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I am not on here to sell as I have no inventory and need to set things up with a website.  $6 to 7 a lb based on actual weight if I can get things rolling. Its a very expensive part to make to this spec. Hopefully the quality will justify the investment.  

I appreciate all the comments, support and ideas. A 400 and 450 double horn are in the works

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Nice. Cant wait to see the big boys.

I figured i would ask because i seen your craigslist post and was curious about this one. I know the forum administrators would probably want permission to post a for sale but i figured it wouldnt hurt to ask.

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I will be in touch when I get it machined and hardened and meet you at the Bear sometime.

There is a demonstration at the Shelby blacksmith Supply on Saturday. Danvers Child from Lafayette Indiana, he is a well respected farrier. I might be up there as I would like to meet him.

This site has given me great info and it's fun to show what I am up to! 

 

 

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On 3/28/2018 at 8:18 AM, foundryguy said:

My first 200 lb H13 anvil casting. 198 lbs before machining. Anxious to get this tool completed

A great accomplishment!  I'm really happy to see her come into the world and looking forward to seeing what you come up with next.

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Trying to help my Dad identify this one.  250-300 pounds. Has a 25 on one end and what appears to be an 1800s stamp date on opposite end. It has a recessed square on one side but I can’t find any writing in it. 

D8ACE5DE-E638-4792-8C92-FDD2FA5761EE.jpeg

31B6C8B4-D475-40A7-A286-B3BF7400DC4D.jpeg

684A9206-3982-4E3E-AFAB-4695CCC594D2.jpeg

5D37FD4D-F9B7-49F7-9588-37C382DF9100.jpeg

1833E7A5-C8CA-4244-985D-4C8BF318B994.jpeg

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My 400 double horn is taking shape. CAD says it will come in at 420 raw weight so finish weight should be in the 405 range. Shelf is on the opposite side of the step seen here. 

Today I am going to reduce the size of the badge. My design guy got carried away as you can see on the photo. The casting photo is my 200 and I plan on making the same badge size and depth. I think we scaled it up on the computer and it is overwhelming in my opinion. 

The hardy and hole will be on the same end as seen by the core prints. Hoping to cast the hole like the hardy as drilling through this much H13 is not fun. 

I should be casting a couple of these next week in H13

I hope it is OK to say on here if not let me know. I have a FB page called Holland Anvil and i will be updating progress as well as here at times. 

400doublehorn.jpg

anvil200raw.jpg

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Impressive!

Casting the pritchel would presumably give a rougher interior surface to the hole, which in turn might give a bit more tooth to keep a hold-down in place. 

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Foundryguy,  It looks great..     Personally I want an anvil that doesn't have a demarcation between the body of the anvil and the horn..    This demarcation limits the use of a hammer as you get closer to the horn while using the horn..   Also 2 hardie holes vs 1.. With anvils in this size range the pritchel hole becomes over sized and making an insert or using a punch block becomes more productive..  and No factory chamfer of the hardie holes.. 

I've been using the Peddinghaus 275 for awhile now and found it lacking in the areas stated above..  The other major down fall with the Peddinghaus is the fact that both the pritchel and Hardie hole comes out over the feet.. This keeps longer stock from being able to pass the feet.. You can see in the Refflinghaus that both holes are moved away from the feet thus allowing for the bars to pass by easily.. 

 was going to draw pictures but why when there are pictures all ready..  Adding in your own spin is great.. an upsetting block on both sides would be nice also.. 

Last pic is the 275P.. 

58 275 lb anvils 003 a small.jpg

From Catalogue.jpg

95340.jpg

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11 minutes ago, jlpservicesinc said:

Personally I want an anvil that doesn't have a demarcation between the body of the anvil and the horn

Along those same lines, I don't want the top overhanging the sides, as it is in the smaller Holland. It looks like it's been taken care of in the 400, which is good. A continuous side at right angles to the top is extremely useful, especially for making right-angle bends.

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Not to mention that the "fake faceplate" on cast anvils is very much a warning sign that it may be an ASO.  Further testing would show it wasn't but a lot of folks are shall we say "adverse to further work"?  (Some cast steel anvils had the overhang too but it seems that almost all the cast iron ASO's have it.  At least my 220# Buffalo did...)

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I can not rework the tooling at this point other than the reduction of my badge or it will be 2019 before I can make a casting. Too many opinions led me in too many directions on this site and others. Ask 100 Smiths and I get 199 different answers. A perfect anvil to one person will have a dozen flaws or errors to the next person. Its kind of like comparing a Chevy to a BMW. Neither is perfect that is why I own both! :D

On the little 85 lber, i found the pattern and only added the name and hardy. I plan on changing the name to Holland Anvil instead of my company name. 

What is ASO? I did not follow that? My anvils are cast solid and hardened throughout, not a surface hardening. I added the name in a recess so it can not be easily removed by someone. 

Also, in the last photo JLP posted it looks like the hardy does not go through the anvil at all and if it did it a long shaft would hit the base? Maybe its a camera angle?

I also had several people direct me to put the upsetting block and the shelf on opposite sides unlike the photo above. They called it a knuckle buster? It is a bit more difficult to cast but we did make that change. 

 

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ASO = Anvil Shaped Object and no, you aren't casting ASOs.

The reference is to the exaggerated false face plate on cast iron ASOs. My Soderfors has a demarcation between the body and false face plate. Like yours it's deeply hardened steel and has no need of a "face plate." When Soderfors was being imported there was a lot of negative advertising about Swedish cast steel anvils and one piece of propaganda was the lack of a steel face plate.

Of course I could be wrong but I believe casting in a line to represent a separate face plate was necessary to get the public to buy the things. Now it's a tradition and the "If a little is good a lot must be better" philosophy has over sized false face plates, especially the cheap cast iron knockoffs. 

That's a beautiful anvil, I agree the badge is a bit much but I wouldn't toss it out the door for that.  :rolleyes: It's a minor issue that'll get cleaned up in the design tweaks.

Well done Brother.

Frosty The Lucky.

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16 minutes ago, foundryguy said:

Ask 100 Smiths and I get 199 different answers.

So few?

;)

 

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2 hours ago, Frosty said:

ASO = Anvil Shaped Object and no, you aren't casting ASOs.

The reference is to the exaggerated false face plate on cast iron ASOs. My Soderfors has a demarcation between the body and false face plate. Like yours it's deeply hardened steel and has no need of a "face plate." When Soderfors was being imported there was a lot of negative advertising about Swedish cast steel anvils and one piece of propaganda was the lack of a steel face plate.

Thank you for the explanation. The badge is getting smaller as we speak. I am looking forward to getting a few cast and hopefully good field reports. Casting pics in a week or so!

 

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That is my point that a bar will not pass through the hardie or the pritchel hole and yes the holes go through but the feet are in the way.. ..   The refflinghaus's holes are far enough away from the feet to allow a clean and clear pass through.. 

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I am so looking forward to seeing the finished product. Can't afford even the shipping but am happy to see more being produced, competition is good for everybody.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Where is the thread asking which or what options should be looked at for production.. I'd like to see what others are suggesting.. 

The side shelf being a knuckle buster is dependent on which way you have the horn facing and whether you are left handed or right handed.. 

I'm right handed and have my anvil horn to the right this would traditionally put the shelf on my side vs the far side..  I actually prefer this as it puts the shelf in the most powerful hammering position..  Drawing to you is always more powerful then pushing the hammer away..  It also allows for a lower hammer handle position thus offering a better position for tilting of the hammers handle to expose different facets of the face to the anvil.. 

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My pride of the shop the Carl  Schlasse from 1882 (not sure on the weight but we needed 4 people to lift it on the stand)

48D6FFAE-C89E-4DA8-A2B2-8223ADA3C38E.thumb.jpeg.ada412bb664767664a7096e99a54d81c.jpeg  

And on the other end of the spectrum, this aso cut out of a massive plate of 1030 steel with a torch and prettied up with an angle grindeED366A5A-D874-4EC2-A218-05F1B3143C94.thumb.jpeg.e68525d0b41f4026cff179ac31180b5c.jpeg

 

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If you can forge on it; it's not an ASO, it's an anvil.

ASO is reserved for cast iron things where the face will dent under hot steel being worked!

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I'm just about to purchase this Peter Wright.   I'm 49 years old, and I have been interested in blacksmithing my whole life. When I was eight I used to walk to my mothers hair salon after school and next-door was a Blacksmith hammering  away in a 10 x 10' shed.   It's only now in life that I have an opportunity to explore this. I found this Peter right in a  fleamarket. He's asking $400.  it's about 150 pounds. I love the anvil, but there's a serious depression in the top as you can see in the picture. There is some level area still. Any thoughts? 

IMG_1480.JPG

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Welcome to the forum. Depending on where the anvil is located $2.60 U.S. per pound is not a bad price as long as the ring & rebound are good. If you get it please do not do any milling or grinding on the face which will basically ruin a usable anvil.

I always suggest reading this thread to get the best out of IFI.

https://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/53873-read-this-first/

 

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Check the ring and rebound over the whole face of the anvil. If it's pretty dead in that area might have more issues then just the depression. If it still rings around that area has good rebound it'll make a fine usable anvil. 

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