FieryFurnace

bees wax application

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One thing not mentioned in the original answers is that the triangle may have been hung with leather the cure in the leather likely contributed to the rust.

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Back in 1986 we had a small smithy. My partner Pete had some experience me, not so much, was great fun. We met many smiths/tourists. someone said to try acrylic liquid floor polish on a cotton towel at black heat. Worked great except for fumes ,a nice flat black , non transferring  finish .

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Now you bring up Bees wax attracting bees, Arkie, I recall it being discussed before. That's a good tidbit of info to know. when I forge flowers I'll use bees wax and be able to pitch them being real enough to fool bees.

 

Is that a marketing line or what? <grin>

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Good idea! Spectators think we work magic anyway.... :rolleyes:



By "wax ring" do you mean toilet rings? If so they're no longer almost pure bees wax, they're parafin and silicon now and not very suitable for finishing.

Frosty the Lucky.


Frosty, I had posed a question back in July regarding the presence or absence of beeswax in toilet bowl rings after seeing an old post of yours back in 2010.

I recently contacted a major manufacturer of toilet bowl rings and inquired about the composition of their rings. Bear in mind this is just one mfg., but probably many others are similar. Looks like no beeswax in their bowl rings. This is the reply I received:

"I’m sorry but our wax seals are a synthetic product and the majority of the materials used in the manufacturing process is petroleum based."

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Frosty, I had posed a question back in July regarding the presence or absence of beeswax in toilet bowl rings after seeing an old post of yours back in 2010.

 

I recently contacted a major manufacturer of toilet bowl rings and inquired about the composition of their rings.  Bear in mind this is just one mfg., but probably many others are similar.  Looks like no beeswax in their bowl rings.  This is the reply I received:

 

"I’m sorry but our wax seals are a synthetic product and the majority of the materials used in the manufacturing process is petroleum based."

 

Yeah, none anymore doesn't surprise me. When built the house we got to put the toilets in about 16 years ago and the rings didn't have bees wax at all. I may have to open one next time I'm at the plumbing store and see what they're like now.

 

Guess it's a good thing I don't use bees wax on iron unless it's requested by the customer.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Well, I just tossed my wax ring in the plumbing parts box in the shop.  No need to try to use it for steel coatings.  Will save it for the next leaky toilet (hope that is a LLLOOONNNGGGG time!

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ive used crisco  veg oil, the kind in the can thats all white and hard, not good for cooking as far as im concerned, but it doesnt work to bad...leaves a good black finish, i also coat all my cast iron pans with it.....never use it for cooking that stuff will kill ya............... 

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Neat to see this old thread revived. I was still smithing on a homemade portable shop trailer, under the trees in the front yard with nothing more than an anvil, blower, homemade forge, and small post-vise. Back then I had a grand total of two hammers and about three pairs of tongs. It's nice to remember those days, but thank GOD they are over! :) I don't miss frozen blowers, snow on anvil faces, etc, etc.

 

I have not used bees-wax or any mixture containing bees-wax, for a couple years now. I use linseed oil extensively. In my opinion it provides a better finish, when applied correctly, and is not tacky like bees-wax mixtures tend to be. I've been using it two ways. Applied cold, allowed to set, and then the excess is wiped off with a rag. Applied cold and then backed for 10-30 minutes at 200 degrees in an oven, the excess being wiped off while the product is hot. Both methods work very well.

 

I also use Krylon clear coat from walmart on a few items, but mostly I've switched over to clear, flat, powder coat.

 

For those of you using bees-wax mixtures or any oil mixtures, the best applicator I've EVER used, is an old Kevlar, heat-resistant glove. They cost a couple dollars from Airgas or another welder supply store, they are heat-resistant so they don't burn up when applied to moderately hot product, and you were just going to throw the one with holes in it away, anyway.

 

I made a steel handle and wrapped the steel around the wadded up glove. Works like a charm!

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