Alec.S

Show me your shop!

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If this works, here's some pics of my shed, The shed, benches and forge were built out of stuff that I found in skips. I paid £50 for the anvil and the vice and tools were left over from when I was full time. The top of the bench with the vice is 1 1/2'' of oak and 1/4'' thick plate and the legs are concreted 18'' into the ground.

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That worked Sam, thanks: That looks like a good usable space to me. I'd probably feel right at home working there.

I'm wondering if the tool on the far end of the bench from the vise is actually a pipe vise like it looks to me, or if you modified a pipe vise or it's a tool known to everybody but me. There appear to be a couple things about it you don't see on pipe vises is why I'm wondering. Of course why I'm wondering is if it's something special I don't know what it does and being as lazy as I naturally am would hate to miss out of something that makes life easier. ;)

Frosty the Lucky.

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Oh no,no,no, that isn't "copying"! It's adapting. Not a thing wrong with adapting another's idea to something for yourself. . . Well, not usually. I don't think Lorelei's gonna come kick your Butt for drawing a face on the forge hood! Oh WAIT! (A rare moment of sanity :unsure: strikes Frosty) If she DOES come kick your butt you'd better post pics or I'm going to gather a few of the IFI gang and we're ALL coming down and kick your butt!

Frosty the Lucky.



Frosty, I would consider it a great honour if all these people came all the the way to Australia just to kick my butt :lol:

Cheers

Ian

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That worked Sam, thanks: That looks like a good usable space to me. I'd probably feel right at home working there.

I'm wondering if the tool on the far end of the bench from the vise is actually a pipe vise like it looks to me, or if you modified a pipe vise or it's a tool known to everybody but me. There appear to be a couple things about it you don't see on pipe vises is why I'm wondering. Of course why I'm wondering is if it's something special I don't know what it does and being as lazy as I naturally am would hate to miss out of something that makes life easier. ;)

Frosty the Lucky.


It's a small screw press that I've had for years, I cleaned it up and bolted it down to put crank bearings into a small engine and I've had no reason to move it yet. As soon as I do I will need it for something.

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Frosty, I would consider it a great honour if all these people came all the the way to Australia just to kick my butt :lol:

Cheers

Ian


I'm pretty sure we'd be wearing clown shoes and catch you in public. :o Then of course being blacksmiths we'd impose on you for feed and beer till your wife finished your but kicking for us. Oh :unsure: okay, I'm sure she'd get around to you AFTER kicking OUR butts. . . Still it's tempting anyway. :rolleyes:

Frosty the Lucky.

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It's a small screw press that I've had for years, I cleaned it up and bolted it down to put crank bearings into a small engine and I've had no reason to move it yet. As soon as I do I will need it for something.


Ah HAH! That explains the flat plate where the bottom jaw would be on a pipe vise. That's a sweet size for a screw press. I'd give it it's own spot on the bench myself. I NEVER get rid of a tool for the very same reason, as soon as it's gone I'll NEED it.

Is there a brand name on the screw vise so I can keep my eyes open for one?

Thanks,
Frosty the Lucky.

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Is there a brand name on the screw vise so I can keep my eyes open for one?

Thanks,
Frosty the Lucky.


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There's no brand name on it, just the numbers 07-1?39-9-0? cast into one of the legs. It's cast from Al with a steel insert for the thread and about 6'' of travel. I've got no idea what it was originally for. I frequently find myself about to use it for something and then finding a better tool for the job.

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post-4999-12679825074802_thumb.jpg

There's no brand name on it, just the numbers 07-1?39-9-0? cast into one of the legs. It's cast from Al with a steel insert for the thread and about 6'' of travel. I've got no idea what it was originally for. I frequently find myself about to use it for something and then finding a better tool for the job.


Thanks Sam, I'll just keep my eyes open for the general tool. There certainly isn't much clue to what it was originally intended for from it's looks is there? On the up side I dont think it'd be too tificult to make were I to suddenly find something that just has to have one to make. Just one last question than I'll give you some peace. Is it an Acme thread or a regular 60* (bolt) thread?

Frosty the Lucky.

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It's 1'' OD with a fairly fine thread that I don't recognise (although I'm afraid I didn't try very hard).

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The numbers read more like a part no than a model no; could it be a service tool for a specific machine?

Happy hunting!

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It's 1'' OD with a fairly fine thread that I don't recognise (although I'm afraid I didn't try very hard).

post-4999-12681594656144_thumb.jpg post-4999-12681594796925_thumb.jpg

The numbers read more like a part no than a model no; could it be a service tool for a specific machine?

Happy hunting!


Those look like an Acme thread or similar. Acme threads are cut to take a lot of force but not jam where regular bolt type threads are intended to "jam" so they don't come lose. "Jam" isn't the correct word but as a bolt is tightened it stretches changing the threads slightly which helps keep it from coming lose.

You could be right about it's being a specialty tool though I can think of a lot of things it'd be good for in a mechanic's shop. Pressing bearings, bushings, etc. come to mind right off the top.

Thanks Sam, I'll let you know if I find one and even better yet, find out what it's supposed to be for.

Frosty the Lucky.

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Will here is my new shop it's small and it's tight with a half finished floor but it's mine all mine.
BillP

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I count three power hammers at least. I'm thinking you're pretty well equipped or badly spoiled. Lucky dog either way!

Looks like a darned nice shop to me that is.
Frosty the Lucky.

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Outside the shop: workbench and flypress.

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Installing the hammer:

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Outside before workbench/flypress was installed:

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Hammer and tools:

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Pictures of the interior of our shop


Forgemaster, to say that is a well equipped shop would be a gross understatement. Wow. Thanks for the photos. Now, I need to get back to work to make more money to buy more tools...
-DB

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I count three power hammers at least. I'm thinking you're pretty well equipped or badly spoiled. Lucky dog either way!

Looks like a darned nice shop to me that is.
Frosty the Lucky.


Hey Frosty

good that you're are up and about again.
Thats actually 5 hammers inside the shop 1cwt massey, 2cwt alldays, Davis and primrose steam hammer which I think is 3 or 4 cwt, 5 cwt massey, perry tagging hammer,
then 80 ton horizontal press, 400 ton forging press,
Then we have another 5 hammers outside along with a high speed Davy C frame forging press, (these arent used, we ran out of shop space and power supply)

We hope to be able to move this year (fingers crossed, local council here not at all geared to industry) into new purpose built factory, then I can install some more stuff.

Phil

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Our Nazel 2B
300 Pound Bradley Upright Helve we sold to a freind
Customers Nazel 3B before rebuild
Nazel 3B after rebuild delivered to customers’ facility
Compressor Piston from a Nazel 3B
Our 100 Pound Bradley Compact
2006 113 Cubic Inch FLHT
1972 Camaro Z28 Dressed in 1937 Chevy Sedan Street Clothes

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Hey Frosty

good that you're are up and about again.
Thats actually 5 hammers inside the shop 1cwt massey, 2cwt alldays, Davis and primrose steam hammer which I think is 3 or 4 cwt, 5 cwt massey, perry tagging hammer,
then 80 ton horizontal press, 400 ton forging press,
Then we have another 5 hammers outside along with a high speed Davy C frame forging press, (these arent used, we ran out of shop space and power supply)

We hope to be able to move this year (fingers crossed, local council here not at all geared to industry) into new purpose built factory, then I can install some more stuff.

Phil


Thanks Phil it's good to be getting back, though I see I have a way to go on counting.

Seriously dude, I feel pretty lucky to have found a 50# Little Giant close enough it didn't break the bank getting it. Now I'm suffering severe power hammer envy! :o

Frosty the Lucky.

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