of the bare table without the plate? The mounting tables are far rarer than the plates themselves.

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I was in an abandoned building recently and came across a worn out old work bench, it made it home with me and I ripped the top boards off and mated my stake plate to it, and it seems to work just fine, during the move my stakes got rusted up, and now I have a bit of a job ahead of me to clean them back up, but they are at long last in place and available for use.

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Here's mine. Unknown manufacture on the plate. Made the stand myself with removable legs so I can haul it to events.post-35726-0-28679500-1387578709_thumb.j

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John, I will get some more pictures of the mounting table but from what I can tell it looks like it was handmade by the previous owner, did a good job but it doesn't have a from the factory feel or look to it. I will try to investigate further.

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A very BIG NO NO NO!  Stakes are generally designed for relatively light work with sheet metal and have TAPERED bases.

 

Hardies are designed to have the forces applied to the face of the anvil and so have sq shafts that are NOT tapered.

 

It is possible to stick a tapered stake base in your hardy hole and then use it for heavy forging resulting in the heel of your anvil getting broken off.  We generally consider this to be a bad bad thing indeed!

 

If you look at a stake plate you will notice that the sq holes are tapered---unlike hardy holes.

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Mine is more on the sheet metal side with it having the hollow double seam and small plate at end. When I had the pexto plate it was mounted in a steel table where the hand forming machines were mounted.

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Welcome aboard James, glad to have you. If you'll put your general location in the header you might be surprised how many of the Iforge gang live within visiting distance.

Nice stake (plate?) or is it a bench or? Nice pic, we LOVE pics, more please. I have a number of tin knocker's tools and have to use a leg vise to work with the stakes, a stake plate would be a nice addition. I just don't use them enough to try to acquire a stake plate. I DO keep my eyes open for a serious steal of a deal though. ;) Now if a spinning lathe and circle shear became available I might have to do some begging with Deb. 

What kind of sheet metal work do you do? 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Frosty, Thanks.

. I did HVAC and architectural. Love working with Copper. I am from Central Illinois and dab in buying and selling equipment mostly on the sheet metal side of this. I have an old Niagara 60" open throat stomp shear 24" depth that is neat but so heavy and takes up so much space it has been in inventory for a long time. The table I showed here is nice because it is easy to move around and you can put redheads in concrete and bolt it down, remove bolts and bring it in and out as you need it. When bolted down you can slide the hollow double seam stake out and use it. The nice part of that is it is half round and has the rivet or anvil at the end of it, then the plate at the back stays stationary for your forming stakes. Again thanks for the welcome.

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Serious second on having better pictures from several angles! Always looking for documentation of tools by those who know how to use them.

This ain't no Cracker Barrel! We use this stuff.

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