Recommended Posts

SHVTZHOT, you have warmed the hearts of all IFI members.  I’ve lost count of the number of times experienced members have done backflips trying to convince new members to not abuse their anvils by attempting to grind or weld the precious steel face.  Well done!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Hi, I'm a clueless idiot and I'm going to show you how you can drop the value of your anvil by hundreds of dollars and in some cases make it useless as an anvil; but don't worry if you follow my instructions I will disavow any responsibility for you damaging or ruining your anvil!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And don't forget to mention how useful a sharp edge and a needle sharp horn is on an anvil :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK: And don't forget to make the edges sharp  and a the Horn needle sharp as it came from the factory that way!  Also next time you buy a new car demand they do NOT remove the plastic covering the windshield or put gasoline in it because it came from the factory that way and that's just how you will be using it!

sufficient?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/25/2018 at 5:01 PM, VaughnT said:

200 and 400 lb anvils could certainly find favor with folks if the price is right.  Made in America, too?  That's really sweet to see.  On them, I'd prefer a double-horn anvil with upsetting block and clipping shelf.

Leaving the horn and cutting table soft means they aren't hardened and tempered like they main face is.  Since you're doing the whole thing in an oven, you'd have to go back and somehow spot anneal the horn and table.

Vaughn, The 2 larger models i have drawn up for the heavier anvils are a classic look if you will. The weights are estimates at this time but we should be close, maybe a bit less with finish removed during machining. The only option I have on heat treat is to harden the entire casting. As you probably know, this is an interesting endeavor as there are dozens of ideas and everyone wants something different. I can not tell you how many "ideas" have been sent to me on here and other sites. Heat treating as you may know is very expensive. I might pay $.25 per lb for an anneal prior to machining and close to $1.00 per lb for hardening. Pricing of $6.00 per lb is inline with production castings that we currently make for companies. 

All castings are made in Holland Michigan at my foundry which was started in 1975 by my father who is 90 and still stops in a couple days a week. My Grand Father started my pattern shop in 1945 which I still operate as well as the foundry. The only complication I have is that we are very busy so I am not sure when they will be completed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That really is an awesome story.  It's the American dream, of a sorts, to see something passed down through the generations like that.  The family history you have tied up in the business, and how much history your shop has seen... boggles the mind.

If you ever think to branch out into other anvil styles, the world dearly needs a beautiful church-window anvil. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Post or send me a photo if you are able. My CAD guy, where patterns start these days is looking for something to draw. How big is ideal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll dig through the pics I've saved.  I think the church windows are purely aesthetic, but they sure do add to the looks.  As far as I'm aware, nobody makes them anymore since they don't really add to the function.  Still far sexier than the standard London-Pattern anvil like we're all used to using.  Size is relative since a lot of folks want a smaller anvil.  Horn, no horn, big, small...  a good anvil is a joy and can be found a use for. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, foundryguy said:

Post or send me a photo if you are able.

Not quite a church window pattern but close, Steve Fontanini out in Wyoming is currently having his pattern cast out of 8624, in years past the alloy was advertised as something custom but very close to H13.  

P8170002.thumb.jpg.92dff4eca24e89e465113f6b61d64a40.jpg

 

I would suggest that a new anvil should come with crisp corners and a pointy horn, let the user alter the tool to suit.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Sharp edges and needle sharp horn" ... that was a joke by me. Not intended to be taken seriously by anyone I hope :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh!, so now I need to re-radius my anvil edges and blunt my horn again?! All that Grinding for Nothing! :P

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes you should blunt your horn, just tell your striker "when I nod my head---HIT IT!"  Your anvil's horn will be dealt with by the next owner...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way no new anvil has sharp horn, may be a more than desirable crisp edge sure. You can imagine why ... "Sir ... my new anvil has rounded edges, I wanted a new anvil not a used one"

But sharp pointy horn? never seen that.

Then again, I have seen horses throw up,  so nothing will surprise me. 

On 2/28/2018 at 12:24 AM, Daswulf said:

Oh!, so now I need to re-radius my anvil edges and blunt my horn again?! All that Grinding for Nothing! :P

Yes, and sell that surface grinder you used to flatten the anvil will you :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Judson Yaggy said:

useless quote removed

I did find some church window pics but thank you for yours. 8624 is a common structural steel and poured by any steel foundry in the country. You see it everyday in construction equipment such as dozers or loaders. H13 is a tool steel used in permanent molds and extrusion dies, mostly for casting aluminum. The advantage of H13 is you can get it harder and it is designed to work with hot materials with out changing its hardness or characteristics. Anyway, I am sure the other castings work fine for the users. 

Question, the tab on the top? What is that called and designed for? I have seen it on different designs. Cheers! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, JHCC said:

garbage removed

PLEASE STOP SPAMMING US

Fascinating! Thank you for the followup. Much more strength to the shelf than the one I commented on. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@foundryguy, there's no need to quote an entire post when replying, and please don't quote pictures unless there's something specific therein that cannot be easily described. Many of our members are on dial-up internet, and it really eats up bandwidth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Foundryguy , do you use an induction furnace for melting? If so you could probably make a coil for heat treating the tops of the anvils in house.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Charles R. Stephens, 

You'll be happy to know that I have replaced my ugly hunka railroad track with this guy. 70 pound TFS farrier anvil! 

mine!!!.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are my anvils the first 2 pictures are my vulcan number 10 and the other one is an anvil i bought im hoping to get some more info on.

20180104_131822.thumb.jpg.e2baa2f22c5a550cbc719a3a957db6b6.jpg

20180104_131753.thumb.jpg.108f117e60e8df3a63e07dcb5162a314.jpg

00n0n_jyyryhg3D7w_600x450.jpg.a1cf4a0086c613b54c3efe660146722d.jpg

On 2/14/2018 at 3:51 PM, foundryguy said:

Just cast, annealed and machined. H13 tool steel to be hardened to 52-55 RC this weekend. 85 lbs, made in Michigan! We will polish the horn and drill the hole in them tomorrow. 

I dont live too far from you. I have been considering one these. I seen your craigslist ad. Im waiting to see the 200 and 400 #ers. Kinda hoping to see a double horn. You should join Don Foggs place. https://www.bladesmithsforum.com/ they like people to use there real names though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/14/2018 at 8:58 PM, foundryguy said:

i know little about the step and hardness. My plan is to harden the first batch to one hardness level 52-55 Rc. That process cost $1.00 per lb at best. I  need simple and quick as things are very busy. To be clear, I am a life long foundryman, not a blacksmith! 

Can you get the hardness above 55HRc?

By the way i like the thick heal. Reminds me of a Brooks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The patterns on the larger anvils are done and being cast this week. I made a 4th anvil,  double horn, 400 lbs with a shelf, it is really cool!  My hardness is 52 to 55, you may be able to get them harder. Thanks for the note on the heel, three people wrote me telling me I am all wrong, you are the 4th that likes it? Cheers! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No pictures?  I'd be interested in a large double horn with side shelf and upsetting block..  straight truncated horn..  5" face width 474-500lbs..  41 total length.. 1" hardie holes 2 instead of pritchel hole..  That is if you are looking for other designs.. 

double horn.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.