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Buffalo Electric Blower

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I just got a Buffalo Electric Blower with motor control.
It looks to be in fair shape. The motor works and blowes good air, made noise, I oiled it but as usual it leaked right out. It did stop some of the noise. there was packing in the oil holes. It was all dried up. Got most of it out I think. Do I need to put some back?
My main problem is the wiring. Looks like something might be missing on the controller. I would post some pictures be can't get them to upload right now (new computer!!).
Not sure about model number. It has F-27594 as the number. Would this be the model number?
Dose anyone know where I might find some information.
Thanks
Billy

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I have a Buffalo blower with the fixed tap rheostat. The packing is there to weep oil down slowly when running since putting oil there without a wick simply dumps it out (as you noted). You can use most anything that will hold oil - cloth, cotton gauze, etc. Leave a bit of space under the oil cap so you can squirt some oil in and let it drain slowly thru the packing.

IIRC, the speed control breaks one side of the circuit so you put it in series on one hot leg. They are best used with a damper between the blower and pot as the lowest setting is too much for the average fire. For 90% of my fires, I set the blower at the lowest setting and use the damper to control the fire - so the blower might run for an hour while I go in and out of the fire and control the burn rate with the damper.

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Thank You
You answered everything I needed to know.
The more I have run the fan with oil the quieter to gets.It must have been dry for a long time.
HWooldridge, thanks
Billy

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Just for safety sake measure the voltage between the blower frame and ground. You will likely have to disconnect the ground to do this. This blower should be grounded when in operation even if there was no provision for it as it was manufactured.
I repaired one of these some time ago, and coal dust had collected on the armature around the commutator which resulted is a leakage voltage of some thing in the neighbor hood of 65 volts. NOT GOOD.
At least ground the frame, but if you have leakage you should either repair the commutator yourself or have it checked out at a good motor shop. This is only a problem with universal motors (those with brushes) but if you have a rheostat speed control that is most certainly the type of motor that you have.
Paul

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Just for safety sake measure the voltage between the blower frame and ground. You will likely have to disconnect the ground to do this. This blower should be grounded when in operation even if there was no provision for it as it was manufactured.
I repaired one of these some time ago, and coal dust had collected on the armature around the commutator which resulted is a leakage voltage of some thing in the neighbor hood of 65 volts. NOT GOOD.
At least ground the frame, but if you have leakage you should either repair the commutator yourself or have it checked out at a good motor shop. This is only a problem with universal motors (those with brushes) but if you have a rheostat speed control that is most certainly the type of motor that you have.
Paul

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