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Sorry, I've been absent for a couple weeks. I've been working on a pair of gates for a client, which I agreed to have completed for his 60th birthday party (mar 27). All cor-ten steel (A588) angle and plate. I've included photos of the largest of the two (it is nearly complete). Not much forging here, but there are a few hot-set rivets and some hydraulic cold-forming. ;)

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I'm liking what I see ... a lot! Had me going there for a minute, thought your workshop was pretty well equiped if you had a waterjet cutter in it

Even Sam Yellen didn't call himself a blacksmith, all of his cards and advertizing said "Sam Yellen, Metal Worker"!

Nice stuff, thanks for sharing. Some people use the term "blacksmith" to limit themselves. That's OK, we each can choose. It's just when they want to impose their limitations on me that I take umbrage.

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Even Sam Yellen didn't call himself a blacksmith, all of his cards and advertizing said "Sam Yellen, Metal Worker"!

Nice stuff, thanks for sharing. Some people use the term "blacksmith" to limit themselves. That's OK, we each can choose. It's just when they want to impose their limitations on me that I take umbrage.


haha working with wood is also good, I like it

you really have to be one with the wood though look at it and know what its for

that gate is great though it might techincally be "sheet metal work"
Did you use a Large pittsburg type machine to turn the edges on the radiused pieces? or roll them by hand on a rotary machine?
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haha working with wood is also good, I like it

you really have to be one with the wood though look at it and know what its for

that gate is great though it might techincally be "sheet metal work"
Did you use a Large pittsburg type machine to turn the edges on the radiused pieces? or roll them by hand on a rotary machine?


whoops I see that is the thickness of the material not a break
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Even Sam Yellen didn't call himself a blacksmith, all of his cards and advertizing said "Sam Yellen, Metal Worker"!

Nice stuff, thanks for sharing. Some people use the term "blacksmith" to limit themselves. That's OK, we each can choose. It's just when they want to impose their limitations on me that I take umbrage.


Far more who use the term welder or fabricator limit themselves. I love those gates.
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Even Sam Yellen didn't call himself a blacksmith, all of his cards and advertizing said "Sam Yellen, Metal Worker"!

Nice stuff, thanks for sharing. Some people use the term "blacksmith" to limit themselves. That's OK, we each can choose. It's just when they want to impose their limitations on me that I take umbrage.


Thanks Grant. I don't make any apologies for not forging and I agree with you- call it what you will, it's all just working with metal to me. I appreciate the design process and welcome the opportunity to solve problems. I use what I have, I outsource when it makes sense, and I learn all that I can to get things done. I love to make things, and in some ironic twist, people pay me to do this. ;)
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Thanks Grant. I don't make any apologies for not forging and I agree with you- call it what you will, it's all just working with metal to me. I appreciate the design process and welcome the opportunity to solve problems. I use what I have, I outsource when it makes sense, and I learn all that I can to get things done. I love to make things, and in some ironic twist, people pay me to do this. ;)

Looks like you do just fine with the forging as well. that's quite the press brake how many ton?
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Nice one David.

I'm always a fan of gates that aren't just a frame round the outside and some "infill" on the inside. I'm never too keen about people banging on being a "blacksmith" either. Its all about using the appropriate technique for your design, be that laser cutting, spinning, turning, CNC maching,forging .....whatever. If you're at the creative end of the spectrum it's all about the appropriate technique that looks right, not purist dogma.

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Looks like you do just fine with the forging as well. that's quite the press brake how many ton?


Southshore, that press brake is a 200-ton machine. I sure wish I had that bad boy at my shop. The guys at that forming outfit have been great in helping me out when I needed extra oomph. My tendency is to always design to the limits of my own capabilities. Keeps me on my toes!
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that gate is great though it might techincally be "sheet metal work"
Did you use a Large pittsburg type machine to turn the edges on the radiused pieces? or roll them by hand on a rotary machine?


Bryce,
I got a chuckle out of this before I read your second post. I'm thinking to myself- if this guy thinks this is a sheet metal job, I'm scared to think what he considers to be heavy plate! :D FYI, the frame is 3/8" x 2 x 2 angle with one leg cut off. The panels are all 1/4" plate. The whole mess weighs several hundred lbs.

DB
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Bryce,
I got a chuckle out of this before I read your second post. I'm thinking to myself- if this guy thinks this is a sheet metal job, I'm scared to think what he considers to be heavy plate! :D FYI, the frame is 3/8" x 2 x 2 angle with one leg cut off. The panels are all 1/4" plate. The whole mess weighs several hundred lbs.

DB


how did you cut the one leg off? with a bandsaw? I havent seen a shear that would clear that past the buttons unless it had a groove you could snap it into with one leg down
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Cool piece David,

You making some interesting latch and hinge system?

Cant quite visualize how the skeletal angle works on the back? Must have a very different look than the front?


Thank you for everyone's comments and interest. I appreciate the feedback.

Michael, I'm glad you said skeletal. Perfect. I should explain a bit more...the back of the gate does look very different than the front, by design. The entire gate while maintaining an overall organic/industrial feel, was meant to look a bit reptilian (scales) from the front, while showing off the structure from the rear. Skin on the front, bones in the back, if you will. The reason I cut the leg off the angle on the frame was to make it look, well...a little less like plain old angle, and a little more like a skeleton. The gate hinges on pins at the top and bottom of the fixed side panel (bronze bushings).

I'm working out a very simple latch system that uses an offset round counterweight that pushes a sliding bolt that will go "klunk" when it's opened, and "klunk" when it's locked (think eccentric on a mechanical power hammer). I'll get you a picture when I get it worked out.

Cor-ten was chosen for this project as the gate will be allowed to rust naturally. Prior to installation, I'm planning to have the entire piece pickled in an acid bath to remove all the mill scale to help speed up the rusting process. The gates are in close proximity to the ocean, so it shouldn't take long to get a nice deep brown rusty patina on everything.

Here's a peek under the hood (view from the back)...
-DB
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I am really looking forward to the finished and installed pics of this one.
Between your gate and the one posted by Michael you guys are setting the bar for gates on this side of the world.
I hear there`s a reprobate on the other side that does pretty well for himself too. ;)

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Very cool, looks like a different gate from the back. My recent gate had the same effect with the use of the plate. Would have like to see you forge the skeleton part though, budget constant or other factors that led you to use the angle?


As much as I like to forge, I actually never saw this project as a forging job. Although the front and back are different, they still need to relate to each other. I specifically wanted to use heavy angle because: 1) It gave me a nice 2" wide flat surface to hang the panels from (and hide some welds behind). 2) Even with one leg cut short, it still has plenty of strength in three dimensions 3) With the leg cut off, it looks unique and skeletal, but still has the industrial feel of a traditional structural, which to me seemed consistent with the overall vision.

Also, this was always intended to be a naturally rusted piece hence the cor-ten. It would seem a shame to put effort into forging, only to have it covered over with heavy rust...
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David-
Outstanding design and work! I hope you share pictures of it installed to gain context with the site.

I have to disagree about rusted forgings- Ever been to the ghost town of Bodie, Ca.? Some of the best rusted Iron I've ever seen!

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David-
Outstanding design and work! I hope you share pictures of it installed to gain context with the site.

I have to disagree about rusted forgings- Ever been to the ghost town of Bodie, Ca.? Some of the best rusted Iron I've ever seen!



Thanks Fe-wood. Point taken- I have been to Bodie... :)
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Thanks David,

A traditional industrial structure, I like it, nice juxtaposition. Its a beautiful gate.


"Traditional industrial" I like it. ;)

Now I've got some additional work to do on the smaller gate. Sorry, no photos yet...It is mounted on a free-standing post that I am unable to tie into the wall. The small gate is pretty heavy as well. When we mounted it in the shop the post deflected 3/8" from the weight of the gate. The post was 2 x 2 x 1/4 (I tried to get away with what I had in the rack). I'm going to go with 3 x 3 x3/8" and I'm thinking about either using a gusset made out of the leg-less angle as a stiffener...or welding the post to the floor mounting plate with some built in deflection to compensate....
-DB
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