Dave Budd

Roman Ring ended knife

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Here is my version of a Roman ring ended knife. This type of knife is reasonably common during the Roman period and I rather like it, so went ahead and made one

Blade length: 7 1/2"
Overall length: 12 1/2"
material: EN47 (chrome vanadium spring steel)

Since I would never consider trying to make an exact copy of another of my knives, there seemed no point in recreating exactly an original. Instead I used these two roman examples for inspiriation

I'm seeing it as a very nice kitchen knife and the ring (apart from looking cool) would serve to hang it from a nail. Obviously, it could still be used for all sorts, but the look and feel of it suggest 'kitchen use' to me.

17529.attach

17532.attach

17533.attach

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Very nice looking knife, Dave. I also like the ring detail. Very clean and smooth lines. Just curious, did they leave the handles bare metal, or did they ever cover them somehow?

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thanks guys :)

there is no evidence for a wrapping, but there could've been and it didn't survive. It actually feels quite good in the hand, though I wouldn't try chopping a tree down with it! I spread teh handle area to a little thicker and more rounded on teh top and bottom surface, so that helps a lot.

It was all done with hammers and files. The ring was punched (more because my drill press broke down for a few days!) and then cleaned up with files

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i really like it Dave - i dont know anything about knives but i know what looks good! Love the ring detail and yeah i agree it says kitchen to me too. The ring looks fantastic:)

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Very nicely done indeed! Can you provide the cite for where the originals were described. I want to save the pics and do one myself.

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Alas, I don't have the provenance for those pictures :( I found them in threads on the Roman Army Talk forum. The bottom one came from Mainz and dated to 1st century BC, the other I don't know I'm afraid. Mostly this style seems to be La Tene III, ranging in date from 350BC to 200AD I think.

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The ring could have been used for a rope or chain? I just watched the movie "300" again ........ and was thinking combat. Roman Ninja throwing/retrievable thing?? Maybe not ...... LOL. I do like the way it came out. You know it looks good when it can go without a handle and look great. It would look great with a rawhide wrap with a reverse baseball stitch.

Mutt

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This particular "Ringgriffmesser" (ring gripped knife) is from the Manching Oppidum (or Hillfort) in Bavaria. This Celtic hillfort was occupied from roughly 450BCE - 100CE.

The cropped archaeological sketch is from a scan I made out of "Werkzeug und Ger

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That is a very smart and unique knife.

I totally agree about using it as a kitchen knife. Not only is the ring end very useful, but the all steel construction would make it much easier to keep clean. Too often custom makers doing kitchen knives in carbon steel apply handles that trap food and gunk and cause problems. This knife certainly won't have that problem.

As an all steel construction, it will also be easier to keep the finish in a nice state.

Very well done.

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Finding used editions is often next to impossible, and the original publisher rarely (if ever) does a reprint. So, quite frankly, with books like these (out of print archaeological reports/texts), I request them through Inter-Library Loan and then photocopy them.

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