Sign in to follow this  
Guest Farrer82

UK Bottom Blast Forge Identification

Recommended Posts

Guest Farrer82

Hi guys and gals!
I've just picked up this bottom blast forge off ebay having been inspired by a local smith who showed me how to use a bottom blast. The photos were taken by the previous owner and used for selling the item on ebay, but I've fired it up today with my old hand cranked blower removed from my side-blast forge and the forge works an absolute treat. The intensity and size of the 'sweet spot' is massive in comparison to my side blast, and it's so much easier to manage the fire.

The question I wish to pose is that have any of you seen and identical firepot and forge grate/tuyere to the one on my forge? I know Vaughans here in the UK do one similar, but not quite the same, which got me thinking that it may have come from the USA or Canada, possibly even Europe. Can anyone shed any light or help me out with the identification??

19486.attach

19487.attach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was on the verge of buying that
i didn't though too pricey for me
Good luck, have fun
The photo looked alot different on ebay

Alec

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Farrer,
welcome to the site, have a visit to our website which may be of interest to you Blacksmiths Guild Home

Nice looking forge, I don't know who manufactured it, but it looks sound,

I have a question regarding the side view of the underside of the forge,
At the left hand side on top of the tue, there is a boss, is this used to secure the whole assembly supporting the weight at the rear by securing it to the base of the forge?

And does it come with a canopy?

Edited by John B
Canopy question added

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Farrer82
What fuel are you using that you can keep it lit with a hand cranked blower?


I'm using 'Sunbrite Singles' coke at present. The site of the coke appears to be comprised of 90% at 20 mm with the remainder of fines being good 'breeze'. I have broken the bigger stuff down before, but found it very laborious for very little return in terms of effieciency (In my inexperienced opinon). I start the fire with a 'nest ' of newspaper surrounded by charcoal. Once the charcoal is lit, I begin to heap up the coke around the burning charcoal, and begin cranking very slowly at first; approximately 1 revolution every 4 seconds or so, increasing to 1 revolution every 1 or 2 seconds until the coke is well lit, or my arm is tired!:P

The blower I'm using is a British Alcosa, I forget the model, I think its a 4007 or 4005 or something like that. It was supplied by Glendale Forge, who also constructed my old forge.

I was on the verge of buying that
i didn't though too pricey for me
Good luck, have fun
The photo looked alot different on ebay


I managed to get this one for a

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Farrer, I would imagine it is bolted on, the Vaughns and others are usually not as long on the inlet side as that, and if it wasn't secured it would tend to twist under its own weight when in use for long periods.

It does appear to be a fabricated assembly with a disposable grate, rather than a cast job like Vaughns and others, This is probably a good thing as it looks to have been well made and finished, and the Vaughns used to have a tendency to crack quite easily.

Whoever made it seems to have done a good job, and I think you got a bargain there.

You could easily adapt for an electric blower on it if you wished, you may need a slide valve or speeed controller if you do though. The sunbrite singles do have a tendency to need a constant supply of air or it dies quite quickly.

Good luck with it and happy forging.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to use a hand cranked forge. But got sick of constantly winding the handle for ages to get to hit a bit of red hot metal.
I had an old bathroom fan which I taped onto the air inlet on the hand crank blower. This gave a constant low level air blast that keptthe fire lit. Then when you put the work back in all of the effort of hand cranking went into heating the work not building the fire up again.
Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Farrer82

Cheers JohnB and Andrew. Due to the fact that my arm is getting shafted from the constant winding, I've purchased a Bouncy Castle blower off ebay for

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Farrer, What size outlet is there on the blower?

Personally I would go for making up a slide valve to fit to the forge tue flange, with a pipe welded to it that would then connect to a linking flexible pipe joining the blower and forge.

This could be the same size as the blower outlet, but I would go for something around 2" diameter for the air supply pipe

I have attached a couple of pics to give you a general idea of what I mean re the slide valve and tube connector

Axminster power tools make a reduction fitting that would probably suit the situation or you could easily make up one for yourself.

19585.attach

19586.attach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HI Farrer nice looking forge , I make my own bottom blast forges like John b.
I use 1 inch thick plate for the grate which is in daily use and has not burn't through in three years use and has not lossed any thickness , I control the air flow using a light dimmer switch I find there is no need for an air gate, but i know each forge has its own unique way of working.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Farrer82

Both brilliant ideas guys, very impressed with the ratchet slide valve, and also intrigued by the dimmer-switch scenario. I can't wait until the weekend when I'll have enough time to start tinkering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dimmer switch will not work on certain types of motors, and make sure if you are going to use one it is of adequate capacity, I use a 1kw one fitted in an extension that I can use for other applications also.

Personally I like a slide valve. If you drill a small hole to allow air through when the slide valve is shut, it will allow the coke to stay alight, you may need a 6mm or 8mm dia hole for this.

Play nice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this