urnesBeast

benchtop mounted or stand mounted tools

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As I layout my new shop, I find myself wondering if grinders, polishers, sanders should be on their own pedestals or mounted to a benchtop.

Pro Pedestal:
flexibility in location
takes less space
power cord can be better fixed out of the way
Height can be adjusted easier

Con Pedestal:
may not be as stable as bench mount
benches allow shelf storage underneath

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All of my stuff are on pedestals and the pedestals are bolted into the concrete. Lowes has some pretty good bench grinder pedestals, I think they still have them. The only thing I put on my steel benches are my two vices. Things like buffers, bench grinders, etc. take up a lot more workdesk area then you think and they spill out all their grist, dust, and buffing fiber all over your desk. So my grinders and buffers all throw their material away from my workspace. ;)

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I am not sure how I feel about bolting into my concrete at this point, it still has that "new shop smell" to it. Any good ideas on how to get the stability? Maybe bolt to some sheet metal/plywood that I stand on when using it?

I like the idea of the grit falling to the ground and not my hard to clean workbench.

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Place the face of the grinders/buffers/etc facing your workbench, that way they will throw most of their debris behind themselves, away from your workbench. All you need is a 1/4" masonry drill bit and some anchors. Really, it's not that bad. I've mounted tons of stuff into concrete with my 1/2' porter cable drill and it doesnt have a rotohammer attachment. I just tend to lift it out a little if it gets gummed up. Sometimes I'd even take a punch and tap in the hole a few times if it seems like its making no progress. That breaks anything that might be stopping it. Then if you move just get a bottle of concrete patch and fill in the holes, sand them flush and its good as new.

You could stand on plywood that they are attached to, that is also a good idea especially until you figure out where you want them permanently. You could also PL Premium polyurethane adhesive (the super strong brown one) them to the concrete. That would probably bond the metal stand fairly well to the concrete, even better if they were mounted on wood.

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A good portable stand is a piece of circular cut flat plate. Your weight standing on it makes it as stable as can be but it's easy to move, just tip it up and roll it where you want it. If you cut a slot in each disk a little larger than the post you can overlap the bases by slipping the slot over the post on it's neighbor. This can be a hassle getting to the one in the middle or bottom but does save a lot of floor space.

Another method is to make one to two circular bases for the bench tools you don't use every day. Weld a pipe coupler to the center and have the bench tool attached to the post. Now you can make a rack that'll hold quite a few machines in a small area and when you need one simply screw it to the base. The bases would store easily leaning against a wall behind a rack, etc.

Frosty

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And don't forget the that old standby - the car tire rim. With or without a rubber tire attached. With a tire mounded on it, they do roll/move a little easier. And the tire does grip the floor a little better to keep them from sliding/twisting. And if you need extra weight, just cast some cement in either the center of the wheel, or even inside that rubber tire. Regular pipe flanges can bolt right to that center mounding hole - and then use regular pipe to screw in for the pedestal.

It is nice to be able to move those pedestal mounted tools around to where you need to work, or out of the way at other times. And it does clear up that shelf/counter space for storing other junk.

Or consider a CART for those tools. Metal table/bench with or without wheels, that you can move about as needed. Locking wheels help, but good skids on the bottom will work as well. That would also give you shelf/storage below for other tools/attachments. And power outlets could be built in - with a main power cord to run out from beneath. Being able to get all the way around such an ... island ... workbench for those tools has lots of advantages. Think of it kind of like a combination mini workbench and pedestal stand. And a couple quick clamps could fix it to a regular workbench for more stability if needed.

It all depends upon your shop layout, available space, and what tools you use most often.

Just some humble thoughts to ponder.

Mikey - that grumpy ol' German blacksmith out in the Hinterlands

Edited by Mike Ameling

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i use a brake drum off a semi truck or trailer weld a pipe to it and some steel plates and when i need to move it just rollit on its side

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I really like the idea of using a cart for bench tools Mike. Lots of potential in that one.

Thanks,

Frosty

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I am also building a new workshop and my bench grinder will be bolted down where i need it on a big old square pipe. but belt grinder, buffer and drill press will all get a small table as I find it very important to have some table space for the stuff I work on at every place.
it all depends on if one has enough room to work in.

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At one time there was a blueprint of a stand for multiple bench mount machines that revolved around a horizontal axis. Quite a space saver, and a very nice design.

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Some tools sit on a bench, but for this sander-grinder I built a stand with lockable wheels in the back for moving the bench to where I need it. So far, I have not had to lock the wheels as the weight on the front feet seem to be sufficient to keep the stand in place. It is very stable, easy to change the belt speed, and has places to put tools and stuff within easy reach. The belt is tensioned by the weight of the motor. This arrangement provides 9 different belt speeds, just by lifting the front of the motor mount. This is how the motors seem to be mounted on my old Rockwell stationary tools.

The pivot is a 3/4" bolt, and a piece of 3/4" pipe welded to the motor mount. The motor mount is angle iron frame with a plate on top drilled for mounting the motor in a choice of positions. The back of the pivot is two pieces of angle iron drilled with matching 3/4" holes to give a selection of various heights. These options allowed me to find the height and location of the motor mount that worked best for me. Springs on the front take some of the pressure off of the belt.

I also mounted a magnetic motor switch on the frame. This arrangement works *really* well.

15080.attach

Edited by UnicornForge

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With a bench mounted grinder there is a temptation to leave stuff on the bench behind it. This will be quickly destroyed (or ignited) by sparks.

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Arftist
Makoz near Toowoomba, Australia uses this arrangement.

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Arftist
Makoz near Toowoomba, Australia uses this arrangement.


Thanks Glen. I really like that device, and would build one, time permitting. I was wondering whether it could be aranged to hold four machines instead of two though.

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Oh! Tricksey folk those Blokes down under. Yes indeed, tricksey, tricksey, tricksey.

I'm seeing four bench machines on that mount so long as they're not belt grinders. Now for running them from a single motor on a lower shelf.

Over the last couple summers I've picked up half a dozen jack shaft grinders, wire wheels, arbor buffs, etc. I think this mount or one like it will be ideal.

Thanks for posting Glenn and many, many thanks to Makoz for the idea.

Frosty

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I have a tiny shop with quite a bit of equipment and I found that the cart system works well for some of it. I put wheels on one end and on the other end I let the legs go to the floor. On the leg end I make a handle by welding a piece of square tubing or pipe flush with the frame and have a smaller section that telescopes into it, so when I need to move it, I slide the smaller piece out, pick up that end and move it ( like a wheelbarrow). when I get it where I want it, I slide the handle back in and it's out of the way. I also did this with my welding and cutting table which is pretty heavy, but used two handles and I can move it around fairly easy. I like this better than 4 wheels because it does'nt tend to roll when I don't want it to. Hope this helps.

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