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kubiack

Loading a Large Drill Press

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Does any one know what a Buffalo Forge #22 drill press weighs? I recently purchased one and will be going to pick it up next week. I am trying to determine if it will be manageable to load into a pickup or if I should bring a trailer. I would prefer not to bring the trailer as it is a few hours drive each way. I have experience transporting and loading heavy items with a trailer, lathe and knee mill, but not something this large in a pickup. I will have block and tackle, hand winches, and an engine hoist to use for loading.

I would also be open to disassembling the drill does anyone have a manual or exploded parts diagram I could get a copy of.

Thanks,

Brandon

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I googled to find a picture of your drill press. Assuming what I saw is what you are going to be moving, a pickup would do just fine. If your pickup bed is not long enough, just leave the tailgate open (be sure no great amount of weight is on it though.

Personally, I would not disassemble the drill press unless you don't have a way to lift it into and out of your pickup. I would just get a few old tires and put them in the bed of the pickup, then lower the drill press onto them I have moved several old mechanical powerhammers using this method. Tie the drill press down if you can. If not, wrap a rope or strap around part of it and attach that somewhere in the front of the bed. It isn't going to move around if you put it on tires unless you are in an accident (heaven forbid).

Good luck with your adventure.

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I own one of these drill presses.
Be careful, they are extremely top heavy.
Not really much there to disassemble.
If you are transporting it standing I would bottom out the table and "intermediate quill guide body" and maybe remove the motor to bring the center of gravity down some.
I love this thing, it is a real beast, I can drill a 1" hole through 1/2" plate without pilot hole.
Good luck

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Thanks for the replies. I will remove the motor and lower the table and quill feed. My plan is tip it into the pickup bed pivoting the column on the end of the tailgate and then slide it into the bed. Looking at the press I think I could manage this but I am not sure of the weight.

James do you have a ball park on the weight of the machine.

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I got the drill press home this weekend. It was way too large to load in a pickup without an overhead hoist. The person I bought it from had a

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I have a similar royersford. It's nearly 1000 lbs with the factory motor mount and motor. I transported it upright in a u-haul trailer. We used a forklift to load it, and a tall chain hoist to unload it. The practicalmachinist forum has a number of users of these in the antiques section and there are various pictures and specs posted.

Enjoy the drill. They make drilling more fun. Do not rely on holding your work by hand. It probably has around a 1 HP motor, reduced down to low, low RPM (17 in my case). You will not be able to stop it by hand.

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Since i haven't bragged about it yet here is how i moved the frame of my spring hammer. ; ) My estimate of weight is in the 700kg region.

at_Port_Kembla2.JPG

We wheeled it into a horse float (tandem axle, 1 ton rating), drove it 100 miles to storage. Then wheeled it into my van for last leg to museum workshop.
Andrew O'C

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Jacob thanks for the advice. The drill has nice large table with t-slots I will get a vise for it once I have it fully operational.

Andrew that is a nice looking dolly that you hammer frame is mounted on was it built specifically for moving the hammer?

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Yep kubiack, knocked up in a hurry for this pick up.
The wheels have auto front spindles/ steering knuckles in them, they were screwed to timber beams which had various packing pieces nailed on to support the hammer frame. worked well enough to move, gently, until being nudged with a forklift at the workshop. I've now made steel girder axles to suit these wheels and spindles, stay tuned for photo...
Apart from the flimsiness of the timber version, the only other problem was the base plate being to low and catching on the horse float ramp during loading. It was all fun.

New steel frame has a steering set and shall be adaptable to other machines, just have to remind myself NEVER to drive it down the road!

Andrew.

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