jw223

Shop Pics / design advice

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Hello to all! I'm going to put up a new shop now that the weather has finally broken, and I was wondering if anyone has posted pics of their shops. i am very new to this, so any help with a efficient floor plan would be nice. I know from my other interests that no shop is ever big enough, but i'm thinking 30' x 30'. Other than building costs, are there any advantages to rectangle instead of square? I'd like to use stone for the walls w/a metal roof. let me know your thoughts.
thanks- jw223

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As far as the floor, I am assuming you will go with concrete. Make sure to get a good smooth floor cast. Any texture such as a brushed finish will make sweeping up a hassle. This has been my experience

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you should consider your power hammer or if you will get one. Because it could crack the cement under it so you might want to pour that part deeper then the rest.

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How thick? 6-8" or more like 12". I don't have one yet, but i hadn't even considered what the vibraton would probably do to a 4" floor.

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4? Not sure that will last long for a real shop. I did 6.5, with 4500 mix. Also used 5/8 rebar on 3 ft centers... welcome to the heart ache of a new shop :)

Dont ask us smiths about what is best in YOUR area, as soil varies. Ask construction people about what lasts, there WILL be major vibrations form power hammer, so a separate slab has advantages, and not much more $$ to get it right, also electrically bond the floor to the grounds.

Edited by steve sells

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plan for storage of metal stock, lots of room for that, egads, its taking over my shop aaaaaarrrrrgggg!

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My shop's 30' x 40' and was getting cluttered before the roof was on. The slab is 6" with #5 rebar on 2' centers. There are 2" sq receiver tube sockets (gozintas) on a 4' grid and grounded. These are connected under the slab to an exhaust system for down draft fume and smoke exhaust. The area where the power hammer(s) go is 8" of concrete with #5 rebar 1' on center. There's also hydronic tubing in the floor for the day I get a boiler.

It has one overhead door and one man door, windows to come.

Power and light, you can't have too much of either.

Lift capacity is always a good thing.

An icebox and a couch for naps.

Frosty

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I try to keep grinding and smithing operations near the big overhead door for smoke and dust evacuation, and put the mill and lathe in the back as far from the grinders as possible. Wallspace runs out before floorspace.

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shop layout really vary with tooling ...it is a balanceing act between what you have (or plan to get ) and where it will work .if you have machine tools (lathe, mill ect) most guys build a seperate room for them to keep the smoke dust ect off them... in that case a 20X40 shop would probably be easyier but setup is going to be a indivigual thing.. I have setup 4 shops and the one thing i can say is more wall outlets! lota wall outlets!! good luck!

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Good tip for the piping for radiant heating frosty. I'll have to remember that for my shop when I'm out of school. I'd suggest hooking up with your guild members and seeing what they have and what they would do differently if possible. As many shops in the area as possible without cutting locks to see them. Always remember ventilation, lighting and a good water source in the building which I would have a hose hooked up to as well as good fire extinguisher stations. And a second exit is possible.

I would disagree with the smoothest possible cement, yes it does make sweeping a pain but I've worked on smooth cement and if it gets any oil or water on it, you're walking on goose droppings the whole time which gets very dangerous. A good shop vacuum gets over the sweeping issue. Your call though. Sweeping can be a pain but so can a broken wrist.

Depending on your size, you might want to think about making sure your rafters can handle an overhead track for moving heavy metal.

For power outlets, retractable boxes hanging from the roof are handy too. A light near every planned work station wouldn't be a miss although you can always put up a movable worklight.

Make sure it is done right the first time though. Plan, plan and then plan some more. Come up with all sorts of scenarios and work through them.

Edited by easilyconfused

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My shop is 40X60. In the end, last bay, I'll have an office, clean room and bathroom. So my effective floor space will be 40' x 48' with 12' for office with storage above (16' eves).
I do wood and metal so I run wood on one side and metal on the other. Open floor in the middle for layout and assembly of large projects. Dust has already been an issue, Cherry and steel dust don't mix:o I have partitions but I may need to have something more possitive (vacuum). as others have said, keep the dirty work up by the big door. My smithing and grinding section will ultimatly wind up in the corner by the roll up door so I can contain as much of the mess as possible. As others have mentioned, think about going long and skinny as appossed to square. Also be carefull when installing hydronic tubes in the floor if you plan on bolting down machines. It would be a shame to drill one. you can use the same technology for heat by running hot water through a car radiator with a fan behind it (another story).

I am planning on running my power in a gutter so I can add or change capacity and locations for outlets easier. I will run the gutter at say 5' off the ground and put in indavidual drops for plugs and machine disconnects. Works really well if you keep the wire organized inside. As far as power to much is never enough, go for as much as you can afford:) Also, take lots of pictures of areas that will get barried during construction, footing, floor and inside walls. Place something in the picture for accurate scale. You won't regret it.

GOOD LUCK!!! and Cogratulations!!!!
Wooo Hoooo New shop!!!

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Good point about the hydronic heat tubing in the floor. I have it mapped and each gozinta is a close benchmark. The tubing is attached under the rebar 2" and 14" from the gozintas. This way I can locate anchors without hitting them.

Frosty

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Of course, you could always put the electrical wires above the pipes so if you were to drill into them, you're drill would shut off if you were going to hit them ;). AND you'd get that perfect new hairstyle!

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Of course, you could always put the electrical wires above the pipes so if you were to drill into them, you're drill would shut off if you were going to hit them ;). AND you'd get that perfect new hairstyle!


You work for the Gvt. Don't you. :rolleyes:

Frosty

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Don't forget pipe for compressed air. Big pipe, Big comprssor. Air tools of all sorts solve problems that electrical tools only wish they could.

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i have cement and wish i didnt...i like working on hard dirt floors or some conflagertion of such....so much easier on your feet....no sweeping....i have made two rooms outta 1...so i have forges in 1 and benchwork is another and grinders are on a table on wheels so the can go outside when there is alot of grinding to do. My one steel table has a folding leaf for space considerations....i also work outside when the weather permits so all my stuff is semi portable....I am gettin old ....

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You can get good rubber mats for around your forge at lots of stores. I like the dirt for my feet but I hate how it looses pieces you've just finished or tools.

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Thanks for all the advice guys! The radiant floor is definitely a must. I’ve put in quite a few of them at my day job, so I’ll definitely have a good site map of all utilities & a few copies! my last shop was long and skinny (25 x 63) it was nice to have a front half and back half, but wall space on the short walls was almost nil. The gutter for the power is a great idea FE-Wood, that always make pulling extra circuits later that much easier. as soon as I break ground, I'll get some pics up. Is anyone using gantry cranes, or is a fixed beam & trolley more common? Maybe I'll post a print for "review" before I start. Fresh eyes are often helpful to help point out overlooked mistakes. I only want to do this once... for now...

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OHHH a Crane. I read about several gantry cranes in an auction I couldn't attend selling for $10 to $25. That was three months ago and I'm still kicking myself...legs getting tired too.

Good Luck...Looking forward to pics.

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Wow- that's CHEAP!!! I never seem to find those deals. I was just thinking that movable lifting would really be a plus. Thanks again for the advice. Hopefully I'll get some pics up soon.

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didn't notice anyone mention height of ceiling/trusses/roof.............if you're going to be swinging 10 - 20 foot long pieces of steel, high clearance overhead is really nice, 12 foot or more would be good. Also, there is a lot of storage space in the trusses if the cross pieces are strong enough.

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