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31 minutes ago, JHCC said:

Impressive! Has it been ground & heat treated yet?

No sir, poured yesterday, still very hot! Question for you, if i ground them like we do all castings top and bottom and belt sanded the top would that be adequate in your opinion? If I do not need to mill them like I have been doing the smaller ones it would save a ton of labor and I could sell them at a cheaper price. TGIF and thank you! 

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Using something like a surface grinder? As long as it's reasonably flat, I don't see why not. Same goes for the smaller ones: if the milling dramatically increases the cost without adding any significant benefit, why bother?

(Oh, and it's not "cheaper" -- it's "more affordable"!)

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For using: we just want a fairly smooth face and don't really care how it gets there.  Personally I don't thing a new anvil face needs to be polished; just smooth.

Old school anvils were ground on the face using large natural sandstone grinding wheels, I've seen the remnants in the river below the old anvil manufacture in Columbus OH.  Seemed to work OK for them as they were rated as one of the top anvils made in the USA  by Postman IIRC.

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 I personally would rather finish the face to what I want vs what I was given...    I like a slight crown to the face vs completely flat and if it were to lower the price some it's all the better for the buyer and for you to increase sales and still make the profit needed..   Also I wouldn't worry about the sprue risers or such of maybe offer a completed unit and a unit one can clean up on their own..    A fully hardened horn, tail and face would be best vs just the face/tail.. 

I like what you have done..  I'm still partial to the graduated horn but I like the fact you made it conical or truncated with a full tip on it vs docked back/off.. 

Nice with the side shelf..  Personally I'd like to have upsetting blocks both sides, side shelf and graduated horn like the German style, and 2,  1" hardie holes,  but if budget allowed I'd be up for one of these? 

Few pics of the face perhaps..  the Castings look nice an clean..   I can see why you are busy with work..  Nicely done.. 

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33 minutes ago, jlpservicesinc said:

I personally would rather finish the face to what I want vs what I was given.

I think Fontanini Anvils offers their anvils in both finished and unfinished, with about a $200 difference in price.

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:o

Nimba offers the unfinished option also.

That anvil is impressive. You have created a masterpiece.

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On 5/4/2018 at 2:36 PM, jlpservicesinc said:

  the Castings look nice an clean..   I can see why you are busy with work..  Nicely done.. 

The casting does look great I must say. When we took it out of the blast we all gave it a wow! 1st articles can be a struggle at times. It was so hot we had to put it on an iron plate as a skid would have burned. 

The crown down the center line would be the parting and draft, at least on mine, both top and bottom. We would need to get the bottom flat by grinding so it would sit on a flat surface. A couple of guys that have hard verbal orders want them milled so we will see how it goes and keep track of the time involved and cost. 

On hardening, H13 gets hardened completely, not surface hardened. All of my commercial castings are sold annealed as they go into tool shops for machining. In extrusion dies like a wheel mold they are typically used in that condition as hardening does not help with wear. Other applications require hardening, depends on the end use. We use a world class heat treater 30 miles from my shop and I am relying on their expertise on the process which is a vacuum process with a quench of i believe Nitrogen then a couple of tempers. 

I appreciate everyone comments over the past few months. Have a fine day and cheers! 

 

On 5/4/2018 at 3:50 PM, JlBlohm said:

That anvil is impressive. You have created a masterpiece.

When the asparagus starts to pop I will be in your hood a few times. I will bring a few anvils up and meet you at the Brown Bear for one. Thanks for the kind words

 

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found this one at a last chance shop before scrap-it. I figuring 130#   don't know what the v3 is for - and not sure what that side casting is supposed to be.... 50 bucks... I'll take it. Actually, I had to get the wife to go get it , since they were kind enough to load it for her...

anvil1.JPG

anvil2.JPG

anvil3.JPG

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That’s a top-quality anvil at less than 40 cents per pound. You, my friend, are a lucky bug. 

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Note that Fisher Anvils are the highest quality of the anvils that don't ring!  So don't let anyone snow you that it's not a good anvil cause it goes thwap instead of TING!  My main shop anvil is a 468# Fisher and a joy to use these last 20 years or so...

That front leg should have the weight on it, however divided by 10; so a 130 would be 13. A bathroom scale will get you in the ballpark if you have to know the weight...

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Beautiful anvil Foundryguy! I think offering rough and fine finished is a good idea. By rough, grind the foot flat and knock off the sprue and risers maybe the worst of the flash and let the end user finish it to their liking. Fine finish would be of course ground and if necessary milled with a face and horn ground to maybe a 120 grt finish. Heck polished to a high shine if someone is willing to pay the charge, it was good enough for Champion and other old school makers. 

SWEET score on the Fisher, Ken! I hope you bought a lottery ticket while your luck was still hot!

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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Going with completed, at least for now. The art is in the heat treat and I want anything with my name on it to be done correctly. Cheers,

 

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Yeah, you want to bring as nice a new product to the market as you can, offer lesser finishes later. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Found a chunk of railcar knuckle... debating on it I should take off that shelf or leave it.

20180510_151630.jpg

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When I used one I turned it and used the flattish section projecting downward from where the cigarette filter is  and the curved section to the left of it.  Perhaps not as efficient as the vertical orientation but I could work with it. I think my knuckle was a bit more complete too. IIRC it was about 80 pounds.

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Use it for a while in a variety of orientations and see how you like it. If it does turn out to be very much in the way, get rid of it. Otherwise, it’s another shape that you can make use of.

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^I like your reasoning, why remove it if it hasn't gotten in the way yet

29 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

When I used one I turned it and used the flattish section projecting downward from where the cigarette filter is  and the curved section to the left of it.  Perhaps not as efficient as the vertical orientation but I could work with it. I think my knuckle was a bit more complete too. IIRC it was about 80 pounds.

Yeah judging by the 10lb sledgehammer I've been using this is maybe about 55lbs. I can always turn it on its side down the road but right now I'm keen having a "pritchel hole". 

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build a stand to hold it in many different configurations; shoot I've even turned my London pattern anvil upside down to use the indentation in the base to dish into!

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37 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

build a stand to hold it in many different configurations

An open-top box full of sand is a good option: very easy to realign the knuckle, and it'll be equally stable in pretty much any orientation.

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I had already planned to build a 3x3 base of 4x4 and make one side 9 inches taller so I can tie it with constrictor knots

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Bottom to top; Russian Toad 110#, Mousehole 98#, JHM Basic 70#, Equipment Rail 14#, smaller equipment rail, India paper weight.

BTS5ttl.jpg

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