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Nazel 4N for sale in Washinton $6000


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I think he means operating out side the laws of physics.

Look what just arrived Home in Long Beach! Will post better pic's later.....

Home Sweet Home... Thanks to Larry and his helper and Bob B. and all that helped get it here.... She is Sweet! Foot lever is Jacked and I need to find or make a new Hand lever with the

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you Americans and your quaint use of language. Is "outlaw style" the same as arrogant?



Your first post and that's what you say? good one :rolleyes: (sarcasm)

Jesse, you got style man! Some things you gotta learn by doing instead, and like others said you spoke to Bob and he knows what's what.
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I have enjoyed reading this .
I have an alldays and onions 3 hundred weight (336lb) sitting in my yard ,its been here 2 years now .
looks similar in size /weight to the nazel (we guessed at 8000 to 8500kg all in about 2500 in the anvil)
I got it on ebay for £175 (sorry.)
I have stripped it down , its in good condition but have been dredding the cost/time involved in installing it .
This thread has given me good food for thought . There are some knowledgeable people here .


Thanks

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I have enjoyed reading this .
I have an alldays and onions 3 hundred weight (336lb) sitting in my yard ,its been here 2 years now .
looks similar in size /weight to the nazel (we guessed at 8000 to 8500kg all in about 2500 in the anvil)
I got it on ebay for £175 (sorry.)
I have stripped it down , its in good condition but have been dredding the cost/time involved in installing it .
This thread has given me good food for thought . There are some knowledgeable people here .


Thanks


hey basher (love the name mate!) Ive come up with quite a nifty design for a 'shallow pit' foundation for my 2cwt Massey thats a bit of a compromise. The hammer will be boosted up from ground level about 8" on old sleepers (which address the low bottom tool height issue for me), and have about 2' of concrete under the base of the anvil block. Not perfect but should work nicely! when I get the drawings finalised Ill mail em to you :D

I think your a bit over on your weights, the block on your hammer (assuming 10x Nominal falling weight) should be 1.5 tons + / - a bit, maybee 4 ton in the hammer?
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hey basher (love the name mate!) Ive come up with quite a nifty design for a 'shallow pit' foundation for my 2cwt Massey thats a bit of a compromise. The hammer will be boosted up from ground level about 8" on old sleepers (which address the low bottom tool height issue for me), and have about 2' of concrete under the base of the anvil block. Not perfect but should work nicely! when I get the drawings finalised Ill mail em to you :D

I think your a bit over on your weights, the block on your hammer (assuming 10x Nominal falling weight) should be 1.5 tons + / - a bit, maybee 4 ton in the hammer?


John,
I think you are rite , I just measured the anvil dimentions (in the dark !!) comes out to 1700kg . The weights were a guess from the Hiab lock outs ............
Mine is just a baby !!
I'll not be so scared of moving the anvil now . I have done quite a few 2500kg moves by hand .
Thanks
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Some manufacturers in the late 1800's and early 1900's used 8:1 anvil ratios. I had an 800 pound Erie "steam" hammer with that. Had a really nice "cushy" soft sorta blow, loved that hammer, my all-time favorite. Later hammers I had with "better" anvil ratios had a sharper "crack" to them, same thing with one-piece hammers.

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John,
I think you are rite , I just measured the anvil dimentions (in the dark !!) comes out to 1700kg . The weights were a guess from the Hiab lock outs ............
Mine is just a baby !!
I'll not be so scared of moving the anvil now . I have done quite a few 2500kg moves by hand .
Thanks


Hi Basher. So, where are you planning to put it? Will it take over from your main hammer, or will it go in the lecture shed?
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Looks like a good tool you have there. I never used a hammer of the N series, but like my 3B very much.

I recommend Mark Krause's booklet as well as any other Nazel info you can get. Thought I had a spare copy of the booklet, but can't find it now.

Question:
Does anyone know of a 5B Nazel for sale..I guess a 5N would work as well after seeing this hammer and the videos by Grant on youtube.
I am casually looking.

Ric

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Looks like a good tool you have there. I never used a hammer of the N series, but like my 3B very much.

I recommend Mark Krause's booklet as well as any other Nazel info you can get. Thought I had a spare copy of the booklet, but can't find it now.

Question:
Does anyone know of a 5B Nazel for sale..I guess a 5N would work as well after seeing this hammer and the videos by Grant on youtube.
I am casually looking.

Ric



Wallace Metal Works has had one posted forever for $6500. Not sure, but its worth a call.
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I believe that add has been there many years...I seem to recall a few years back I spoke to the guy who bought that one.

Any others out there?

Ric


Just got an email from Jock Dempsey..that one is long gone and apparently there was another 5B with a dc motor which had sold as well.

Ric
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Sound like you have a successful way to move the hammer around. I simply rented a large forklift. The anvil weighs 5000 pounds on my 4 B and does have a hole which with I believe a 1 1/2" shaft makes moving the anvil around rather easy. So far the best mounting I have seen for the hammer is to do your pour with room and access ports on both sides of the anvil this allows you to change the timbers or material if it should compact over time. I saw this done on another hammer. The hammer weight is 12,000 pounds which is still pretty easy to move with a large forklift.

Cant wait to hear more on this project!

post-601-12672048336953_thumb.jpg

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Sound like you have a successful way to move the hammer around. I simply rented a large forklift. The anvil weighs 5000 pounds on my 4 B and does have a hole which with I believe a 1 1/2" shaft makes moving the anvil around rather easy. So far the best mounting I have seen for the hammer is to do your pour with room and access ports on both sides of the anvil this allows you to change the timbers or material if it should compact over time. I saw this done on another hammer. The hammer weight is 12,000 pounds which is still pretty easy to move with a large forklift.

Cant wait to hear more on this project!

That photo looks like a Yoder shot.
I moved my 3B into place with a hilift and chains. The trucker got a ticket for overage so I know mine weights in at 13,400 frame and anvil...rather heavy for a 3B.
The 3B anvil was simple with my small forkilft (now sold) as it was about 3,000-3,500 pounds.
For a larger hammer I would need to place it beside the shop on its own foundation and crane it in place over the anvil and then put the building extension around it. The local ship yard has out buildings with "I" beam roof and pick points so a crane can lift the roof off or the entire building for moving..not a bad way to go if one plans to live through another move. If I will die with it in place then moving it is someone else's problem ;-)

Never thought about extending the base for exchanging the wood. I used oak and it is well oiled now with dripping off the hammer and I put a steel band around it and plastic/tar beneath where it contacts the concrete so I do not think it will rot or go bad any time soon.

I looked at 4B Yoder had maybe 10 years ago now and it would not lift the tup when they turned it on..I passed on it. I see that have another listed, but no counterweight on the treadle and no dies and a bit steep on price.

A 4B may work well for me, but a 5B would be better I think in the long run...again big can hit light, but light can never hit big. Since I have a 3B I thought going two larger is better than one.
By self contained I mean not a utility hammer with external air..a two piece like the 3B I have or the "standard" larger frame over anvil is fine.

Ric
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