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Mike_wit

Treating cold rolled steel to look forged

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Hi IFI members. I have a question regarding surface finish for CRS. I've had a fan screen for the fire place cut out of CRS. (The design was borrowed from a Frank Lloyd Wright stain glass window.) I wanted the finish to match the fireplace implements that have a forged look. I guess I could always paint it gray but wanted to know if there are better options.

regards,

Mike

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Hot oil finish, heat and apply. You can use Crisco in the kitchen oven like seasoning cast iron. You can also heat out doors and use linseed oil or veg oil at a black heat.

Not sure if that is what you are looking for.

Above advice is quite reasonable too.

Phil

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the info on this thread might be helpful. I posted what I use on it and if applied at a good heat the piece has that "Blacksmith finish"as my wife calls it.

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You can only make something look forged by forging it; that is significantly changing the shape of hot metal under pressure. Your bit of plate does not look forged because it isn't a shape that can be forged (at least not from one piece by a man with a hammer. A design like that needs to be as clean-cut as possible.
The looped bit of metal to the right also looks very much like cold-formed steel to me. Hitting a lump of cold steel with a hammer will produce only a hammered (dented) finish, it will never make it look forged.

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You can only make something look forged by forging it; that is significantly changing the shape of hot metal under pressure. Your bit of plate does not look forged because it isn't a shape that can be forged (at least not from one piece by a man with a hammer. A design like that needs to be as clean-cut as possible.
The looped bit of metal to the right also looks very much like cold-formed steel to me. Hitting a lump of cold steel with a hammer will produce only a hammered (dented) finish, it will never make it look forged.


Gotta agree with Sam here. The new thing in fabrication is to use all these 1000 axis waterjet/cnc special cutters with a bunch of robotic arms and then they wonder why the end result looks so overly machined and unnatural. Geee I wonder!! If something is to look handmade or forged then it should be. I recommend not trying to make something look in a way that it is not. You'll only fool the people who really have absolutely no clue between the difference. I would recommend just leaving that part as is rather then trying to make it appear as if it was created in a style that it was not.

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He pm'd me after trying the crisco. He was unhappy with the appearance. He said that an oxidized finish was desired. He is trying to match the tool handle in the photo.

I clarified the hot oil finish (including Crisco) but don't know how to get him where he wants to go.

Phil

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C'mon guys, you're losing track here. He just wants to match the "finish". Paint!


90% or more of my tools that I sell have a black Rustoleum hammered-brand paint finish. It's expensive spray paint at about 7$ a can, but never did anyone look at that and say "that looks forged" :lol:

If he doesn't like that oil finish the only other thing I can think of is a ferrous patina. www.ssschemical.com is where I get my patina. That will match the color if it's just a color issue. It will also look somewhat natural as patina, no matter how well it's applied isn't totally uniform.

here i'll attach a patina item or two and see if that's what he's going for. (notice there is no texture change, just looks).

The last picture "Fork01.jpg" is what a hammered paint finish looks like. It's not terribly impressive, especially on ornate or decorative items. On tools it just gives a bit of texture and looks better then normal flat or gloss rattlecan. I would never paint something "artistic" with hammered spray paint. :unsure: I think you would really be going the wrong direction with that. After you apply the hammered spray paint you'll lose all the appearance of metal. Which will make you wonder why you didn't have it made in wood or plastic. Devil knows i've been there. lol

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Naked Anvil,
You are right, even though it is not necessary in the kitchen. So a bit of controlled rusting to get a base for the oil? Maybe a dip in vinegar overnight, then remove and let rust a few hours before washing with baking soda/water? THEN a hot oil finish?

I've never tried that involved of a process. I just wipe on Crisco and call it good as it cools, or throw the pieces in the oven while cooking dinner.

Phil

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How about heating the whole thing in a wood fire, leting the surface scale up? Might even work better if you do this several times, removing some scale in between firings, to allow the surface to sort of randomly oxidize. Then apply an oil finish, or paint (thin).

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I have seen people heat up a piece of sheet metal (they were going to do some chisel work on) a total of three times to get a good scaled up surface look. They would heat it up and bend it slightly each time to make the scale pop off...wire brush it with a hand brush...let it cool...then do it again. The results really surprised me on how well it did. Now this may have been for hot roll to reduce the mill scale. I do not remember. But I would think that the process would have a similar outcome in your case even if you did not bend it but go it up to heat and then brushed it. Then you can clear it or wax, or whatever....

Might work...Good luck.

Beautiful by the way. Wright's work is something to admire. I have a book somewhere of his finished work and sketches. This makes me want to dig that thing out.

Peyton

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Just a thought.

What was the finish used on the handle shown that is the sample in question?

There appears to be some heat discolouration on the plate, so my approach would be to remove this discolouration to give it the same appearance all over, then finish as the sample.

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90% or more of my tools that I sell have a black Rustoleum hammered-brand paint finish. It's expensive spray paint at about 7$ a can, but never did anyone look at that and say "that looks forged" :lol:

If he doesn't like that oil finish the only other thing I can think of is a ferrous patina. www.ssschemical.com is where I get my patina. That will match the color if it's just a color issue. It will also look somewhat natural as patina, no matter how well it's applied isn't totally uniform.

here i'll attach a patina item or two and see if that's what he's going for. (notice there is no texture change, just looks).

The last picture "Fork01.jpg" is what a hammered paint finish looks like. It's not terribly impressive, especially on ornate or decorative items. On tools it just gives a bit of texture and looks better then normal flat or gloss rattlecan. I would never paint something "artistic" with hammered spray paint. :unsure: I think you would really be going the wrong direction with that. After you apply the hammered spray paint you'll lose all the appearance of metal. Which will make you wonder why you didn't have it made in wood or plastic. Devil knows i've been there. lol

Avadon buy the hammered paint in quarts waaay cheaper.
Ken

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C'mon guys, you're losing track here. He just wants to match the "finish". Paint!


I assumed that when he asked for a 'forged look' that he wanted the item to look forged.

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My suggestion about the wood fire:
There's a problem with this. The piece will warp, due to uneaven initial heating. I can't think of any way to prevent this other than straightening afterwards.


Be warned!

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Sam
He actually said: "I wanted the finish to match the fireplace implements that have a forged look." I think this all still may be on topic. Maybe not...

My .02
Peyton

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And here I was thinking a nice linseed oil finish might match the color of the handle just fine. A nice smoky coal fire, heat the metal over the fire until too hot to hold but not hot enough to change color, apply linseed oil until it s starts smoking, add more until it stops smoking, about three coats and it should be a nice forged steel black color. This does not involve actually forging the cutout piece at all, just adding smoke and oil to the surface. Perhaps this is the finish he is desirous of, this is not a food safe finish, linseed oil and coal tar are toxic.

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Sam
He actually said: "I wanted the finish to match the fireplace implements that have a forged look." I think this all still may be on topic. Maybe not...


I don't think that it matters really... he doesn't seem to have been back to read the answers anyway!

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